LGBTQ INFORMATION NETWORK │ RAINBOW OF RESOURCES

JEWISH|ISRAELI
 

LGBTQ Pride Celebration in Tel Aviv

Jewish Transgender Teacher Outed by Online Mob and Then Fired

Judge Rules Yeshiva University Must Recognize LGBTQ Club
Jason Brown's Emotional Free Skate to Schindler's List Score at Beijing Olympics
Video: Jason Brown's Free Skate at Beijing Olympics
Israel Lifts Restrictions on Same-Sex Surrogacy
Text Message Tells LGBTQ Israelis Repent or Die
Rivky: Closeted Hasidic Trans Woman

Undressing Israel: LGBTQ in the Promised Land

Tel Aviv: Recognizing Same Sex Civil Unions

Tahara: Film About Black Queer Jewish Teen

Adam Eli: Conversation with Gay Jewish Activist

Queer Midrash: Reimagining Hanukkah

 

 

Advocate: What Does Judaism Say About LGBTQ People?

LGBTQ Political Party Starting Up in Israel

David Comes Out to His Jewish Family on Shabbat

New Lesbian Deputy Mayor of Tel Aviv

Wikipedia: List of LGBTQ Jews

Oy Gevalt: About Liat Ben-Zur

PBS Video: Being Queer and Orthodox Jewish

Keshet: National LGBTQ Jewish Organization

YouTube: Gay and Jewish

Jewish Journal: Home for Gay and Lesbian Teens in Orthodoxy?

HRC: Reconstructionist Judaism and LGBTQ Issues

Ellen and Janis: A Love Story

Video: Black, Jewish, and Gay

Advocate Interview: Israel's Lifelong LGBTQ Activist

 

Jewish and Gay

 

“While there are no simple equations between Jewish and queer identities, Jewishness and queerness yet utilize and are bound up with one another in particularly resonant ways. This crossover also extends to the modern discourses of antisemitism and homophobia, with stereotypes of the Jew frequently underwriting pop cultural and scientific notions of the homosexual. And vice versa.”

- Daniel Boyarin, Daniel Itzkovitz, & Ann Pellegrini, Queer Theory & the Jewish Question

 

 

"The God I worship endorses loving, committed, monogamous relationships, regardless of the gender of those involved."

-Rabbi Marder
 

"Being gay is okay, so long as the behavior is not obsessive, responsible and safe, non-abusive, and the manifestation of a loving, respectful relationship."

-Rabbi Wilson

 

"First of all, I do not know what God thinks. In my opinion, homosexuality is not a sin, but an alternate lifestyle. In my opinion, homosexuality by itself is not immoral. When sex is used to corrupt, for prurient and/or exploitative purposes or selfish reasons or to hurt someone else, this is immoral."

-Rabbi Lazar

 

 

JQY: Jewish Queer Youth

Tahara: Film About Black Queer Jewish Teen

Jewish Transgender Teacher Outed by Online Mob and Then Fired

Jewish LGBTQ Organizations

Hebro: Entertainment for Gay Jews

Meet Gay Rabbi Aaron Weininger

What the Torah Teaches Us About Gender Fluidity and Transgender Justice
Conversation with Gay Jewish Activist Adam Eli

SNL Coffee Talk with Linda Richman

Embracing My Gender Identity and My Jewish Faith

BBC: Israeli Knesset Member Resigns Amid Gay Wedding Criticism

Advocate Mag: Comments From Anti-LGBTQ Rabbi

Lesbian Jewish-Palestinian Couple

Sojourn: Southern Jewish LGBTQ Resource Network

Photo Shoot: High Homodays From Hebro

Teaching My Girlfriend Yiddish

Wikipedia: LGBTQ Rights in Israel

New Lesbian Deputy Mayor of Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv Gay Beach

Ending School Homophobia is a Jewish Imperative

Undressing Israel: LGBTQ in the Promised Land

Queer Jewish Activists Putting Their Life on the Line

David Comes Out to His Jewish Family on Shabbat

Chef Michael Twitty: Unites His Black and Jewish Heritage With Food

Wider Bridge: LGBTQ Equality in Israel

Gay Jewish-Palestinian Married Couple

Israeli Knesset Member Forced Out for Attending Gay Wedding

 

What Does Judaism Say About LGBTQ People?

 

Within Judaism, there are many shades of LGBTQ acceptance and rejection.

