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SAFE SEX

Planned Parenthood: Safer Sex

Condoms and Birth Control

Wikipedia: Safe Sex Defined

WebMD: Preventing STDs with Safe Sex

HIV Equal: 7 Different Ways to Have Safe Sex

Better Health: Safe Sex

Defining Safe Sex

 

Safe sex is sexual activity engaged in by people who have taken precautions to protect themselves against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as HIV. It is also referred to as safer sex or protected sex, while unsafe or unprotected sex is sexual activity engaged in without precautions, especially forgoing condom use. Some sources prefer the term safer sex to more precisely reflect the fact that these practices reduce, but do not always completely eliminate, the risk of disease transmission.

 

 

Safe sex practices became more prominent in the late 1980s as a result of the AIDS epidemic. Promoting safe sex is now one of the aims of sex education. Safe sex is regarded as a harm reduction strategy aimed at reducing risks. The risk reduction of safe sex is not absolute; for example, the reduced risk to the receptive partner of acquiring HIV from HIV-seropositive partners not wearing condoms compared to when they wear them is estimated to be about a four to fivefold.

 

Although some safe sex practices can be used as birth control (contraception), most forms of contraception do not protect against STIs (or STDs).  Likewise, some safe sex practices, like partner selection and low-risk sex behavior, are not effective forms of contraception but should be considered before engaging in any form of intercourse to reduce risk.

 

WebMD: Preventing STDs with Safe Sex

HIV Equal: 7 Different Ways to Have Safe Sex

Info: Health and Medical Concerns

Better Health: Safe Sex

Info: Sexual Activity

 

Safe Sex Information

 

Safe sex is all about protecting yourself and your partners from sexually transmitted infections. Safe sex helps you stay healthy and can even make sex better.

 

STDs are infections that are passed from one person to another during sexual activity. Anybody who has oral, anal, or vaginal sex, or genital skin-to-skin contact with another person can get STDs. Safe sex means taking steps to protect yourself and your partner from STDs when you have sex.

 

 

There are lots of ways you can make sex safer. One of the best ways is by using a barrier (like condoms, female condoms, dental dams) every single time you have oral, anal, or vaginal sex. Barriers cover parts of your genitals, protecting you and your partner from body fluids and some skin-to-skin contact, which can both spread STDs. 

 

Getting tested for STDs regularly is also part of safe sex, even if you always use condoms and feel totally fine. Most people with STDs donít have symptoms or know theyíre infected, and they can easily pass the infection to their partners. So testing is the only way to know for sure whether or not someone has an STD.

 

Getting tested protects you by letting you know if you DO have an STD, so you can get the right treatment to stay healthy and avoid giving it to other people.

 

 

Sticking to sexual activities that donít spread STDs (like outercourse or mutual masturbation) is a great way to safely get sexual pleasure and be intimate with another person. But if youíre taking off underwear and touching each other or having any kind of sex, using barriers is the safer way to go.

 

Another way to make sex safer is to avoid drinking too much alcohol or doing other drugs. Getting wasted can make you forget how important safer sex is, and you may accidentally make decisions that increase your chances of getting STDs. Itís also harder to use condoms correctly and remember other safer sex basics when youíre drunk or high.

 

The only way to be totally sure you wonít get an STD is to never have any kind of sexual contact with another person. But that doesnít work for the vast majority of people. Most of us are sexually intimate with other people at some point in our lives. So if youíre going to have sex, making it safe sex is the best way to help you avoid getting or passing an STD.

 

[Source: Planned Parenthood]

 

Planned Parenthood: Safer Sex

Info: AIDS/HIV

Condoms and Birth Control

Wikipedia: Safe Sex Defined

Info: Sexual Activity

 

How Do You Get STDs?

 

STDs are usually passed from one person to another during oral, anal, or vaginal sex. There are lots of different STDs. Some are carried in body fluids like semen, vaginal fluids, and blood. Others can be passed just from skin-to-skin touching with an infected body area. Using barriers like condoms and dams helps you avoid contact with fluids and some types of skin-to-skin contact during sex. So when you donít use condoms, your chance of getting an STD goes up.

