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SEXUAL DISORDERS

 

Global Prevention Project

Psych Central: Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Disorders

Sex Offender Defined

Minor Attracted Persons: Facts and Fallacies

WebMD: Is Sex Addiction Real?

Rebranding Pedophiles Won't Make Them Less Deplorable

How to Spot a Sexual Predator

 

Disorders, Offences, and Crimes


Among examples of non-standard sexuality, that are not under the LGBTQ umbrella or part of the queer community, are behaviors that can be defined as disorders, dysfunctions, addictions, offences, and crimes. Sex offenders, sex predators, and other sex criminals that fall into this category are represented by those who engage in pedophilia, sexual abuse, sexual assault, sexual imposition, sexual harassment,
exhibitionism, voyeurism, obscenity, pornography, incest, and rape. These acts can be described as inappropriate, illicit, indecent, harmful, destructive, pathological, or illegal. They often represent a diagnosable mental illness, typically manifest by obsessive or compulsive behavior.

 

Homophobes and other detractors have, for decades, tried to associate gay men, lesbians, same-sex relationships or homosexuality with pedophilia, child sexual abuse, bestiality, bigamy, polygamy, adultery and incest. Homosexuality and/or being gay is not synonymous with these acts or behaviors. These associations often are used to suggest that lesbians and gay men pose a threat to society, to families, and to children in particular. Such suggestions are defamatory, ignorant, dishonest, and mean-spirited.

 

 

Pedophilia and Minor Attracted Persons


Pedophilia is a psychological disorder (dysfunctional sexual fetish) in which an adult experiences a sexual preference for and engages in sexual relations with children. Pedophiles, therefore, perform activities that are inappropriate and illegal. Pedophiles are especially egregious in that they are attracted to a vulnerable population and commit acts that are non-consensual. Recently, the term "Minor Attracted Persons" has been used as a label for pedophiles. Regardless of what label is used, any kind of child molestation is considered a disorder and a crime.
 

Neither pedophilia or MAP (Minor Attracted Person) is a sexual identity or orientation. Sexual identity is about gender or sex. Defined as a sexual disorder, mental illness, and sex crime, MAP is not part of the LGBTQ community and is not under the queer umbrella. "Minor Attracted Person" or MAP is a widely acknowledged term used in the global Sex Offender Research and Sex Offender Treatment Community. To be clear, this is not an invented term of convenience, nor is it a term used to rebrand pedophiles or link them to the LGBTQ community. It is used by clinicians as a way to identify individuals who need help.

 

Beyond efforts to provide assistance to individuals with this disorder, "MAP Positivity" or "MAP Pride" is otherwise not okay as a practice. There should not be, in any sense, any effort to normalize or legitimize such behavior. A person who identifies as MAP is a pedophile and the activity they engage in is criminal. Their behavior is correctly described as child assault, child molestation, and child sexual abuse.  As individuals who pursue and engage in sex with underage minors (children below the age of consent), they are considered sexual predators or sexual criminals.

 

The term "NOMAP," or Non-Offending (Non-Contact) Minor Attracted Person, refers to a MAP who is committed to not acting on their sexual attraction in ways that harm actual children, such as perpetrating child sexual abuse or consuming child pornography. They recognize their disorder and agree not to engage in inappropriate or illegal acts.

 

You might also see "MAP" and "NOMAP" used as personal descriptors or identifiers on social media. Such use has stirred up some well-deserved controversy and major pushback.

 

Global Prevention Project

Sex Offender Defined

Pedophiles Rebranding Themselves on Social Media

Minor Attracted Persons: Facts and Fallacies

Stop It Now: Preventing Sexual Abuse of Children

What are Chronophiles?

New Hope for Sex Offender Treatment

Rebranding Pedophiles Won't Make Them Less Deplorable

Child Molestation Research and Prevention

Thinking Processes of Sexual Predators

Disturbing World of MAPS

How to Spot a Sexual Predator

 

 

Age Related Paraphilia

--Chronophilia - Umbrella term for all age-related paraphilias.

--AOA - Age Of Attraction

--Pedophilia - Psychological disorder in which an adult or older adolescent experiences a sexual preference for children.