 

Rabbi Denise Eger, the rabbi of the West Hollywood Reform synagogue Congregation Kol Ami, is one of the first openly gay or lesbian rabbis. She was ordained in 1988, and came out publicly the same year.  In 1990 Reform Judaism began ordaining openly gay and lesbian rabbis.

 

 

Eger says that Judaism has evolved on the issue of LGBTQ inclusion, particularly with the Reform movement’s long record of support for LGBTQ rights.

 

“There’s such a rapid change of pace,” says Eger, who became the first openly LGBTQ president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, which has endorsed marriage equality since 1996. She says liberal Jews want “to welcome all people and to speak out for human rights and LGBTQ rights.”

 

The primary branches of Judaism vary in their views on LGBTQ people:

 

Reform Judaism - Reform rabbis can officiate at ceremonies recognizing same-sex relationships, and most will perform same-sex weddings. The most liberal branch of Judaism, Reform is also the largest one in North America, Eger says. About 80 percent of Jewish people on the continent are either Reform or Conservative.

 

 

Conservative Judaism - Whereas Reform Judaism is broadly affirming, Conservative Judaism is “still in transition,” Eger says. Gay and lesbian rabbis can be ordained in Conservative Judaism, she says. Some Conservative rabbis will officiate at same-sex weddings, others will not.

 

Orthodox Judaism - Orthodox Judaism, the smallest branch of Judaism in North America, includes synagogues that reflect different degrees of acceptance. Most Orthodox rabbis oppose marriage quality and would not officiate at a same-sex wedding or affirm same-sex relationships, Eger says. In fact, some would reject LGBTQ members or even endorse discredited “reparative therapy.” However, some Orthodox synagogues would welcome LGBTQ people to be part of the community.

 

Theological Questions - From a theological standpoint, Jewish people face some of the same questions as Christians when it comes to scriptural interpretations. There’s the “man who lies with a man” verse in Leviticus. There’s a part of Noah’s story in which one of his son’s “saw his father’s nakedness,” which could be a euphemism for incest or molestation.  

 

 

For Eger’s part, she has criticized the “very literal fashion” in which religious texts are often viewed. “Bring your critical, insightful mind to whatever text you’re reading,” Eger said during a recent panel of pro-LGBTQ religious leaders. “Do not check your mind at the door.”

 

Nehirim is an LGBTQ Jewish organization. Like Eger, Nehirim officials note that things have changed markedly for LGBTQ people in Judaism. “Twenty-five years ago fewer than a dozen Jewish clergy publicly identified as LGBTQ. Today 200 rabbis, cantors, rabbinic pastors and clergy students in every denomination lead congregations, teach at universities, lead and teach at seminaries, run Jewish organizations, manage chaplaincy departments at hospitals and more,” Nehirim’s executive director, Rabbi Debra Kolodny, said. “We are thrilled that so many will clergy are willing to have meaningful dialogue about theology, leadership, and how we can help heal the wounds created by religion around sexuality in the Jewish world.”

 

[Source: Advocate, Stevie St. John, December 2014]

 

Jewish Views on Homosexuality

David Comes Out to His Jewish Family on Shabbat

Oy Gevalt: About Liat Ben-Zur

LGBTQ Affirming Jewish Groups

Photo Shoot: High Homodays From Hebro

Gamal Palmer: Black, Gay, Jewish

JTA: Israeli Government Opposes Adoption by Same Sex Couples

Lesbian Jewish-Palestinian Couple

Tahara: Film About Black Queer Jewish Teen

Conversation with Gay Jewish Activist Adam Eli

SNL Coffee Talk with Linda Richman

Undressing Israel: LGBTQ in the Promised Land

What the Torah Teaches Us About Gender Fluidity and Transgender Justice

HRC: Conservative Judaism and LGBTQ Issues

New Lesbian Deputy Mayor of Tel Aviv

Jewishable: Jewish LGBTQ Network

Advocate Interview: Israel's Lifelong LGBTQ Activist

Queer Jewish Activists Putting Their Life on the Line

Man Harassed for Wearing a Pink Kippah

Tel Aviv Gay Beach

Embracing My Gender Identity and My Jewish Faith

Welcoming Synagogues: Queering Jewish Religious Spaces

Times of Israel: Gay Pride in Tel Aviv


Jewish Transgender Teacher Outed by Online Mob and Then Fired

 

People dug up old pictures of her and shared them online. Then the death threats started.

