LGBTQ INFORMATION NETWORK │ RAINBOW OF RESOURCES

TELEVISION

 

Dancing with the Stars: JoJo Siwa’s Viennese Waltz
Strictly Come Dancing: LGBTQ Fans Blown Away by History-Making Same-Sex Dance
Billy Porter Is Attitude Magazine's Man of the Year

Elvira, Cassandra Peterson, Comes Out, Talks 19-Year Relationship
Bowen Yang: The Queering of SNL

L Word Generation Q: Season Two Premiere (Entire Episode)

Lance Bass Wants to Host a Season of ‘The Bachelor’ with LGBTQ Contestants
JoJo Siwa will Compete on Dancing with the Stars with Same-Sex Partner
Music, Movies, Media: Celebrate LGBTQ Pride

GLAAD Media Awards: Who Are the Big Winners?

High School Musical: Gay Love Song

Sesame Street Features Married Gay Couple with Daughter

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation


 

Sex And The City: Actor Willie Garson Dies At Age 57
Hacks: Advancing Bisexual Representation on TV
L Word: Jillian Mercado on Repping Queer Disabled Latinx Visibility
Best LGBTQ Television Shows of 2020

Schitt's Creek: Letter From Moms

It's a Sin: New Perspective in Familiar Territory

Dickinson Star Ella Hunt Comes Out as Queer
Niecy Nash Marries Jessica Betts

Bingeworthy Queer TV Shows

Veneno: Bringing a Trans Icon to Life

Star Trek Discovery Features Trans and Non-Binary Characters

Becoming You: New Docuseries About Gender Fluid Kids

Jesse James Keitel: Non-Binary Actor Makes TV History

Advocate Interview: Dominique Provost-Chalkley

David and Patrick: Simply the Best

Ross Matthew: Journey From Small Town Boy to Out in the City

 

LGBTQ Media Portrayal

 

Historically, the portrayals of LGBTQ communities in media have been negative, reflecting the cultural intolerance of LGBTQ individuals; however, from the 1990s to present day, there has been an increase in the depictions of LGBTQ people, issues, and concerns within mainstream media in North America. The LGBTQ communities have taken an increasingly proactive stand in defining their own culture with a primary goal of achieving an affirmative visibility in mainstream media. The positive portrayal or increased presence of the LGBTQ communities in media has served to increase acceptance and support for LGBTQ communities, establish LGBTQ communities as a norm, and provide information on the topic.

 



Although lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals are generally indistinguishable from their straight or cisgender counterparts, media depictions of LGBTQ individuals often represent them as visibly and behaviorally different. For example, in many forms of popular entertainment, gay men are portrayed stereotypically as promiscuous, flashy, flamboyant, and bold, while the reverse is often true of how lesbians are portrayed. Media representations of bisexual and transgender people tend to either completely erase them, or depict them as morally corrupt or mentally unstable. Similar to race-, religion-, and class-based caricatures, these stereotypical stock character representations vilify or make light of marginalized and misunderstood groups.

Gay and lesbian families are commonly misrepresented in media because society frequently equates sexual orientation with the ability to reproduce. As well, gay and lesbian characters are rarely the main character in movies; they frequently play the role of stereotyped supporting characters or are portrayed as a victim or villain.

There is currently a widespread view that references to gay people should be omitted from child-related entertainment. When such references do occur they almost invariably generate controversy. In 1997, when American comedian Ellen DeGeneres came out of the closet on her popular sitcom, many sponsors, such as the Wendy's fast-food chain, pulled their advertising.

 



Media depictions have both benefited and disadvantaged LGBTQ communities. Milestones to the lesbian and gay communities such as the book Vice Versa and DeGeneres coming out have encouraged other LGBTQ people to come out and feel better about being themselves.

Despite the stereotypical depictions of gay people, the media has at times promoted acceptance with television shows such as Will and Grace and Queer Eye. The increased publicity reflects the coming-out movement of LGBTQ communities. As more celebrities come out, more LGBTQ-friendly shows develop, such as the 2004 show The L Word. With the popularity of gay television shows, music artists and gay fashion, Western culture has had to open its eyes to the gay community.

 

Ladies From L Word Sing Love Shack

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation

2020 GLAAD Media Report: Queer Women Outnumbered Queer Men on TV

LGBTQ Television Characters That Broke Barriers

See Yourself, Be Yourself: Queer Celebs Join Panel on LGBTQ+ Visibility

Special: Gay Disabled Comedy TV Series

B. Scott on BET: First Trans Non-Binary Host and Producer

Actors Justice Smith and Nicholas Ashe Come Out as Boyfriends

 

Elvira, Cassandra Peterson, Comes Out, Talks 19-Year Relationship

Cassandra Peterson (best known to the world as Elvira, Mistress of the Dark) released her new memoir Yours Cruelly, Elvira today and, in the process, came out by revealing her 19-year relationship with another woman, Teresa “T” Wierson.

Their relationship began, as all the best do, at the Hollywood Gold’s Gym when Peterson spotted who she thought at the time was the hottest bad boy in Tinseltown. “Often, when I was doing my preworkout warm-up on the treadmill, I couldn’t help noticing one particular trainer (tan, tattooed, and muscular) stalking across the gym floor, knit cap pulled so low over his long brown hair that it nearly covered his eyes,” she writes in the book. “Dark and brooding, he gave off such intense energy that when he crossed the enormous gym floor, the waters parted and people stopped in their tracks to stare.”

It wasn’t until they had a chance encounter in the ladies room that she realized her “bad boy” was really a “bad girl” and the two soon became close, albeit platonically. The friendship only became romantic following the end of Peterson’s 25-year marriage to (singer turned her manager) Mark Pierson. As Peterson tells it in her book, the path to a more serious connection began with Wierson arriving at her home one rainy night, also freshly out of a relationship. “There on the doorstep stood my trainer, T, holding a trash bag full of her belongings, looking sad and bedraggled. She’d split from her longtime partner, spent some time in rehab, and now had no place to go.”

 



The two lived together and took care of one another through a really challenging time and, in the process, something began to shift. One night, after they were out at a movie, Peterson felt a sudden desire to kiss Wierson. “I think I was even more surprised. What the hell was I doing? I’d never been interested in women as anything other than friends. I felt so confused. This just wasn’t me! I was stunned that I’d been friends with her for so many years and never noticed our chemistry,” she writes. “I soon discovered that we connected sexually in a way I’d never experienced.” She quickly realized she was falling in love with T.

The two have been together for more than 19 years now, with Wierson taking on the role of Peterson’s assistant. They had to keep the relationship quiet because, as Peterson writes, the couple felt they had to protect the Elvira brand. “Would my fans hate me for not being what they expected me to be?” she shares in the book, adding, “I’m very aware that there will be some who will be disappointed and maybe even angry, but I have to live with myself, and at this point in my life, I’ve got to be truthful about who I am.”

And Peterson’s truth? She writes that she’s never been happier. “For the first time in my life,” she writes, “I’m with someone who makes me feel safe, blessed, and truly loved.”