--Infantophilia (Nepiophilia) - Sexual preference for children less than 5 years old (including toddlers and infants).

--Pedophile - Individual attracted to a pre-pubescent child (1-10)
--Hebephile - Individual attracted to a pubescent child (tween, age 11-14)
--Ephebophile - Individual attracted to a post-pubescent child (teen, age 15-19)

--Attraction - Regardless of whether you believe attractions are chosen or innate, the point is that these terms define an attraction, not a behavior. This kind of attraction is sometimes referred to as a "toxic crush." The behavior (and acting on these attractions) is the sexual abuse of children.

--Eleiophile - Person who is sexually attracted to adults.
--Gerontophilia - Primary sexual attraction to the elderly. A person with such a sexual preference is a gerontophile.
--MATA - Minor Attracted to Adults

--Pedo - Slang term for pedophile.

 

 

Global Prevention Project

Sex Offender Defined

Pedophiles Rebranding Themselves on Social Media

Minor Attracted Persons: Facts and Fallacies

Stop It Now: Preventing Sexual Abuse of Children

What are Chronophiles?

New Hope for Sex Offender Treatment

Rebranding Pedophiles Won't Make Them Less Deplorable

Child Molestation Research and Prevention

Thinking Processes of Sexual Predators

Disturbing World of MAPS

How to Spot a Sexual Predator

 

MAP and LGBTQ

 

MAP stands for “minor attracted person”, which refers to a person who is romantically and/or sexually attracted to people who are under the age of consent and at least 5 years younger than they are. It’s an umbrella term covering nepiophilia, pedophilia, ephebophilia and hebephilia.

NOMAP stands for “non-offending minor attracted person”, and refers to a MAP who is committed to not acting on their sexual attraction in ways that harm actual children, such as perpetrating child sexual abuse or consuming child pornography. It’s believed that most MAPs are NOMAPs, whether or not they specifically use this term.

While MAPs can be anywhere on the LGBTQ spectrum in addition to being MAPs (for example a gay man attracted to both men and boys, or a transgender person who is attracted to children), very few MAPs are arguing for inclusion under the LGBTQ umbrella because they are MAPs. For the most part, MAPs agree that their goals are different - they want to be accepted because they don’t act on their sexual orientation, while LGBTQ people want to be accepted and allowed to express their sexual orientation and/or gender identity.

However, there’s a long tradition of trying to attack LGBTQ people by comparing them to MAPs and implying that they’re a danger to children, and some anti-LGBTQ trolls have recently taken to trying to claim that MAPs are trying to be considered LGBTQ in order to feed into this negative stereotype. In addition, a few MAPs, particularly ‘pro-contact’ MAPs (who believe that it’s possible for an adult to have sex with a child in a way that doesn’t risk psychological harm to the child), would like to be considered LGBTQ in the hopes of gaining more acceptance.

I admit, I don’t fully understand the pushback against MAPs. As a child sexual abuse survivor, I find the existence of NOMAPs and the anti-contact MAP community encouraging, and hope that they will help prevent future children from suffering as I did.

However, I think a lot of people buy into rape myths where sexual desire is perceived as uncontrollable and inevitably leading to action, which would suggest that a MAP is like a ticking time bomb who will eventually offend. This myth also underlies the idea that a rapist is less responsible if the victim led him on or if he (and it’s usually men this is applied to) couldn’t find anyone to have consensual sex with.

In addition, some people make moral decisions out of disgust rather than simply based on assessments of likely harm, and most people find the thought of being sexually attracted to children disgusting. Which doesn’t make sense to me, since personally I find most sex acts disgusting, and yet I’m politically sex-positive.
 

[Source: Ettina Satot, Sexual abuse survivor and psych student with interest in criminal psychology, Jan 2019]

 

 

MAP and Pedophilia

 

MAP (Minor Attracted Person) is a more comprehensive term than pedophile, as it also includes adolescents and teenagers. NOMAP is “non-offending MAP”, someone who is committed to not doing anything inappropriate or illegal and thus keeping children safe.