In September 2022, at the start of the new school year in New York, a trans, Jewish teacher at Brooklyn’s Magen David Yeshivah was outed by parents and forced by the school from her job.

Talia Avrahami, who holds a master’s degree in Jewish education from Yeshiva University, was hired shortly before the school year began.

Following parents’ night at the Yeshiva, which serves a mostly Syrian Orthodox community, video of Avrahami introducing herself went viral on social media, with accusations that Avrahami was masquerading as a woman. People dug up pictures from before she transitioned and shared them on social media platforms.

 



Two Orthodox outlets, in posts since removed, disparaged Avrahami’s hire as shocking and “insane.” She was doxed, with her home address published online. The family was forced from their Washington Heights apartment for fear of reprisal. Video of Avrahami leaving her building with her husband and child with bags packed on Friday was posted to an Orthodox YouTube channel. That video was shot the same day Avrahami was forced to resign her position as a social studies teacher.

According to a spokesperson for Avrahami, the Yeshiva told her she wasn’t a good fit for the school. Avrahami agreed to take her salary through January in exchange for signing a non-disclosure agreement, barring her from disparaging the school publicly.

Over the weekend, the Yeshiva sent an email to parents addressing the vacancy: “Please be advised that your child will have a replacement teacher for Social Studies.”

“It’s sad to see that some people want to derail our lives,” Avrahami told The Times of Israel. “We’re questioning whether or not our entire lives are ruined or not. It’s tough.”

 



“They’re posting pictures of our family, they’re posting where we live, we’re getting death threats. They’ve somehow taken videos outside our home,” she said.

Despite the fact Avrahami signed a non-disclosure agreement with the school, she retains the right to make claims under civil rights employment law. The US Supreme Court ruled in 2020 that the protections of Title VII against discrimination applies to people who are LGBTQ.

[Source: Greg Owen, LGBTQ Nation, September 2022]


Jewish Transgender Teacher Outed by Online Mob and Then Fired
Trans Teacher Forced to Resign Following Transphobic Backlash

Jewish Day School Asks Teacher to Leave After She Was Outed as Trans
New York Yeshiva Asks Transgender Teacher to Leave Amid Uproar Over Her Identity
 

 

Tumtum: Talmudic Intersex

 

Tumtum (Hebrew: "hidden") is a term that appears in Jewish Rabbinic literature. It usually refers to a person whose sex is unknown because their genitalia are covered or "hidden" or otherwise unrecognizable. Although they are often grouped together, the tumtum has some halachic ramifications distinct from those of the androgynous, who has both male and female genitalia. Although tumtum does not appear in the Scripture, it does in other literature. Rabbi Elliot Kukla writes, "The tumtum appears 17 times in the Mishna; 23 times in the Tosefta; 119 times in the Babylonian Talmud; 22 times in the Jerusalem Talmud and hundreds of times in midrash, commentaries, and halacha."

In the Talmud, Rabbi Ammi says that the Biblical figures Abraham and Sarah were said to have been born tumtum and infertile, and then miraculously turned into a fertile husband and wife in their old age. Rabbi Ammi points to Isaiah 51:1–2, saying that the references to "the rock from where you were hewn, and to the hole of the pit from where you were dug" symbolize their genitals being uncovered and remade.

 

Queer Midrash: Reimagining Hanukkah

Supporting LGBTQ Equality During Hanukkah

Gay Jewish Hip Hop Artist Stands Up for LGBTQ Inclusion During Hanukkah

Eight Gay Jewish Women for Hanukkah

8 Ways LGBTQ Families Can Deepen the Meaning of Hanukkah

Tumtum: Talmudic Concept of Intersex

 

 

Adam Eli: Gay Jewish Activist

Adam Eli, the 28-year-old author and activist has been a trailblazing force in the international gay community for several years now. He's the co-founder of Voices 4, a New York-based direct action activist group that uses social media in a major way. The group's aim? "Global LGBTQ liberation." Voices 4's Instagram page functions as a digital meeting ground for anyone interested in lending their voice in a myriad of ways, from marches to meetings.