Yours Cruelly, Elvira is out now.

[Source: Rachel Shatto, Advocate, Sept 2021]

 

It's a Sin: HIV Drama Opens Old Wounds

Star Trek Actor Mary Wiseman: Queer and Proud

Javicia Leslie: New Batwoman is Black and Bisexual

Teen Sensation JoJo Siwa: Comes Out and Changes the World for LGBTQ Youth

Glee Star Naya Rivera Dies at 33: Her Profound Queer Legacy

1996 TV: Living Single, Queen Latifah, and Same-Sex Marriage

Winners of GLAAD Media Awards

Betty White at 2012 GLAAD Media Awards

Naya Rivera: Her Glee Performances Helped Change Queer TV History


 

LGBTQ Television

 

Storylines and characters of interest to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer people can be found in significant numbers on television via broadcast, cable, and streaming venues. This is a partial list of television shows that feature LGBTQ characters, storylines, situations, and themes.

 

2018-2021

 

Tampa Baes (2021)

Eden (2021)

Master of None (2021)

It's a Sin (2021)

Good Trouble (2021)

Batwoman (2021)

Big Sky (2020)

Transhood (2020)

Hollywood (2020)

Love Victor (2020)

Ratched (2020)

Euphoria (2020)

First Day (2020)

Difficult People (2020)
Flunk (2020)

The Fortnight (2020)

Feel Good (2020)

911 Lone Star (2020)

Tiger King (2020)

High Fidelity (2020)

Blood and Water (2020)

I'm Not Okay With This (2020)

Hunters (2020)

Katy Keene (2020)

Council of Dads (2020)

Party of Five (2020)

Never Have I Ever (2020)

Utopia Falls (2020)

Deputy (2020)

Dickinson (2019)

The Other Two

The Politician (2019)

Unbelievable (2019)

Titans (2019)

The Connors (2019)

Special (2019)

All American (2019)

Dead to Me (2019)

Stumptown (2019)

The Deuce (2019)

Elite (2019)

Batwoman (2019)

Mrs. Fletcher (2019)

Umbrella Academy (2019)

Trinkets (2019)

Good Trouble (2019)

Pose (2019)

Broad City (2019)

My House (2018)

Out in Left Field (2018)

Instinct (2018)

Vida (2018)

Million Little Things (2018)

Gentleman Jack (2018)

 

 

Best LGBTQ Television Shows of 2020

Joe Exotic Movie: Starring John Cameron Mitchell and Kate McKinnon
Sarah Paulson Wins Emmy Award

Hottest Way Haught Moments From Wyonna Earp

Schitt's Creek Very Happy Ending: David and Patrick

Trinkets: Queer and Non-Binary Visibility

Advocate: LGBTQ TV Shows for 2020

The Good Place Star: Jameela Jamil Comes Out as Queer

Dex and Fiona: Scenes From Stumptown

Ellen DeGeneres and Jennifer Aniston Kiss

Best Gay TV Couples of All Time

Perfect Playlist: Best High Fidelity Moments

Visible: Out on Television

Dominique Provost-Chalkley: Her Journey to Coming Out

IMDB: Television Shows with LGBTQ Main Characters

 

2012-2017

 

The Good Fight (2017)

When We Rise (2017)

Raising Hope (2017)

13 Reasons Why (2017)

One Day at a Time (2016)

Same Same (2016)

Finding Prince Charming (2016)

Exes and Ohs (2016)

Degrassi: Next Class (2016)

Gaycation (2016)

Schitt's Creek (2015)

Super Girl (2015)

Skam (2015)

Cheetah in August (2015)

Sense 8 (2015)

Cucumber (2015)

Grace and Frankie (2015)

Transparent (2014)

Looking (2014)

Sirens (2014)

How to Get Away With Murder (2014)

Faking It (2014)

It Got Better (2014)

Please Like Me (2013)

Orange is the New Black (2013)

Wentworth (2013)

The Fosters (2013)

Steven Universe (2013)

Brooklyn Nine-Nine (2013)

New Normal (2012)

 

 

 

Critical Media Project: LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Golden Globes: Ellen DeGeneres Receives Achievement in Television Award

Fall 2019 TV Season: Shows for LGBTQ Viewers

Will & Grace Celebrate Pride Month

Wikipedia: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People

What If Chandler Had Been Gay on Friends TV Series
Advocate: Most Important LGBTQ TV Shows of the Decade

Jennifer Beals Receives GLSEN Respect Awards Champion Honor

Zoe Kravitz: High Fidelity Kiss Scene

Entertainment Weekly: LGBTQ Pride Forever Issue

Golden Globes: Kate McKinnon's Tribute to Ellen DeGeneres

Best LGBTQ Media Moments of the Decade

Tig Notaro and Sarah Paulson on Jimmy Fallon Show

Schitt's Creek Very Happy Ending: David and Patrick

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Advocate: LGBTQ TV Shows for 2020

The Good Place Star: Jameela Jamil Comes Out as Queer

IMDB: Television Shows with LGBTQ Main Characters

Critical Media Project: LGBTQ Representation in the Media

 

2005-2011

 

Shameless (2011)

Threesome (2011)

Happy Endings (2011)

Adventure Time (2010)

Pretty Little Liars (2010)

Modern Family (2009)

Glee (2009)

United States of Tara (2009)

RuPaul's Drag Race (2009)

Being Erica (2009)

True Blood (2008)

90210 (2008)

Sordid Lives (2008)

The Lair (2007)

Big Gay Sketch Show (2007)

Skins (2007)

Torchwood (2006)

Brothers and Sisters (2006)

Ugly Betty (2006)

Line of Beauty (2006)

Noah’s Arc (2005)

Dante's Cove (2005)

South of Nowhere (2005)

 

 

 

1972-2004

 

The L Word (2004)

Queer Eye for Straight Guy (2003)

Reno 911 (2003)

Degrassi: Next Generation (2001)

Six Feet Under (2001)

Queer as Folk (2000)

Sex & The City (1998)

Will & Grace (1998)

Oz (1997)

Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997)

Tales of the City (1993)

In The Life (1992)

Brothers (1984)

Love Sidney (1981)

Soap (1977)

Corner Bar (1972)

 

Advocate Interview: Dominique Provost-Chalkley

Golden Globes: Ellen DeGeneres Receives Achievement in Television Award

Big List of TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

IMDB: Timeline of LGBTQ Couples in TV History

Top Ten Groundbreaking Moments for LGBTQ TV Characters

Sarah Paulson Wins Emmy Award

Highest Paid LGBTQ TV Stars in Hollywood

Schitt's Creek Very Happy Ending: David and Patrick

Special: Gay Disabled Comedy TV Series

High Fidelity: What LGBTQ Representation Should Look Like

HRC Award Presented to Nicole Maines

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation

GLAAD Media Report 2019-20: Where We Are on Television

 

 

LGBTQ Television Actors

 

Neil Patrick Harris (How I Met Your Mother)