 

Very few MAPs are aligning themselves with LGBTQ groups. While a few trolls and self-styled activists are trying to make minor-attraction part of the LGBTQ lineup, most MAPs, who are heterosexual and cisgender, have no desire to join with what they see as the gay community because they have practically nothing in common with them. What they do have in common is having a non-standard sexuality.

 

Pushback from the LGBTQ community about the use of the MAP term is due to the idea that it would promote the erroneous idea that many homosexuals are also pedophiles or child molesters.  Also, some clinicians want to avoid the erroneous idea that all pedophiles are child molesters. In fact, about 3–5% of gay men have pedophilia (less for women), about 5–15% of pedophiles are homosexual, most child abuse is carried out by people who don’t have pedophilia, and most pedophiles don’t molest children.

[Source: Laurence Taylor, Mental Health Specialist]

 


 

MAP and Sex Offenders

 

Some of the most notorious child-sex offenders are using mainstream websites such as YouTube, Twitter and Instagram to rebrand pedophilia as a harmless sexual preference. Hundreds of disturbing accounts are being set up every day which refer to both potential and prolific abusers as MAPs (Minor-Attracted Persons) to escape the stigma attached to the word pedophile.

 

The anonymous users have even created their own MAP Pride flag, with some arguing they should be celebrated as a niche group alongside the LGBTQ community. LGBTQ-style slogans such as "MAP Pride" and "MAP Positivity" are seen as an attempt to cast pedophilia as part of society’s wider move towards sexual liberation.

Material found online seeks to communicate the message that pedophilia is natural and that MAPs should be able to date minors. Profiles of the anonymous users, which use cartoon avatars rather than photographs, often list the ages of children they are most attracted to, in some cases as low as two to seven.

One gay rights campaigner said that they are a fiendish group of sub-humans and they will find no haven in the LGBTQ community. We utterly rebuke their delusional and evil claims.

The horrifying propaganda has chilling echoes of the Pedophile Information Exchange (PIE) campaign in the 1970s and 80s which piggy-backed on the gay liberation movement to push for pro-child abuse policies, such as lowering the age of consent to just four.
 

[Source: Katherine Denkinson, UK Daily Mail, June 2020]

 

Global Prevention Project

Sex Offender Defined

Pedophiles Rebranding Themselves on Social Media

Minor Attracted Persons: Facts and Fallacies

Stop It Now: Preventing Sexual Abuse of Children

What are Chronophiles?

New Hope for Sex Offender Treatment

Rebranding Pedophiles Won't Make Them Less Deplorable

Child Molestation Research and Prevention

Thinking Processes of Sexual Predators

Disturbing World of MAPS

How to Spot a Sexual Predator

 

 

Sex Offender

A sexual offender (also sex offender, sex abuser, or sexual abuser) is a person who has committed a sex crime. What constitutes a sex crime differs by culture and by legal jurisdiction. Most jurisdictions compile their laws into sections such as sexual trafficking and sexual assault. The majority of convicted sex offenders have convictions for crimes of a sexual nature. Some sex offenders have simply violated a law contained in a sexual category.

Some of the titles of crimes which usually result in a mandatory sex-offender classification include second prostitution conviction, sending or receiving obscene content in the form of text messages (sexting), relationships between young adults and teenagers that have resulted in corruption of a minor, and any sexual contact made by the adult to the minor (child molestation). If sexual conduct occurs, unlawful sexual conduct involving a minor occurs.

Other serious offences are sexual assault, statutory rape, child sexual abuse, rape, sexual imposition, and pandering obscenity.

 

Sex Crimes: Sex and the Law

RAINN: Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network

Sexual Assault: Defined and Explained

Facts About Sexual Offenders

Statutory Rape: Defined and Explained

Psychiatric Times: Ramifications of Incest

Sexual Harassment: Defined and Explained

 

Sexual Predator

The term sexual predator is used pejoratively to describe a person seen as obtaining or trying to obtain sexual contact with another person in a metaphorically "predatory" manner. Analogous to how a predator hunts down its prey, so the sexual predator is thought to "hunt" for his or her sex partners. People who commit sex crimes, such as rape or child sexual abuse, are commonly referred to as sexual predators.