Eli also uses his own Instagram account (over 60K followers) to spread the word about upcoming rallies and marches and share important updates on queer world news. He also posts regularly about identity, body image, dating, and other LGBTQ-related topics. One day he might be sharing Grindr experiences on his Stories, and the next, it'll be about how he manages his anxiety before speaking in front of a crowd.

The Greenwich Village-based activist recently teamed up with Gucci to edit the fashion house's first zine, CHIME. The Chime for Change campaign features stories, videos, and artwork from a variety of voices in an aim to spread awareness and end gender inequality. Eli's partnership with the high-end brand is an important step for queer voices in the art and fashion world — it could open the doors for other notable brands to shine a similar light on LGBTQ issues.

 

In June 2020 he released his book, The New Queer Conscience.

 

Mashable: Meet Gay Activist Adam Eli

Advocate Mag: Time for Queer People to Live by a New Set of Rules

Penguin Random House: The New Queer Conscience (Pocket Change Collection)

Adam Eli Video: LGBTQ State of the Union

Conversation with Gay Jewish Activist Adam Eli

Huff Post: Queer Activists Putting Their Life on the Line

 

Holocaust: The LGBTQ Connection

January 27 is Yom HaShoah, or Holocaust Day of Remembrance. The focus is typically on the death of the 6 million Jews.  But, among the millions of people who were arrested, tortured, or killed during this tragedy were over 100,000 gay men. About half of these men were sentenced to prison or work camps, where they were forced to wear pink triangles. These badges signified that they had been sentenced under a harsher version of Paragraph 175 of the German Criminal Code, which was originally framed in 1871, and punished a broad range of "lewd and lascivious" behavior between men. Nazi leaders also claimed that gay men, by failing to procreate, were responsible for the downfall of the Aryan race.
Although Paragraph 175 omitted any mention of women and the majority of the persecution in Germany was on gay men, some lesbians also faced severe punishment.

 


 

Many are familiar with the pink triangle, but not everyone knows its history. "Before the pink triangle became a worldwide symbol of gay power and pride, it was intended as a badge of shame. In Nazi Germany, a downward-pointing pink triangle was sewn onto the shirts of gay men in concentration camps—to identify and further dehumanize them. It wasn’t until the 1970s that activists would reclaim the symbol as one of liberation.


Homosexuality was technically made illegal in Germany in 1871, but it was rarely enforced until the Nazi Party took power in 1933. As part of their mission to racially and culturally “purify” Germany, the Nazis arrested thousands of LGBTQ individuals, mostly gay men, whom they viewed as degenerate.


The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum estimates 100,000 gay men were arrested and between 5,000 and 15,000 were placed in concentration camps. Just as Jews were forced to identify themselves with yellow stars, gay men in concentration camps had to wear a large pink triangle."

 

 

After the end of World War II the persecution of gay men went widely unrecognized, in large part because cultural biases against them remained ingrained in the cultures of both Europe and the United States. The version of Paragraph 175 under which the Nazi regime had arrested and punished gay men remained on the books in West Germany until 1969. Indeed, even under the Allied Military Government of Germany, some gay men were forced to serve the entirety of the prison terms they had been sentenced to under the Nazi regime.

 

Holocaust Memorial: Gay Berlin and Modern Identity
How the Nazi Regime's Pink Triangle Symbol Was Repurposed for LGBTQ Pride
Remembering the Persecution of Gay Men and Lesbians on Yom HaShoah
Holocaust History: Reclaiming the Pink Triangle
Homosexuality and the Holocaust
Lessons Learned as a Gay Son of Holocaust Survivors
 

 

Jewbilee: Celebrating Gay Hanukkah

 

Christmas Eve Jewbilee is an annual event that brings together over 1,000 gay Jews from around the world to New York City for a wild celebration of Hanukkah. Started in 2007, Jewbilee is a party presented by Hebro, a social-startup for gay Jews living in New York City. The event brings together gay Jews and the gentiles who love them.

 

The sponsoring organization, Hebro, produces nightlife parties, cultural events and destination trips. Hebro attracts the cultural and modern urban gay Jew. Hebro began as a small gathering of friends on Christmas Eve 2007 and has turned into the largest gay party and event scene for Jews outside of Tel Aviv.