Luke McFarlane (Bothers & Sisters)

Chad Allen (Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman)

Dan Bucatinsky (Scandal)

Jim Parsons (Big Bang Theory)

Sophie Turner (Game of thrones)

Guillermo Diaz (Scandal)

Dan Butler (Frasier)

Lily Tomlin (Grace & Frankie, Laugh In)

Ellen Page (Gaycation)

Alan Cumming (Instinct)

Billy Porter (Pose)

Tan France (Queer Eye)

Nicole Maines (Super Girl)

Leslie Jordan (Will & Grace)

Zoe Kravitz (High Fidelity)

Aubrey Plaza (Parks and Recreation)

Niecy Nash (Reno 911, Claws)

Javicia Leslie (Batwoman)

Cassandra Peterson (Elvira)

 

 

Jesse James Keitel (Big Sky)

Bowen Yang (Saturday Night Live)

Mary Wiseman (StarTrek Discovery)

Dominique Provost-Chalkley (Wynonna Earp)

Taylor Schilling (Orange is the New Black)

Joe Exotic (Tiger King)

Dino Petrera (Never Have I Ever)

Dan Levy (Schitt's Creek)

Indya Moore (Pose)

Jameela Jamil (The Good Place)

Justice Smith (Pokemon: Detective Pikachu, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom)

Nicholas Ashe (Queen Sugar)

Chris Colfer (Glee)

Ricky Martin (The Voice)

Jane Lynch (Glee)

Craig Chester (True Blood)

Kate McKinnon (Saturday Night Live)

Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family)

BD Wong (Law & Order: SVU)

Anderson Cooper (Anderson Cooper 360)

Laverne Cox (Orange is the New Black)

 

 

Robert Gant (Queer as Folk)

Cynthia Nixon (Sex and the City)

Graham Norton (Graham Norton Show)

John Glover (Smallville)

Ben Platt (The Politician)

Reid Ewing (Modern Family)

Rick Cosnett (The Flash)

Chyler Leigh (Grey's Anatomy)

Jake Borelli (Grey's Anatomy)

Randy Harrison (Queer as Folk)

Robin Roberts (Good Morning America)

Sean Hayes (Will & Grace)

Rachel Maddow (Rachel Maddow Show)

TR Knight (Grey’s Anatomy)

Ellen DeGeneres (Ellen)

Eric Millegan (Bones)

Jai Rodriguez (Queer Eye)

Adamo Ruggiero (Degrassi: The Next Generation)

Matt Bomer (Titans)

Ella Hunt (Dickinson)

 

 

Sara Gilbert (Big Bang Theory, Roseanne)

Nathan Lane (Modern Family)

David Hyde Pierce (Frasier)

Rosie O’Donnell (The View)

Portia de Rossi (Arrested Development, Ally McBeal)

George Takei (Star Trek)

Sara Ramirez (Grey's Anatomy)

Scott Thompson (Kids in the Hall)

Carrie Brownstein (Portlandia)

Suze Orman (Suze Orman Show)

David Ogden Stiers (M*A*S*H)

Meredith Baxter (Family Ties)

Gillian Anderson (X Files)

Raven-Symone (The View, Blackish, Cosby Show)

Jim Nabors (Gomer Pyle USMC)

Robert Reed (Brady Bunch)

Dick Sargent (Bewitched)

 

 

Anderson Cooper: Being Gay is One of the Greatest Blessings of My Life

How The L Word Changed Lesbian Television

OITNB: Tribute to Lauren and Taylor

Advocate: Most Important LGBTQ TV Shows of the Decade

Golden Globes: Kate McKinnon's Tribute to Ellen DeGeneres

Best LGBTQ Media Moments of the Decade

Intense Interview: Cast of The L Word

GLAAD Media Report 2019-20: Where We Are on Television

Entertainment Weekly: LGBTQ Pride Forever Issue

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Evolution of TV's Queer Leading Men

Rachel Maddow: Smartest Lesbian on Television

 

Big Bang Theory's Jim Parsons Feels His Sexuality Has Never Hurt His Acting Career

In an interview with a UK-based gay lifestyle magazine, Jim Parsons opened up about his journey of discovering his sexuality and revealed how it has helped him in several stages of his life. During his interview with Attitude Magazine, Jim stated that he didn't expect the happiness and strength that he gained after coming out in 2012. He expressed saying that to date, the LGBTQ community is maligned by many while several public figures also pass some distasteful comments about them. However, he acquired a certain sense of happiness and strength after coming out, which he had never predicted.

 



The Primetime Emmy Award-winning actor feels that not only has his sexual orientation informed his work about the 'layers' he has to share as an artist but it also has had a great impact on his career. Jim added saying he doesn't feel being gay has negatively impacted or hurt his acting career. He rather feels that it has helped him evolve to be a better actor.

Furthermore, shedding some light on growing up around people where homosexuality was not celebrated, Jim Parsons said he realized that being brought up in a culture when homosexuality was reviled, it has had an impact on him. Elaborating more about the same, the actor-producer continued saying although he is happy to be who he is, he still hasn't grown out of the fear he developed in his early days. Jim also stated that he always thought he'll lose the people who were important to him, had he revealed his sexuality. He concluded saying despite things changing rapidly for the gay community in contemporary times, he still has that fear in him.

Jim Parsons played the lead role of Sheldon Cooper in TBBT cast. The American sitcom aired its first episode in September 2007 and its last episode in May 2019 with a total of 12 seasons. The show has aired a whopping 279 episodes spanning 12 years.

[Source: Kashyap Vora, RepublicWorld, Nov 2020]

 

About Big Bang Theory

IMDB: Big Bang Theory

Big Bang Theory: Sheldon Cooper

Biographical Notes: Jim Parsons

IMDB: Jim Parsons

 

Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Acceptance

Flexing the influence and reach of its multinational consumer company, and in consideration of the annual Pride Celebration each June, Procter and Gamble (P&G) has spoken up about the need to increase LGBTQ visibility in advertising and released a fresh spot that acts as a stark reminder that there is still considerable ground to be made.

In May 2020, it released the findings of its first-ever ‘LGBT+ Inclusion in Advertising and Media’ study alongside its strategic partner, GLAAD. Conducted online between November and December 2019, the study questioned 2031 non-LGBTQ US citizens across America, over the age of 18. It measured how non-LGBTQ Americans respond to LGBTQ representation in television, films, and ads.

"We decided to conduct this study with GLAAD because we wanted to better understand the impact of LGBTQ representation of advertising," shares Brent Miller, P&G associate director, global LGBTQ equality. "And the report a first step for us to get a deeper understanding of the dynamics within the marketplace. As we update our LGBTQ commitments, we want to define the best practices and standards for LGBTQ inclusion and bring other companies with us," he continues. "Up to this point, there has been fairly limited work done among the industry to make this happen."

 


The report found that non-LGBTQ consumers who are exposed to queer people in the media are more likely to be accepting and supportive of their issues. 80% of respondents of those exposed said they were supportive of equal rights for LGBTQ people when compared to the respondents who had not recently seen LGBTQ people in the media (70%).

