LGBTQ INFORMATION NETWORK │ RAINBOW OF RESOURCES

WORLD
 

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

How the World Feels About LGBTQ People

LGBTQ Europeans: Over Half Are Not Out

Worst Year for LGBTQ Rights in Europe

Rising LGBTQ Bigotry in Europe Spurs EU to Action

 

 

Ukraine: Thousands March for LGBTQ Rights
Germany Two Transgender Women Win Seats in Parliament
Netherlands: 20 Year Anniversary of First Same-Sex Marriage

Bavaria: Duke François Comes Out as Gay at 87

Switzerland: Approves Same-Sex Marriage In Nationwide Referendum

Japan: Court Rules Same-Sex Marriage Ban is Unconstitutional

England: Veteran LGBTQ Humanist Activist George Broadhead Dies
Hungary: Proposes Ban on Material Promoting LGBTQ Activity Among Youth

Scottland: Politician Says Same-Sex Marriage is the Cause of COVID 19

Ghana: Politicians Move to Ban All LGBTQ Advocacy
Ireland: Incredible Transformation Into an LGBTQ Haven

Greece: Appoints First Out Gay Cabinet Minister

Germany: Making it Easier for Lesbian Couples to Co-Parent

Hungary: Ramps Up Assault on LGBTQ Community and Bans LGBTQ Rights

 

LGBTQ Rights in Europe
 

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer rights are widely diverse in Europe per country. 15 out of the 25 countries that have legalized same-sex marriage worldwide are situated in Europe. A further 13 European countries have legalized civil unions or other forms of recognition for same-sex couples.

 

 

The governments of Switzerland and the Czech Republic are considering legislation to introduce same-sex marriage. Slovenia has carried out a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage in December 2015 which failed to succeed. In July 2017, both Malta and Germany passed laws on same-sex marriage and went into effect a couple of months later. Same-sex marriage will be legal in Austria from 2019. Armenia and Estonia are the only two countries within Europe that recognizes legally performed same-sex marriages overseas, but do not perform them.

 

Constitutions of Armenia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine recognizes marriage only as a union of one man and one woman.

The top three European countries in terms of LGBTQ equality are Malta, Norway and the United Kingdom.

 

New Survey: Half of LGBTQ Europeans Still in the Closet

ILGA: Map of Sexual Orientation Laws Worldwide

Queer Europe: Entertainment Guide

World Wide Pride Celebrations

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

Survey: Most LGBTQ Europeans Fear Holding Partner's Hand in Public

LGBTQ Rights in Europe

Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival

Lesbian Couple First to Legally Wed in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland News: First Same Sex Marriages on Valentine's Day

The World's Happiest Countries Protect Their LGBTQ Citizens

Top Ten Best Worldwide LGBTQ Pride Festivals

Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

The Future Is Not In Front of Us, It's Inside of Us

Europe Becoming More Tolerant: Positive Side Effects

Outlawed: Anti-LGBTQ Laws Around the World

Gay Pride in Berlin

 

 

Famous LGBTQ People From France
 

Gerard Araud - France Ambassador to US
Sophie Arnould - Opera Singer

Olivier Ducastel - Film Director, Screenwriter
Christophe Beaugrand - Television Journalist
Marcel Carne - Film Maker
Christian Dior - Fashion designer
Celine Sciamma - Film Director, Screenwriter

Caroline Fourest - Writer, Filmmaker
Jean-Paul Gaultier - Fashion Designer
Guillaume Pepy - Government Official
Ines-Loan Rau - Trans Playboy Model

Jean-Pierre - TV/Radio Food Critic
Yves Saint Laurent - Fashion Designer
Thierry Schaffauser - Actor, Writer, Activist

 

Queen of England's Gay Cousin Got Married

Scotland Becomes First Country to Require LGBTQ Curriculum in Schools

Julianna and Valentina

Germany Bans Gay Conversion Therapy

Tblisi's First LGBTQ Pride Celebration

100 Year Old Polish Actor Comes Out as Gay

Gay Kings and Queens of Europe

Poland May Start Sending Teachers to Jail for Turning Kids Gay

Tutorial: French Kiss

Courts Advancing LGBTQ Rights Worldwide

Best French Lesbian Movies

Paris Hosts Gay Games

Mr. Gay Hungary

 

 

Passing the Fields: Gay French Film

Helpful Guide: French LGBTQ Vocabulary

Rainbow River at Norwich Pride in UK

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

Pride in London 2018

German Lawmakers Vote to Legalize Same Sex Marriage

First Transgender Woman to Compete in Miss Universe Pageant

Duas Noivas Lindas: Casamento Budista

LGBTQ Pride in Serbia

Je Suis Lesbienne

Top Ten Best Worldwide LGBTQ Pride Festivals

One Third of Poland Declared LGBTQ-Free Zone

Top Most Homophobic European Countries

Kim Petras: Interview With German Trans Girl

Gay Travel Paris France

 

 

World LGBTQ News
 

Ukraine: Thousands March for LGBTQ Rights

Germany Two Transgender Women Win Seats in Parliament

Netherlands: 20 Year Anniversary of First Same-Sex Marriage

Bavaria: Duke François Comes Out as Gay at 87

Switzerland: Approves Same-Sex Marriage In Nationwide Referendum

Japan: Court Rules Same-Sex Marriage Ban is Unconstitutional

England: Veteran LGBTQ Humanist Activist George Broadhead Dies
Hungary: Proposes Ban on Material Promoting LGBTQ Activity Among Youth

Scottland: Politician Says Same-Sex Marriage is the Cause of COVID 19

Ghana: Politicians Move to Ban All LGBTQ Advocacy
Ireland: Incredible Transformation Into an LGBTQ Haven

Greece: Appoints First Out Gay Cabinet Minister

Germany: Making it Easier for Lesbian Couples to Co-Parent

Hungary: Ramps Up Assault on LGBTQ Community and Bans LGBTQ Rights

 

How the World Feels About LGBTQ People
 

One of the major human rights stories of the past decade in the United States has been the astonishing progress toward equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people. The advance of marriage equality across the states before the Supreme Court made it the law of the land; the narratives of bullying and suicide that aroused public sympathy; and the swift rise in the visibility of transgender people have been tremendously gratifying and exciting to witness.