In addition to the Jewbilee, Hebro sponsors High Homodays, Homotashen, Sederlicious and Gay Pride parties in many of the premiere gay club venues in Manhattan. They also organize cocktail parties, happy hours and museum events. Hebro has also produced group destination trips to Berlin, Israel & Tel Aviv Pride and a destination weekend in Fort Lauderdale. Hebro events and trips have attracted gay Jews from all around the world and fully welcome gentile friends who love nice Jewish boys (sensibly termed "bagel chasers" or "goy boys").

Hebro was established in 2008 by Jayson Littman with the mission of creating a community of gay Jews to celebrate their unique culture and identity. And to husband-hunt.

 

Hebro: Entertainment for Gay Jews

Jewbiliee: NYC Celebration for Gay Jews and Bagel Chasers

Advocate: Pics From 2019 Jewbilee

Photo Shoot: High Homodays From Hebro

 

 

Israel May Ban Sexual Orientation Discrimination

 

Israel's Knesset advanced a bill in June 2018 banning sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination. The bill widens the scope of current anti-discrimination law.  Under the amendment, wherever Israeli law refers to discrimination, it would also mean discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. "In view of the changes that have occurred in Israeli law since 1992, and in view of the frequent attacks on the LGBTQ community owing to sexual orientation or gender identity in the form of discrimination and harassment, the time has come to amend the interpretation law beyond the legal meaning,” reads the explanation to the bill.

 

Times of Israel: Knesset Advances Bill Banning LGBTQ Discrimination

Y Net News: Knesset Approves Bill Banning LGBTQ Discrimination

JTA: Israeli Lawmakers Give Preliminary Approval of LGBTQ Anti-Discrimination Bill

Cleveland Jewish News: Bill Banning LGBTQ Discrimination Gets Knesset Approval

 

 

LGBTQ Rights in Israel

 

Same-sex marriage is not legal in Israel. The Israeli Government has registered same-sex marriages performed abroad for some purposes since 2006. However, marriages performed in Israel are only available from one of the 15 religious marriage courts recognized by the state, none of which permit same-sex marriage under their respective auspices. Consequently, Israelis who desire to have their same-sex marriage recognized by the Israeli Government must first marry outside Israel, in a jurisdiction where such marriages are legal, and then register upon returning home.

 

However, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) rights in Israel are the most advanced in the Middle East and one of the most advanced in Asia. Same-sex sexual activity was legalized in 1988, although the former law against sodomy had not been enforced since a court decision of 1963. Israel became the first in Asia to recognize unregistered cohabitation between same-sex couples, making it the first country in Asia to recognize any same-sex union. Although same-sex marriages are not performed in the country, Israel recognizes same-sex marriages performed elsewhere. Discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation was prohibited in 1992. Same-sex couples are allowed to jointly adopt after a court decision in 2008, while previously allowing stepchild adoptions and limited co-guardianship rights for non-biological parents. LGBTQ people are also allowed to serve openly in the military.

 

 

Tel Aviv has frequently been referred to by publishers as one of the most gay friendly cities in the world, famous for its annual Pride Parade and gay beach, earning it the nickname "the gay capital of the Middle East" by Out magazine. According to LGBTQ travelers, it was ranked as the best gay city in 2011, despite reports of some LGBTQ violence during the 2000s, which were criticized by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres. A monument dedicated to the gay victims of the Holocaust was erected in Tel Aviv in 2014.

 

World Congress of LGBTQ Jews

Gay Dating in the Middle East

Undressing Israel: LGBTQ in the Promised Land

Meet Gay Rabbi Aaron Weininger

YouTube: Lesbian Jewish Wedding Story

Queer Jewish Activists Putting Their Life on the Line

New Lesbian Deputy Mayor of Tel Aviv

Dana Goldberg: Jewish Lesbian Comedian

Tourist Israel: Gay Tel Aviv for Beginners

Tahara: Film About Black Queer Jewish Teen

Video: Black, Jewish, and Gay

Lesbian Jewish-Palestinian Couple

LGBTQ Political Party Starting Up in Israel

Tel Aviv Gay Beach

IGY: Israeli Gay Youth

Times of Israel: 79% of Israelis Back Gay Marriage

Wikipedia: Homosexuality and Judaism

Gamal Palmer: Black, Gay, Jewish

 

Rabbi Denise Eger

Denise Eger is an American Reform rabbi. In March 2015 she became president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the largest and oldest rabbinical organization in North America.  She is the first openly gay person to hold that position.

