QUEER CAFE │ LGBTQ INFORMATION NETWORK │ RAINBOW OF RELEVANT RESOURCES

PRIDE
 

Wikipedia: Pride Parades

World Wide Pride Celebrations

This is Me: Celebrate Pride Month

Pride Parade Survival Guide

NYC Celebrates Pride Month in a Big Way

Chicago Tribune: Gay Pride Parades Across the Nation

History: First Gay Pride Parades

YouTube: New York City Pride Parade Highlights

Vox: LGBTQ Pride Explained

Info: LGBTQ Protests and Demonstrations

Top Ten Best Pride Festivals

Reuters: Washington DC Gay Pride Draws Thousands

Advocate: Over 100 Photos From Palm Springs Pride

 

LGBTQ Pride Parades

 

Pride parades (also known as pride marches, pride events, and pride festivals) are events celebrating and affirming lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) culture and raising awareness of LGBTQ issues and concerns. The events also at times serve as demonstrations for legal rights such as same-sex marriage. Most pride events occur annually, and many take place around June to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City, a pivotal moment in modern LGBTQ social movements.

 



Many parades still have at least some of the original political or activist character, especially in less accepting settings. The variation is largely dependent on the political, economic and religious activity of the area. However, in more accepting cities, the parades take on a festive, or even Mardi Gras-like, character. Many have a party-like atmosphere. Some parades may include elements that are not entirely appropriate for minor children.

 

 

Large parades often involve floats, dancers, drag queens, and amplified music.  They also include marchers carrying flags, signs, and banners and participants throwing beads into the crowd. Some include celebrities, marching bands, motorcycles, skaters, and acrobats. But even such celebratory parades usually include political and educational contingents, such as local politicians and marching groups from LGBTQ institutions and organizations of various kinds.

 

 

Other typical parade participants include local LGBTQ bars and clubs, organizations that provide specialized services to the LGBTQ community (support groups, clinics, LGBTQ centers), LGBTQ-friendly businesses, local LGBTQ-friendly churches (Metropolitan Community Churches, United Church of Christ, Unitarian Universalist Churches), Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG), LGBTQ student organizations from local colleges, and LGBTQ employee associations from large businesses.

 

 

Top Ten Best Pride Festivals

Pride Parade Survival Guide

Gay Pride Events: Protest or Party

How to be a Better Ally at Pride Events

NPR: From Pride to Protest at LGBTQ Parades

Info: LGBTQ Protests and Demonstrations

Pride Event Tips for Straight People

 

Even the most festive parades usually offer some aspect dedicated to remembering victims of AIDS and anti-LGBTQ violence. Some particularly important pride parades are funded by governmental agencies and corporate sponsors, and promoted as major tourist attractions for the cities that host them. In some countries, some pride parades are now also called Pride Festivals. Some of these festivals provide a carnival-like atmosphere in a nearby park or city-provided closed-off street, with information booths, music concerts, barbecues, beer stands, contests, sports, and games.

 

 

The 'dividing line' between onlookers and those marching in the parade can be hard to establish in some events. However in cases where the event is received with hostility, such a separation becomes very obvious. There have been studies considering how the relationship between participants and onlookers is affected by the divide, and how space is used to critique the heteronormative nature of society.

 

YouTube: Los Angeles Pride Parade Highlights

Gay Pride Parades: Identity, Protest, Tradition

NBC News: Pride March Turns Into Protest

World Wide Pride Celebrations

Vox: LGBTQ Pride Explained

Straight Allies at Pride Events

Gay Pride Calendar

 

Celebrating LGBTQ Pride

 

Today Gay Pride parades occur on weekends in June throughout the United States, as well as in many other countries around the world. It is unusual for folklorists to be able to say exactly when and where a tradition began, but this is a rare case when history does record the events. The tradition of Gay Pride parades grew out of a conflict between Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer New Yorkers and police. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, homosexual behavior, cross-dressing, and other expressions of gender nonconformity were treated as crimes in most parts of the United States. On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, New York, to arrest LGBTQ patrons. Protests and conflicts with police lasted several days, and have come to be called the Stonewall riots.

Stonewall was a galvanizing event in the quest for Gay rights. A short time after the events at Stonewall Inn, new Gay rights organizations began springing up, particularly in New York, California, and Chicago. And publications were created to help spread the movement.

 

 

Wikipedia: Pride Parades

World Wide Pride Celebrations

This is Me: Celebrate Pride Month

Pride Parade Survival Guide

Chicago Tribune: Gay Pride Parades Across the Nation

History: First Gay Pride Parades

 
On June 28, 1970, the first anniversary of the Stonewall Inn riots was marked with the first “Gay Pride” or “Gay Freedom” parades in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. In the 1970s, women’s rights and African American rights were already making headlines and securing allies throughout American society, and Gay rights joined them. The San Francisco marchers used “Gay Freedom” in their parades through 1994, but “Gay Pride” was the phrase that caught on in most of the rest of the country. The concept of “Gay Pride” was patterned on a successful effort in the African American Civil Rights movement to use “Black Pride” to expand the conversation from protests alone to a positive expression of identity.

 

   

One characteristic of Gay Pride events is the use of humor to get serious points across. Aware that one of the issues they needed to confront was fear, demonstrators made humor a standard in the expression of Gay Pride early on. Inclusiveness is also a strong feature of these events: all supporters of the cause are welcomed.

The use of the rainbow flag as a symbol of LGBTQ unity and pride is also bound up in the creation of the Gay Pride parades. A visible symbol that unified the various groups represented in the parades was needed. The first rainbow flag was used in the Gay Freedom Day march in San Francisco on June 25, 1978. The original eight-color design by Gay activist Gilbert Baker has since been simplified to six colors, but the original one is still sometimes used. As seen in these photos of a 2012 Gay Pride parade in San Francisco, the flag colors now show up in costumes and accessories as well as flags. As Gay Pride events spread internationally, so did the rainbow flag.

 



To identify oneself as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender carries a risk that should not be forgotten in the celebratory atmosphere of Gay Pride events. Early in the movement marchers prepared for the possibility of arrest by police or violence from opposing groups or onlookers. Many who “came out” also risked the loss of ties with family members and friends. The tragic mass shooting in Orlando, Florida on June 12, 2016 is a reminder to all Americans that violence towards the LGBTQ community continues to be of serious concern. The determination of participants in Gay Pride events to carry on this year in spite of the danger speaks to the continued courage and dedication of this generation’s marchers to the issue of LGBTQ equality.

We should also remember that great progress has been made in the struggle for Gay rights. Gay Pride marches celebrate not only progress toward fair treatment of LGBTQ citizens, but the American ideals of inclusiveness and strength in diversity as well.

 

YouTube: New York City Pride Parade Highlights

Pride Event Tips for Straight People

Vox: LGBTQ Pride Explained

Info: LGBTQ Protests and Demonstrations

Top Ten Best Pride Festivals

Reuters: Washington DC Gay Pride Draws Thousands

Advocate: Over 100 Photos From Palm Springs Pride

 

HOME

 


QUEER CAFE │ LGBTQ Information Network │ Established 2017 │ www.queercafe.net