 

 

All STDs can infect your genitals. Vaginal or anal sex without a condom has a high risk for passing:

 

--chlamydia

--gonorrhea

--syphilis

--HIV

--herpes

--HPV and genital warts

--hepatitis B

--pubic lice

--scabies

--trichomoniasis

 

Some STDs can also infect your lips, mouth, and throat. Oral sex without a condom or dam has a high risk for passing: herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea, HPV, hepatitis B.

 

Some STDs can be passed even if thereís only some skin on skin action with no fluids passed. Genital skin-to-skin contact can spread: herpes, HPV, pubic lice, scabies.

 

[Source: Planned Parenthood]

 

 

 WebMD: Preventing STDs with Safe Sex

Info: Health and Medical Concerns

HIV Equal: 7 Different Ways to Have Safe Sex

Info: AIDS/HIV

Better Health: Safe Sex

Info: Sexual Activity

 

Types of Safe Sex Activity

 

Are some kinds of sex safer than others? Yes. There are even a few totally risk-free ways to get sexual pleasure and be intimate with another person, like masturbating, and dry humping (grinding) with clothes on.

 

Low risk activities include kissing, touching your partnerís genitals with your hands, using sex toys with a partner, dry humping (grinding) without clothes, and oral sex. But itís still possible to get certain STDs from these things, so using condoms and dams to avoid contact with skin and fluids whenever you can helps you stay healthy.

 

 

Having vaginal or anal sex without a condom is super risky. You can get any and all STDs from unprotected vaginal or anal sex. The best way to protect yourself if youíre going to have vaginal or anal sex is use a condom every single time. Using lube with that condom also makes sex safer, especially anal sex.

 

When it comes to HIV, oral sex is much safer sex than vaginal or anal sex. But other infections, like herpes, syphilis, hepatitis B, gonorrhea, and HPV, can be passed during oral sex. So no matter what kind of sex you have, use condoms or dams to make it safer.

 

If I have an STD, how can I have safe sex?  If you find out that you have an STD, itís important to know how to have safe sex and avoid passing it on. Luckily, many STDs can be easily cured with medication, so once you finish treatment, you donít have to worry about giving your STD to anyone.

 

 

Planned Parenthood: Safer Sex

Condoms and Birth Control

Wikipedia: Safe Sex Defined

Info: Sexual Activity

 

And even though some STDs canít be cured, there are ways to treat your symptoms and help avoid giving your STD to people you have sex with. Depending on what STD you have, there are things you can do to protect your partners. Hereís a handy checklist:

 

--Always use condoms and dental dams during oral, anal, and vaginal sex ó whether or not you have an STD.

 

--Donít have sex at all if you have any STD symptoms (like sores or warts around your genitals, weird discharge from your penis, vagina or anus, or itching, pain, irritation and/or swelling in your penis, vagina, vulva, or anus).

 

--Go see a doctor or nurse so they can start treating your STD as soon as possible.

 

 

 

--If you have a curable STD (like gonorrhea, chlamydia, or syphilis), take all of your medication the way your doctor tells you to, even if your symptoms go away sooner. The infection stays in your body until you totally finish the treatment. Your partner(s) should also be treated at the same time. Donít have sex at all until you both finish your treatment, and your doctor or nurse says itís OK.

 

--If you have an STD that canít be cured (like HIV or herpes), talk with your doctor about medicines that can help lower your chances of spreading it to a partner. Depending on what STD you have and where it is, you may need to use condoms/dams every time you have oral, anal, and/or vaginal sex.

 

--Always tell your sexual partners that you have an STD before you have sex, so you can work together to make a safe sex plan and help prevent it from spreading. Itís not the easiest conversation, but itís an important one.

 

[Source: Planned Parenthood]

 

 

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