It also claimed media exposure makes people more comfortable with LGBTQ people in their daily lives, with 72% of respondents claiming to be comfortable learning a family member was LGBTQ, compared to those who had not been exposed (66%).

The respondents also generally looked favorably at brands that use queer people in their advertising, with 80% of respondents finding it reflects that the company is making a statement about the importance of recognizing LGBTQ people.

“If you were to grade the advertising industry right now [in terms of accurate portrayal and visibility of the LGBTQ community] it would be an incomplete grade... class is not over yet,” insists P&G’s brand boss, Marc Pritchard. “The industry - including P&G - has a lot of work to do. It’s only been the last few years that we’ve begun to actively get going on this.”
 

[Source: Imogen Watson, May 2020]

 

LGBTQ Inclusive Entertainment Promotes Acceptance

Golden Globes: Kate McKinnon's Tribute to Ellen DeGeneres

LGBTQ Inclusion: Modern Family Deserves Praise

Best LGBTQ Media Moments of the Decade

Schitt's Creek Montage: David Saying Oh My God

Supergirl: Kara and Lena

Best Gay TV Couples of All Time

TV Shows with Gay Main Characters

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation

First Couple to Come Out on Australian Television

Pride: Why It's Important to Have LGBTQ Characters on Kid's TV Shows

Jamie Clayton: Transgender Actor and Activist

 

 

 

Dominique Provost-Chalkley: Her Journey to Coming Out

Hottest Way Haught Moments From Wyonna Earp

Backstage: LGBTQ Representation in TV, Film, and Theatre

Interview: Meredith Baxter (Family Ties)

Gay Moments in Frazier TV Series

Interview: Dan Levy (Schitt's Creek)

GLAAD Report: LGBTQ Inclusion On Television

Raising Hope: Maggie and Sydney

Wikipedia: List of Comedy TV Series with LGBTQ Characters

Schitt's Creek Montage: David Saying Oh My God

Video: Hottest Openly Gay Male Actors in Hollywood

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Visible: Out on Television

USA Today: LGBTQ TV Scenes 1971-1997

Interview: Neil Patrick Harris (How I Met Your Mother)

Video List: Highest Paid LGBTQ TV Stars in Hollywood

 

 

Matt Baume: LGBTQ Content on Television

 

The Golden Girls Meet a Lesbian Girl

Designing Women Goes Looking for a Lesbian

Archie Bunker, Drag Queens, All in the Family

Murphy Brown Goes to a Gay Bar

Kate & Ally and the Secret of the Lesbian Landladies

Roc and TV's First Gay Wedding

How Sitcoms Handled Homos in the 70s and 80s

A Salute to Sissies

 

Historic LGBTQ Television Moments

 

Arthur - In 2019, the popular PBS children's carton, Arthur, featured an episode in which the students learn that their third grade teacher, Mr. Ratburn is getting married. They soon discover that he is marrying another man.

 

Andi Mack - In 2017, in a first for Disney Channel, a key character on its popular tween series Andi Mack realizes he’s gay and comes out to his friends. The story will mark the channel’s first depiction of a coming-out journey.

 

Roseanne - In 2017, the reboot of the 1990’s sitcom Roseanne included a gender fluid character. Some of the new characters in the show include the children of Darlene (Sarah Gilbert) and David (Johnny Galecki). Their 9 year old child Mark is “gender creative.” The actor plays sensitive and effeminate and displays qualities of both young female and male traits. Roseanne originally aired on ABC television from 1988 to 1997 and was known for pushing the envelope on social issues.

 

 

 

Star Trek Discovery: Casting of First Trans and Non-Binary Characters

Queen Latifah and Living Single: Supported Marriage Equality Back in 1996

Advocate: Most Important LGBTQ TV Shows of the Decade

Transgender Child Actor Appears on Babysitters Club on Netflix

New Gay TV Couples for 2020

Jennifer Beals Receives GLSEN Respect Awards Champion Honor

Lilly Singh Featured in Advocate Mag's Women of the Year Issue

 

Good Luck Charlie - In 2014, Disney featured its first openly gay characters ever on the channel on an episode of Good Luck Charlie. Two lesbian moms, Susan and Cheryl, paid a visit to the Duncan family household. The moms were received with open arms by Charlie's parents, Bob and Amy.

 

Glee - Fox debuts the 2009 American musical comedy-drama, which focuses on a high school glee club. Over the course of the show, the glee club members deal with social issues, their relationships and sexuality. It has prominent LGBTQ content.  The show is a commercial success for Fox and wins several awards.

 

The L Word - Showtime debuts the 2004 television drama which focuses on a group of lesbian, bisexual and transgender friends in Los Angeles. The series airs for five years.

 

Ellen DeGeneres Show - The daytime talk show, begins airing on NBC in 2003. As of 2011, the show has won 32 Daytime Emmy Awards.

 

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy - Bravo debuts the reality television series in 2003. The show features a team of five gay men who perform makeovers on straight men. Each of the five guys has an area of expertise: fashion, style, personal grooming, interior design and culture. The show becomes a rating success and wins an Emmy for Outstanding Reality Program.

 

Buffy the Vampire Slayer - The popular TV series, launched in 2001, paves new ground by becoming the first show to develop a gradual, accurate, and full-blown lesbian relationship between two of the major characters, Willow, played by Alyson Hannigan, and Tara, played by Amber Benson.

 

 

LGBTQ People in Ads and Media: Makes Viewers More Accepting

Big List of TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

IMDB: Timeline of LGBTQ Couples in TV History

Arthur Kid's Cartoon: Mr. Ratburn Comes Out and Gets Married

Top Ten Groundbreaking Moments for LGBTQ TV Characters

Highest Paid LGBTQ TV Stars in Hollywood

Pride: Why It's Important to Have LGBTQ Characters on Kid's TV Shows

 

All My Children - Daytime soap All My Children breaks new ground in 2000 when the character Bianca Montgomery realizes she's a lesbian. Bianca, played by Eden Riegel, is the daughter of Erica Kane, arguably the most popular character in the history of American daytime soap operas. It is the first time that a major, continuing role has a homosexual orientation on daytime TV.

 

Queer as Folk - Begins airing on Showtime in 2000. Set in Pittsburgh, the series tells the story of five gay men. The show is a US version of the UK TV series.

 

Dawson’s Creek - The season 2000 finale of Dawson's Creek features the first passionate kiss between two men to ever take place during primetime. Jack McPhee (played by Kerr Smith) shares the onscreen kiss with boyfriend Ethan (played by Adam Kauffman) in this episode, titled "True Love." Earlier in the series, McPhee comes out after briefly dating Katie Holmes' character Joey.

 

Ally McBeal - In a much-watched episode in 1999, Ally McBeal (Calista Flockhart) and fellow lawyer and co-worker Ling Woo (Lucy Liu) engage in a 21-second-long kiss.