The term is applied according to a person's moral beliefs, and does not necessarily denote criminal behavior. For example, a person who cruises a bar looking for consensual sex from someone else could be considered a sexual predator by some.
 

The term "sexual predator" is often considered distinct from "sex offender." Many US states also see these differences legally. A sexual offender is a person who has committed a sexual offense. A sexual predator is often used to refer to a person who habitually seeks out sexual situations that are deemed exploitative. However, in some states, the term "sexual predator" is applied to anyone who has been convicted of certain crimes, regardless of whether or not there is a history of similar behavior.

 

Sex Crimes: Sex and the Law

RAINN: Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network

Sexual Assault: Defined and Explained

Facts About Sexual Offenders

Statutory Rape: Defined and Explained

Psychiatric Times: Ramifications of Incest

Sexual Harassment: Defined and Explained

 

Common Sex Crimes

-- Rape
-- Lust murder
-- Any forms of sexual abuse or sexual assault
-- Child sexual abuse
-- Statutory rape
-- Spousal/partner rape
-- Obscenity
-- Human trafficking
-- Frotteurism (sexual arousal through rubbing one's self against a non-consenting stranger in public)
-- Exhibitionism (indecent exposure)
-- Voyeurism (peeping tom)
-- Incest
-- Telephone scatologia (Obscene telephone calls for the purpose of sexual arousal)
-- Sex with animals
-- Sexual harassment
-- Prostitution or pimping
-- Pornography

-- Extramarital sex

-- Polygamy

 

 

Sex Crimes

Sex crimes are forms of human sexual behavior that are considered criminal offenses. Someone who commits one is said to be a sex offender. Some sex crimes are crimes of violence that involve sex. Others are violations of social taboos, such as incest, indecent exposure, or exhibitionism. There is much variation among cultures as to what is considered a crime or not, and in what ways or to what extent crimes are punished.

As a general rule, the law in many countries often intervenes in sexual activity involving young or adolescent children below the legal age of consent, non-consensual deliberate displays or illicit watching of sexual activity, sex with close relatives (incest), harm to animals, acts involving the deceased (necrophilia), and also when there is harassment, nuisance, fear, injury, or assault of a sexual nature, or serious risk of abuse of certain professional relationships.

Separately, the law usually regulates or controls the censorship of pornographic or obscene materials as well. A rape charge is issued when a person of any age does not provide consent for sexual activity.

 

Sex Crimes: Sex and the Law

RAINN: Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network

Sexual Assault: Defined and Explained

Facts About Sexual Offenders

Statutory Rape: Defined and Explained

Psychiatric Times: Ramifications of Incest

Sexual Harassment: Defined and Explained

 

 

Sex Addiction

The term "sexual addiction" is used to describe the behavior of a person who has an unusually intense sex drive or an obsession with sex. It is sometimes referred to as sexual dependency or sexual compulsivity (or impulsivity). Sex and the thought of sex tend to dominate the sex addict's thinking, making it difficult to work or engage in healthy personal relationships.

Sex addicts engage in distorted thinking, often rationalizing and justifying their behavior and blaming others for problems. They generally deny they have a problem and make excuses for their actions.

Sexual addiction also is associated with risk-taking. A person with a sex addiction engages in various forms of sexual activity, despite the potential for negative and/or dangerous consequences. In addition to damaging the addict's relationships and interfering with his or her work and social life, a sexual addiction also puts the person at risk for emotional and physical injury.

Generally, a person with a sex addiction gains little satisfaction from the sexual activity and forms no emotional bond with his or her sex partners. In addition, the problem of sex addiction often leads to feelings of guilt and shame. A sex addict also feels a lack of control over the behavior, despite negative consequences (financial, health, social, and emotional).

For some people, the sex addiction progresses to involve illegal activities, such as exhibitionism (exposing oneself in public), making obscene phone calls, or molestation. However, it should be noted that sex addicts do not necessarily become sex offenders.