 

 

While studying to become a rabbi during the 1980s in New York City, Denise Eger started a group for gay and lesbian students, holding meetings far from campus. At the time, there were few prospects for out lesbian rabbis, a lesson Eger would learn personally. No one would hire her. But she found her calling at a synagogue created as a religious refuge for gays, Beth Chayim Chadashim in Los Angeles, the world’s first gay and lesbian synagogue to be recognized by Reform Judaism. It was a road that led her to found Kol Ami, a welcoming and jubilant Jewish community that is open to all.


Since then, the Reform Jewish movement (Eger’s lifelong spiritual home) has undergone a radical transformation on LGBTQ issues and now fully embraces the community.

 

Eger has been honored for her HIV/AIDS work and is a highly regarded expert on Judaism and LGBTQ civil rights. She is a noted author contributing to anthologies such as “Torah Queeries,” “Lesbian Rabbis,” “Twice Blessed,” and “Conflicting Visions: Contemporary Debates in Reform Judaism.” She wrote the piece “Creating Opportunities for the ‘Other’: The Ordination of Women as a Turning Point for LGBTQ Jews”, which appears in the book “The Sacred Calling: Four Decades of Women in the Rabbinate,” published in 2016.

 

Wikipedia: Denise Eger

Queery: Lesbian Rabbi Denise Eger

NY Times: Lesbian Rabbi Becomes President of Reform Group

Institute for Judaism and Sexual Orientation
What the Torah Teaches Us About Gender Fluidity and Transgender Justice
How Can You be Gay and Jewish?

Rabbi's View: Gay Marriage Does Not Violate Religious Rules

What Does Judaism Say About LGBTQ People?

 

 

Famous LGBTQ Jews

 

Harvey Milk - Politician

Barney Frank - Politician

Dana Goldberg - Comedian

Allan Bloom - Philosopher

Stephen Sondheim - Composer

Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosopher

Magnus Hirschfeld - Sexologist

Arlene Istar Lev - Social Worker, Therapist, Educator

Sandra Bernhard - Actor, Comedian

Joel Grey - Actor, Singer, Dancer

Harvey Feinstein - Actor, Playwright

 

   

 

Victor Garber - Actor

Annie Leibovitz - Photographer

Moises Kaufman - Playwright

Leonard Bernstein - Composer, Conductor

Jared Polis - Politician

Abbi Jacobson - Comedian, Actor, Writer, Producer
Jason Brown - Olympic Skater

Daniel Levy - Actor

Liat Ben Zur - Business Executive

Aaron Copland - Composer

Dave Koz - Jazz Saxophonist

 

 

Barry Manilow - Singer, Songwriter

Janis Ian - Singer, Songwriter

Adam Lambert - Singer

Allen Ginsberg - Poet

Tony Kushner - Playwright

Marcel Proust - Novelist

Gertrude Stein - Writer

Susan Sontag - Novelist

Maurice Sendak - Writer

Nomy Lamm - Musician, Filmmaker

Adam Eli - Author, Activist

Ari Shapiro - Radio Newscaster

Randy Rainbow - Singer, Satirist

 

 

Advocate: What Does Judaism Say About LGBTQ People?

LGBTQ Political Party Starting Up in Israel

David Comes Out to His Jewish Family on Shabbat

Undressing Israel: LGBTQ in the Promised Land

Man Harassed for Wearing a Pink Kippah

Queer Jewish Activists Putting Their Life on the Line

Advocate Interview: Israel's Lifelong LGBTQ Activist

Wikipedia: List of LGBTQ Jews

PBS Video: Being Queer and Orthodox Jewish

Photo Shoot: High Homodays From Hebro

Keshet: National LGBTQ Jewish Organization

YouTube: Gay and Jewish

Advocate Mag: Comments From Anti-LGBTQ Rabbi

Embracing My Gender Identity and My Jewish Faith

Jewish Journal: Home for Gay and Lesbian Teens in Orthodoxy?

Chef Michael Twitty: Unites His Black and Jewish Heritage With Food

HRC: Reconstructionist Judaism and LGBTQ Issues

Conversation with Gay Jewish Activist Adam Eli

What the Torah Teaches Us About Gender Fluidity and Transgender Justice
Ellen and Janis: A Love Story

Video: Black, Jewish, and Gay

SNL Coffee Talk with Linda Richman


HOME

 


QUEER CAFE │ LGBTQ Information Network │ Established 2017