 

Will & Grace -  The NBC sitcom debuts in 1998. The series is built around four main characters, two gay men and two heterosexual women. The series goes on to air for 8 years, win 16 Emmys and become part of NBC's highly successful Thursday night "Must See TV" lineup.

 

 

List of TV Dramas with LGBTQ Characters

Jake Borelli Stars in Gay Rom-Com: The Thing About Harry

Fall 2019 TV Season: Shows for LGBTQ Viewers

Interview: Jim Parsons (Big Bang Theory)

Matt Bomer and Andrew Rannells Get Uncomfortably Close

List of TV Comedies with LGBTQ Characters

Golden Globes: Ellen DeGeneres Receives Achievement in Television Award

YouTube: Gay Themes TV Shows Worth Watching

 

Relativity - ABC airs a ground-breaking episode of Relativity in 1997, which features a scene in which a supporting character, out-lesbian Rhonda, played by Lisa Edelstein, shares a passionate kiss with another woman. This is the first open-mouth kiss between two women aired on prime time television.

 

Ellen - The coming-out episode of Ellen airs in 1997. In the episode, the main character, played by Ellen DeGeneres, comes out to her therapist, played by Oprah Winfrey. The episode, titled "The Puppy Episode", is one of the highest-rated of the series.

 

Friends - Carol is Ross's ex-wife, who realized that she was a lesbian. In 1996, Carol marries Susan, her partner, in network TV's first lesbian wedding.

 

Serving in Silence - The 1995 made-for-TV movie airs, featuring Glenn Close and Judy Davis. The film challenges the U.S. military's position on homosexuality. Close and Davis both win Emmy Awards for their roles.

 

Picket Fences – On the 1993 CBS TV show, two teenage girls kiss. The network demands that the scene be reshot in the dark.

 

LA Law - The first kiss between a homosexual couple airs in 1991 on network TV during an episode of LA Law. Abby Perkins, played by Michele Greene, and CJ Lamb, played by Amanda Donohoe, kiss after Abby gets a raise. Advertisers threaten to pull their ads over the scene.

 

Roc - A 1991 episode featured the first same-sex commitment ceremony on a TV show. Viewers were introduced to gay Uncle Russell, played by Richard Roundtree (Shaft).

 

 

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation

Huff Post: Gay TV Shows

Sarah Paulson Wins Emmy Award

Interview: Meredith Baxter (Family Ties)

Arthur Kid's Cartoon: Mr. Ratburn Comes Out and Gets Married

Interview: Neil Patrick Harris (How I Met Your Mother)

Timeline: LGBTQ in Pop Culture

 

My Two Loves - The 1986 made-for-TV movie airs. The film features Mariette Harley questioning her sexuality after her husband dies. She has an affair with Lynn Redgrave in the film.

 

An Early Frost – NBC airs a 1985 TV movie of the week, featuring Aidan Quinn as a Chicago attorney who goes home to tell his parents that he is gay and has AIDS. It is the first major film that deals with the subject of AIDS.

 

Soap - On the 1977 primetime TV series Soap, Billy Crystal plays Jodie Dallas, a gay man.

 

Hot l Baltimore - ABC debuts a short lived Norman Lear series in 1975, which features the first gay couple on TV. On the show, the characters George and Gordon are an older gay couple.

 

That Certain Summer - A 1972 made for TV movie, airs as the ABC Movie of the Week. It is the first TV movie to deal with the subject of homosexuality sympathetically. Martin Sheen and Hal Holbrook, big name stars at the time, play lovers.

 

The Corner Bar - The TV series that ran from 1972 to 1973 about the life and times of the patrons of New York tavern. It was the first American sitcom to feature a recurring gay character, Peter Panama portrayed by Vincent Schiavelli.

 

This Day Tonight (Australia) - In 1970, on an ABC current affairs program, Francesca Curtis and Phyllis Papps become the first couple to come out on Australian television.

 

Visible: Out on Television

IMDB: Gay Themed TV Shows

Seat Up: Queer Representation in the Media
History/Timeline: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People
Media Representation is Driving LGBTQ Representation

Advocate Interview: Dominique Provost-Chalkley

Tig Notaro and Sarah Paulson on Jimmy Fallon Show

YouTube: Best TV Lesbian Kisses

GLAAD Media Report 2019-20: Where We Are on Television

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

How The L Word Changed Lesbian Television

The Politician: Kiss Scene

Interview: Cast of Grace and Frankie

Hottest Way Haught Moments From Wyonna Earp

Lilly Singh: Let's Talk About LGBTQ Issues

Will & Grace Celebrate Pride Month

Interview: Dan Levy (Schitt's Creek)

First Couple to Come Out on Australian Television

LGBTQ Television Characters That Broke Barriers

 

 

 

Queer Representation in Media

Queer media doesn’t necessarily rely on queer people being the intended audience, nor does it require that queer people be affiliated with a cultural product in any way other than as consumers. Some very obvious examples of otherwise heterosexual mainstream media that have been embraced by subgroups within the queer community are television programs such as Xena: Warrior Princess or The Golden Girls; films such as The Wizard of Oz or The Rocky Horror Picture Show; and musical acts such as Hole (and lead singer Courtney Love), Dolly Parton, and more recently Lady Gaga. Many artists and cultural texts are adopted for their direct championing of queer rights such as Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter), Antonio Banderas (Shrek), or Kathy Griffin (Glee, Ugly Betty, Law & Order: SVU). Some individuals embody a struggle with adversity that strikes a chord with some members of the queer community (such as Courtney Love or Tammy Faye Messner). Other cultural texts are particularly popular within queer communities because of ambiguous sexuality such as Xena: Warrior Princess, Batman, or High School Musical (particularly the character of Ryan Evans). Sometimes characters (as is the case with Evans) are coded as queer (using verbal and visual markers to connote queerness without explicitly stating it. This includes elements such as body language, vocabulary, dress, vocal inflection, and various other aspects that are peripheral to sexual orientation), other times the subtext is unintentional.

 



In recent years there has been some improvement in the representation of queer people on mainstream network television. The popularity of shows such as Will & Grace and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy demonstrates that networks are willing to feature queer characters as long as the shows draw high ratings and generate profits for advertisers.

This profit-motivation means that networks are careful in their portrayals of queer characters. While Will & Grace (currently in syndication) features two openly gay male characters, there is little or no discussion about gay relationships or romance. The two gay characters are friends, not lovers, and they are rarely shown in romantic situations. The primary relationship for both gay men is with the heterosexual female characters.

Justin Suarez and Kurt Hummel from Ugly Betty and Glee respectively. Both characters are rather positive portrayals of gay teenagers who are solidly supported by their parents. They are both cast as oddities without being freaks and they are portrayed as having loving support networks. Suarez’s case is particularly interesting as he has an older gay role model throughout the series.