Are you a sexual addict? How often do you purchase sexually explicit magazines? Are you preoccupied with sex? Do you feel that your sexual behavior is abnormal? Does your spouse ever complain about your sexual behavior? Do you often feel badly about your sexual behavior? Do you hide aspects of your sexual behavior from your partner? Has your sexual behavior ever interfered with your family life? Have you been unable to stop your sexual behavior even though you know it's inappropriate?

 

Medicine Net: Sexual Addiction

Psych Central: What is Sexual Addiction?

WebMD: Is Sex Addiction Real?

Sexual Addiction Defined

Mayo Clinic: Society's Sex Addiction Problem

Psych Central: Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Disorders

Healthy Sexual Solutions: For Addicts and Offenders


 

Behaviors Associated With Sexual Addiction

-- Compulsive masturbation (self-stimulation)
-- Multiple affairs (extra-marital affairs)
-- Multiple or anonymous sexual partners and/or one-night stands
-- Consistent use of pornography
-- Unsafe sex
-- Phone or computer sex (cybersex)
-- Prostitution or use of prostitutes
-- Exhibitionism
-- Obsessive dating through personal ads
-- Voyeurism (watching others)
-- Stalking (following and watching others)
-- Sexual harassment
-- Molestation

 



Patterns and Examples of Sexual Addiction

-- Fantasy sex: Neglecting commitments because of fantasy life, masturbation.
-- Seductive role sex: Extramarital affairs (heterosexual or homosexual), flirting and seductive behavior.
-- Anonymous sex: Engaging in sex with anonymous partners, having one night stands.
-- Paying for sex: Paying prostitutes for sex, paying for sexually explicit phone calls.
-- Trading sex: Receiving money or drugs for sex.
-- Voyeuristic sex: Patronizing adult bookstores and strip shows, looking through windows of houses, having a collection of pornography at home or at work.
-- Exhibitionist sex: Exposing oneself in public places or from the home or car, wearing clothes designed to expose.
-- Intrusive sex: Touching others without permission, using position of power (professional, religious) to sexually exploit another person, rape.
-- Pain exchange: Causing or receiving pain to enhance sexual pleasure.
-- Object sex: Masturbating with objects, cross-dressing to add to sexual pleasure, using fetishes as part of sexual rituals, having sex with animals.
-- Sex with children: Forcing sexual activity on a child, watching child pornography.

 

Medicine Net: Sexual Addiction

Psych Central: What is Sexual Addiction?

WebMD: Is Sex Addiction Real?

Sexual Addiction Defined

Mayo Clinic: Society's Sex Addiction Problem

Psych Central: Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Disorders

Healthy Sexual Solutions: For Addicts and Offenders

 



Sexual Addiction or Hypersexual Disorder

Sexual addiction, which is also known as hypersexual disorder, has largely been ignored by psychiatrists, even though the condition causes serious psychosocial problems for many people. A lack of empirical evidence on sexual addiction is the result of the disease's complete absence from versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

However, people who were categorized as having a compulsive, impulsive, addictive sexual disorder or a hypersexual disorder reported having obsessive thoughts and behaviors as well as sexual fantasies. Existing prevalence rates of sexual addiction-related disorders range from 3% to 6%. Sexual addiction/ hypersexual disorder is used as an umbrella construct to encompass various types of problematic behaviors, including excessive masturbation, cybersex, pornography use, sexual behavior with consenting adults, telephone sex, strip club visitation, and other behaviors.

The adverse consequences of sexual addiction are similar to the consequences of other addictive disorders. Addictive, somatic and psychiatric disorders coexist with sexual addiction. In recent years, research on sexual addiction has proliferated, and screening instruments have increasingly been developed to diagnose or quantify sexual addiction disorders.


[Source: Karila, Wéry, Weinstein, Cottencin, Petit, Reynaud, Billieux]

 

Medicine Net: Sexual Addiction

Psych Central: What is Sexual Addiction?

WebMD: Is Sex Addiction Real?

Sexual Addiction Defined

Mayo Clinic: Society's Sex Addiction Problem

Psych Central: Sex, Sexuality, and Sexual Disorders

Healthy Sexual Solutions: For Addicts and Offenders

 

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