In fact, this seems to be an emerging genre: the gay/straight romance. Television shows such as Will & Grace and films such as My Best Friend’s Wedding, The Object of My Affection and The Next Best Thing all portray a gay man and straight woman as the “perfect couple.” While some critics have suggested that this trend represents an attempt to include gay and lesbian characters, others feel that such portrayals still marginalize and silence the experiences of gays and lesbians by denying them their own storylines and sexuality. This trend has not died out: in a 2011 episode of Glee entitled “Sexy”, two gay male characters perform a song and dance routine before an auditorium full of screaming and cheering girls, one of whom hands her phone number to one of the boys at the end. While the male character does reaffirm his homosexuality and declines the telephone number, it seems strange that gay boys in an all boys school still need to perform in front of straight women in order to legitimize the display of their sexual selves. Just as in earlier incarnations, queer sexuality remains filtered through a heterosexual gaze and is articulated in heterosexual terms.
 


 

Though mainstream television and movies continue to “sanitize” the portrayal of gay and lesbian life, specialty and pay-TV channels have begun to show more cutting-edge, controversial and critically acclaimed series about gays and lesbians. In 1999, for instance, Britain’s Channel 4 made history when it broadcast Queer as Folk, a miniseries focusing on the lives and loves of three gay men living in Manchester. The series was highly regarded not only by the gay community but also by the mainstream press.

[Source: Media Smarts, Canada's Centre for Digital and Media Literacy]

 

Backstage: LGBTQ Representation in TV, Film, and Theatre

GLAAD Character List: Where We Are On TV

Best Gay TV Couples of All Time

Pride: Why It's Important to Have LGBTQ Characters on Kid's TV Shows

NYTimes: TV Shows That Broke Ground with LGBTQ Characters

Petra and JR: Small Doses

Top Ten Groundbreaking Moments for LGBTQ TV Characters

Dominique Provost-Chalkley: Her Journey to Coming Out

Interview: Jim Parsons (Big Bang Theory)

Video List: Highest Paid LGBTQ TV Stars in Hollywood

Schitt's Creek Montage: David Saying Oh My God

 

 

Supergirl: Lesbian Superhero From Krypton

 

Supergirl (Launched in 2015) is an important groundbreaking television series in terms of LGBTQ representation. The Supergirl character, played by Melissa Benoist, is Zor-El who was sent to Earth from Krypton just like her cousin Kal-El (Superman). Her earthly altar-ego is Kara Danvers. The wonderfully surprising thing we eventually learn about her is that she is a lesbian.

 

The Supergirl TV series may be one of the strongest, most emotionally-complex shows on The CW television network. Particularly when it comes to female characters.
 

In season two, Kara's adopted sister, Alex Danvers, meets out gay detective Maggie Sawyer and starts the best coming out story line in TV history. The Alex/Maggie relationship starts the third episode of season two and continues until season three episode five when they break up.

In season four, we are introduced to another female superhero called Nia Nal (also known by her code name Dreamer), portrayed by Nicole Maines. Nia Nal is the first transgender superhero on television.

In season five, one of the series’ most important and largely unexpected relationships is between Kara and her best friend Lena Luthor, Sister of super villain Lex Luthor (played by Katie McGrath). As the two characters become closer, the Kara/Lena relationship fully explores the story of two women in love, and the first time in DC Comics history that Supergirl is portrayed as a lesbian.

 

Overview: Supergirl TV Series

Elle: Supergirl One of the Most LGBTQ Friendly Shows on TV

IMDB: Supergirl TV Series

Kara and Lena: Scenes From Supergirl

Supergirl Season 5: The Lena and Kara Relationship

Kara and Lena: More Scenes From Supergirl

Supergirl's 100th Episiode

Nicole Maines: First Transgender Superhero on Television

Supergirl: Kara and Lana Scenes

 

LGBTQ Episodes in Mainstream TV Series

 

Murphy Brown (1994) - The Anchorman

Murphy Brown (1992) - Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Designing Women (1990) - Suzanne Goes Looking for a Friend

Golden Girls (1986) - Isn't It Romantic

Kate & Allie (1984) - The Landladies

All in the Family (1977) - Cousin Liz

All in the Family (1975) - Archie the Hero

 

 

Featured LGBTQ Television Scenes and Montages

 

Ellen: Coming Out Scene

Dawson’s Creek: Jack and Ethan Kiss

LA Law: CJ and Abby Kiss

Love Victor: The Story of Victor and Benji

The L Word: Tina and Bette (1)

Orange is the New Black: Alex and Piper

Modern Family: Cam and Mitch Meet Lesbian Couple

Glee: Kurt’s Dad Confronts Finn

Million Little Things: Danny and Elliot

Dead To Me: Jen and Judy

Killing Eve: Vallanelle and Eve Kiss

The L Word/GenQ: Sophie and Finley

Dickinson: Emily and Sue

Friends: Lesbian Wedding

Melrose Place: Ella and Melissa Kiss

Andi Mack: TJ and Cyrus (1)

The Fortnight: Sleeping In

Flunk: Lesbian Romance

 

 

Glee: Santana and Brittany Scenes

South of Nowhere: Ashley and Spencer

Faking It: Karma and Amy Pool Kiss

Modern Family: Mitch and Cam’s Wedding

Finding Prince Charming: Kissing Paul

Transparent: Season 1-2 Recap

Pretty Little Liars: Emily and Alison
Being Erica: Cassidy and Erica Scenes

The L Word: Tina and Bette (2)

Glee: Brittany and Santana's Wedding (Abuela Shows Up)

Chasing Life: Brenna and Greer

Disney’s Good Luck Charlie: Susan and Cheryl

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Tara and Willow

The Fortnight: Sofa Conversation

Andi Mack: TJ and Cyrus (2)

All My Children: Bianca Comes Out to Erica

Glee: Santana and Brittany Montage

Dominique Provost-Chalkley: Her Journey to Coming Out

Same Same: Fluid Episode

Dead to Me: Jen and Judy

 

 

Characters Showcasing Positive LGBTQ Representation on Television

 

Schitt's Creek - David Rose

High Fidelity - Robyn "Rob" Brooks

Instinct - Dr. Dylan Reinhart

The 100 - Clarke Griffin

Inhuman Condition - Michelle Kessler

Modern Family - Mitchell Pritchett, Cameron Tucker

How to Get Away With Murder - Connor Walsh, Annalise Keating

Fear the Walking Dead - Victor Strand

Empire - Tiana Brown, Jamal Lyon

Sense 8 - Nomi Marks, Lito Rodriguez

Supergirl - Maggie Sawyer, Kara Danvers, Lena Luthor

Shannara Chronciles - Eretria

Grey's Anatomy - Arizona Robbins

Dead of Summer - Drew Reeves

Carmilla - S. LaFontaine, Laura Hollis

The Leslie - Leslie Clark

Black Sails - James Flint, Eleanor Guthrie

Orange is the New Black - Piper Chapman

Advocates - Iris, Adrian, Casey, Oscar

The Fosters - Lena and Stef Adams-Foster, Jude Adams-Foster, Aaron Baker

Carmilla - Carmilla Karnstein

Wynonna Earp - Waverly Earp, Nicole Haught

Transparent - Mort Pfeffermann

Orphan Black - Cosima Niehaus

Shadow Hunters - Malec

 

GLAAD Media Report 2019-20: Where We Are on Television

IMDB: Television Shows with LGBTQ Main Characters

Top Lesbian TV Couples

Critical Media Project: LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Best Gay TV Couples of All Time

Wikipedia: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People

IMDB: Timeline of LGBTQ Couples in TV History

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

List of TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

Special: Gay Disabled Comedy TV Series

Celebrities You Didn't Know Were Gay

Indie Wire: Best Queer Representation on Television

 

 

First Gay Kiss on Network Television

 

The first gay kiss on network television was on LA Law, between Amanda Donohoe and Michelle Green in 1991. After that, Roseanne Barr kissed Mariel Hemingway (Roseanne), Calista Flockhart kissed Lucy Liu (Ally McBeal), and Jennifer Aniston kissed Winona Ryder (Friends).

 

In 1994, on Melrose Place, Doug Savant kisses Ty Miller. In 1997, on Relativity, a lesbian couple caresses, nuzzles and goes for some passionate, open-mouthed kissing. On the Ellen show, after coming out in 1997, Ellen DeGeneres kisses Joely Fisher. In 1999, on Party of Five, Neve Campbell kisses Olivia D’Abo. In 2000, Dawson‘s Creek featured the first “passionate” kiss between two men on primetime television, involving Kerr Smith and Adam Kauffman.

 

On the Will & Grace show, gay kisses happened fairly regularly: Will & Scott, Will & Barry, Will & Vince, Jack & Jamie, Will & Malcolm, Will & James, and, of course, for fun one time, Will & Jack. 

 

Timeline: LGBTQ in Pop Culture

Dawson‘s Creek: First Passionate Gay Kiss on Television

Wikipedia: List of Dramatic TV Series with LGBTQ Characters

Huff Post: Queer Representation in the Media

 

 

Xena: Warrior Princess

 

True Friendship Knows No Boundaries

Xena Makes a Promise

Gabrielle Confesses Her Attraction for Xena

Xena and Gabrielle Might Be Lovers

Don't Leave Me Gabrielle

Gabrielle Says I Love You For First Time

 

 

LGBTQ Television Networks

 

Gay TV Television Network (2002)

Logo TV Cable Channel (2005)

Here TV Television Network (2002)

Out TV Cable Channel (2001)

 

Big List of TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

Top Ten Groundbreaking Moments for LGBTQ TV Characters

List of 1970s TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

GLAAD Report: LGBTQ Inclusion On Television

Wikipedia: List of Comedy TV Series with LGBTQ Characters

IMDB: Gay Themed TV Shows

List of 1980s TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

YouTube: Best TV Lesbian Kisses

Huff Post: Gay TV Shows

 

 

Advocate: Most Important LGBTQ TV Shows of the Decade

LGBTQ Television Characters That Broke Barriers

Best LGBTQ Media Moments of the Decade

List of 1990s TV Episodes with LGBTQ Themes

YouTube: Gay Themes TV Shows Worth Watching

Video List: Highest Paid LGBTQ TV Stars in Hollywood

Backstage: LGBTQ Representation in TV, Film, and Theatre

Indie Wire: Best Queer Representation on Television

Best Gay TV Couples of All Time

Timeline: LGBTQ in Pop Culture

 

GLAAD Media Report 2018-19

 

GLAAD is calling on the television industry to make sure that 20 percent of series regular characters on primetime scripted broadcast series are LGBTQ by 2025. Further, we would challenge all platforms (broadcast, cable, and streaming) that within the next two years, at least half of LGBTQ characters on each platform are also people of color. This is an important next step towards ensuring that our entertainment reflects the world in which it is created and the audience consuming it. Below are some of the most remarkable points GLAAD found in its research this year:

--Of the 879 regular characters expected to appear on broadcast scripted primetime programming this season, 90 (10.2%) were identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer. This is the highest percentage GLAAD has found in the fifteen years this report has counted all broadcast series regulars. There were an additional 30 recurring LGBTQ characters.
The number of regular LGBTQ characters counted on scripted primetime cable increased to 121, while recurring characters increased to 94, making for 215 characters.

 

 

 

--There were 109 LGBTQ regular characters counted in original scripted series on the streaming services Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix as well as 44 recurring characters, for a total of 153 LGBTQ characters.
 

--Bisexual characters make up 26 percent of the LGBTQ characters tracked across all platforms (broadcast, cable, streaming originals), a slight decrease in percentage from last year, but up to 128 characters from 117 in the previous report. The numbers still skew toward women, though there was an increase in bi men this year (90 women, 36 men, and two non-binary characters).
 

--This year, there are 38 regular and recurring transgender characters tracked across all three platforms, up from 26 last year. Of those, 21 are trans women, 12 are trans men, and five are non-binary characters.
 

--Racial diversity of LGBTQ characters increased on broadcast and cable, but decreased on streaming originals. For the second year in a row, LGBTQ characters of color outnumber white LGBTQ characters on broadcast television, 52 percent to 48 percent. 47 percent of all series regulars on broadcast scripted television are people of color, a three percent increase from the previous report and a record-high.

 


 

--Only one asexual character was counted in this report, Todd Chavez on Netflix's BoJack Horseman. No additional asexual characters have been added, and BoJack Horseman is set to air its final episodes in this reporting period.
 

--Broadcast hit another record high with 46 percent of series regular characters counted on broadcast scripted primetime television being women, a three point increase from the previous year. This still underrepresents that women are estimated to be 51 percent of the US population.
 

--The amount of regular primetime broadcast characters counted who have a disability has increased to 3.1 percent, which is a record-high percentage but that number still vastly underrepresents the actualities of Americans with disabilities. There are nine characters across all three platforms tracked (broadcast, cable, streaming) who are HIV-positive.
 

--Netflix counts the highest number of LGBTQ characters on all streaming services, and Showtime counts the highest number on cable networks. The CW boasts the highest percentage of LGBTQ series regular characters of the five broadcast networks.

 

GLAAD Media Reports: Where We Are on Television

GLAAD: Read the Full Report 2019-20: Where We Are on Television

GLAAD Report: LGBTQ Inclusion On Television

Wikipedia: List of Dramatic TV Series with LGBTQ Characters

Huff Post: Queer Representation in the Media

IMDB: Television Shows with LGBTQ Main Characters

Critical Media Project: LGBTQ Representation in the Media

LGBTQ Representation in the Media

Wikipedia: Media Portrayal of LGBTQ People

Indie Wire: Best Queer Representation on Television

 

 

GLAAD Media Report 2016-17

 

--Of the 895 regular characters expected to appear on primetime scripted broadcast programming in the coming year, 43 (4.8%) were identified as LGBTQ. There were an additional 28 recurring LGBTQ characters counted.

--There was an increase in the number of regular LGBTQ characters on cable, up to 92 from 84. However, LGBTQ recurring characters dropped year-over-year from 58 to 50. This is a total of 142 LGBTQ characters, regular and recurring.

--After GLAAD introduced its first count of LGBTQ characters on streaming services Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix last year, there is an increase in both regular and recurring LGBTQ characters expected this season. There will be 65 total LGBTQ characters on streaming services, up from 59.

--This year, there will be regular and recurring transgender characters on  all three platforms tracked (broadcast, cable, streaming). There are three trans characters counted on broadcast, six on cable, and seven on streaming original series. Of the 16, four are transgender men.

 

 

LGBTQ Broadcast Television

 

--Of 895 series regular characters counted on 118 primetime scripted shows on the broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, The CW, FOX, and NBC), 43 characters are LGBTQ. This is an increase from 35 reported last year.

--The overall percentage of LGBTQ regular characters on scripted broadcast series is 4.8%, an increase of eight-tenths of a percentage point from the previous year. This is the highest percentage of LGBTQ series regulars GLAAD has ever found.

--GLAAD counted an additional 28 recurring LGBTQ characters on scripted primetime broadcast programming.

--ABC posts the highest percentage of LGBTQ regular characters of all five broadcast networks with 7.3%

--FOX has the second highest percentage of LGBTQ regulars (6.4%), which is still above the percentage of LGBTQ regulars on broadcast as a whole.

--The CW is third with 4.3% of its series regulars counted as LGBTQ, and NBC follows at 3.9%. CBS comes in last at 2.2%.

--Gay men still make up the majority of 71 regular and recurring LGBTQ characters at 49% (35), an increase of two percentage points from last year.

--Lesbian representation decreased dramatically from the previous year, down to 17% (12) of regular and recurring LGBTQ characters. This is a drop of 16 percentage points from last year’s 33% (23 characters).

--Bisexual representation rose to 30%, up ten percentage points. That is 16 bisexual women and five bisexual men.

--There are three (4%) transgender characters expected on broadcast networks’ primetime scripted programming, two regular characters and one recurring character. Last year, there were no transgender regular or recurring characters on scripted broadcast programming.

 

 

Breakdown of LGBTQ characters in primetime programming on broadcast networks:

 

LESBIAN 17% (12 CHARACTERS)

GAY 49% (35 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL FEMALE 23% (16 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL MALE 7% (5 CHARACTERS)

TRANSGENDER 4% (3 CHARACTERS)

 

LGBTQ Cable Television

 

--The number of LGBTQ regular characters on scripted cable programs rose, with 92 this year from 84 the previous year. Recurring characters, however, decreased from 58 to 50. This brings the overall count to 142 regular and recurring LGBTQ characters expected, equal to the previous year’s total.

--Gay men still represent the majority of LGBTQ regular and recurring cable characters at 46% or 65 characters (up from 41% last year).

--Lesbians make up 20% (29) of the LGBTQ characters, which is a drop of two percentage points from the previous report.

--Bisexual women account for 25% (35) of LGBTQ characters on cable which is up two percentage points from last year, while bisexual men make up 7% (down from 13% in the previous report), or 10 characters.

--Six of the 142 characters (4%) are transgender, compared to just three characters last year. Among the 142 characters counted, ten are not expected to return due to series cancellations, format, or characters being written off but which appeared during the stated research period.

 

 

Breakdown of LGBTQ characters in primetime programming on cable networks:

 

LESBIAN 20% (29 CHARACTERS)

GAY 46% (65 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL FEMALE 25% (35 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL MALE 7% (10 CHARACTERS)

TRANSGENDER FEMALE 1% (2 CHARACTERS)

TRANSGENDER MALE 3% (4 CHARACTERS)

 

LGBTQ Streaming Television

 

--Last year, for the first time, GLAAD made a count of the regular and recurring LGBTQ characters in scripted series on the streaming content providers Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix. GLAAD included both original series created by these companies, as well as foreign series they have acquired for exclusive U.S. distribution.

--GLAAD found 45 regular LGBTQ characters, an increase of two from last year’s count. There were an additional 20 recurring LGBTQ characters, up from 16. This totals to 65 regular and recurring LGBTQ characters.

--Lesbians account for the majority of LGBTQ representation in streaming series at 43% (28 characters), up seven percentage points from last year. This is a far higher percentage than is found on either broadcast or cable.

--Gay men make up 23% (15) of those 65 characters, down from 39% in the previous year.

--Bisexual women make up 20% (13) of LGBTQ representations with bisexual men at 6% (four). This is up from 15% and 5% respectively last year.

--Streaming original series again boast the highest percentage of transgender characters of all programming platforms tracked at 11% (seven characters). This is a four percentage point increase from last year.

 

 

--This list includes four characters who have been killed off their respective series, but were included within our research period. All four were lesbian or bisexual female characters (Poussey Washington in Orange Is the New Black, Bea Smith in Wentworth, Cara Thomas in Marcella, Camila Barrios in East Los High).

--The Amazon original dark comedy One Mississippi, inspired by series creator Tig Notaro’s life, premiered this fall to rave reviews. Amazon’s critically acclaimed comedy Transparent returned for a third season in September. The series, which tells the story of Maura who is transitioning later in life, includes seven LGBTQ regular or recurring characters and three of those characters are transgender (with two played by trans actors). This makes it the most trans-inclusive series on all three platforms (broadcast, cable, streaming) tracked. It is also notable that of the three streaming services tracked, Amazon is the most inclusive of LGBTQ characters with disabilities, as four of 14 (29 percent) LGBTQ characters counted have a disability. Other LGBTQ-inclusive Amazon originals include Mozart in the Jungle, Bosch, and Red Oaks.

--Netflix is the most LGBTQ-inclusive of the three streaming services counted with nearly 40 LGBTQ regular and recurring characters expected in the 2016-17 season.

-- The flagship hit Orange Is the New Black is the most inclusive of all series with 11 LGBTQ characters, though the most recent season did include the tragic death of series regular Poussey Washington.

--Other LGBTQ-inclusive Netflix programming includes The Fall, DreamWorks’ Dragons, The Get Down, Grace and Frankie, House of Cards, Master of None, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and others. GLAAD is also keeping an eye on the previously announced series Dear White People, based on the film of the same name, which centers on Lionel, a student who is gay and black and is struggling to find a place to fit in at his university.

--Some of Hulu’s LGBTQ-inclusive series include Difficult People, Casual, Dimension 404, East Los High, and The Mindy Project, which the platform picked up after cancellation by FOX. The service has also announced a series adaptation of the novel The Handmaid’s Tale, in which Samira Wiley will play a lesbian character.

 

 

Breakdown of LGBTQ characters on streaming content providers:

 

LESBIAN 43% (28 CHARACTERS)

GAY 23% (15 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL FEMALE 20% (13 CHARACTERS)

BISEXUAL MALE 6% (4 CHARACTERS)

TRANSGENDER FEMALE 11% (7 CHARACTERS)

 

Other Media

 

Books/Publications

Magazines/Periodicals

Movies/Film

Music/Musicians/Songs

Arts/Entertainment

 

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