But while the United States can be awfully myopic, it’s impossible to ignore that this progress hasn’t been global. Sexual minorities in Uganda have been attacked with greater frequency since the country passed a law creating a new range of offenses related to sexual orientation, pairing them with correspondingly harsh penalties. Russia criminalized so-called “gay propaganda” as part of widespread government efforts to clamp down on free speech supposedly in defense of traditional Russian culture. And earlier this year, two gay rights activists were killed in Bangladesh.

In this context, it’s particularly interesting to read the results of a study released today by ILGA and Logo and conducted in conjunction with RIWI, a Canadian research company that has made a specialty of public opinion research in countries where it’s difficult to do traditional polling. The results from 96,331 respondents in 65 countries provide a broad — if not necessarily complete, because the surveys were conducted online — look at how the world feels about LGBTQ people. And it also suggests ways that gay rights movements around the world might advance in directions different from the one in the United States.

 

First, the broad picture: Thirty-five percent of respondents worldwide said that their attitudes about gay, lesbian, transgender and intersex people had become much more favorable or somewhat more favorable over the past five years. Fifteen percent said their feelings had become less favorable, and 50 percent reported no change. Sixty-seven percent agreed with the statement that “human rights should be applied to everyone, regardless of whom they feel attracted to or the gender they identify with.” Just 16 percent disagreed.

In no region of the world do a clear majority of respondents agree that “being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or intersex should be a crime,” though 42 percent of respondents in the Middle East and North Africa, and 43 percent of respondents in other African countries, said that being a sexual minority, transgender or intersex should be illegal. And 68 percent of respondents around the world said that they would be very or somewhat upset if their child said they were in love with someone of the same gender, though it’s hard to determine whether that response comes from opposition to homosexuality or concern for a child’s safety and acceptance.

Figures like these remind us of what we already know: that gay rights movements around the world are operating in vastly different cultural and political environments and have achieved varying levels of success and visibility. And it’s particularly interesting to look at the responses to the questions that ask respondents of other countries about subjects that provided powerful leverage for LGBTQ rights movements in the United States.

 



Take bullying of young people, an issue that provided rafts of sympathetic headlines, as well as plotlines on shows like “Glee.” Sixty-three percent of North American respondents to the survey said they agreed that “Bullying of young people who identify or are perceived as gay, lesbian, or transgender is a significant problem.” And while there was no region where a majority of respondents rejected the idea that bullying was a problem, there is less consensus on the issue in other regions than in the United States. Just 40 percent of respondents in Latin America and the Caribbean said that bullying was a significant issue, and 49 percent of Middle Eastern and North African respondents agreed.

Similarly, marriage equality became a successful battleground for gay rights activists in the United States because it provided an opportunity for the movement to argue that LGBTQ Americans wanted the same things as their straight peers, and the issue helped publicize the stories of long-term couples who were being treated differently from heterosexual husbands and wives. And now that LGBTQ couples can marry in the United States, and have been able to do so for more than a decade in Canada, 50 percent of North American respondents said that same-sex marriage should be legal; only in Europe is support higher, at 52 percent of respondents. Elsewhere, the numbers are much lower: 36 percent of Asian respondents supported marriage equality, as did 34 percent of Latin American respondents, 21 percent of Middle Eastern, North African and Central and Eastern European respondents, and 20 percent of African respondents.

It’s possible that the stories of committed same-sex couples might change those figures; as the report’s authors wrote, “These results seem to show that LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) visibility leads to more people actually knowing in person someone who is LGBTI and, hence to adopt a more positive attitude towards them.”

 



And the survey results suggest another area where many people around the world might be open to changes in laws that could make it safer for LGBTQ people to live out of the closet: employment discrimination. Fifty-six percent of respondents worldwide said an employer should not be able to fire workers because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Support for employment non-discrimination is weaker in some regions than others; 41 percent respondents from Middle Eastern and North African countries and 35 percent of respondents from other African countries agreed that companies should be allowed to fire LGBTQ employees simply on the grounds of their sexuality or gender expression. But despite pockets of support for employment discrimination, those responses suggest there may be global support for making it safer for LGBTQ people to be out on the job. The United States, of course, has yet to pass our own Employment Non-Discrimination Act.

But whatever courses activists in different countries choose, American advocates should be cautious about assuming that it’s possible to export a U.S. model for equality abroad. In fact, the idea that same-sex attraction is a Western, and potentially colonial, export infringing on other countries’ cultures pops up in a number of regions where respondents showed other discomforts about LGBTQ rights. Forty-seven percent of African respondents said that homosexuality was a “Western world phenomenon,” as did 42 percent of Asian respondents. And, as the report’s authors’ noted, 48 percent of Russian respondents agreed with that statement, too.

During the Obama administration, American embassies have had an explicit mandate to advocate for LGBTQ rights. And it’s understandable that gay rights activists in the United States want to see their brothers and sisters around the world win the same protections and public acceptance. But Logo and ILGA’s report is a reminder that movements around the world may have to find their own messages and paths forward.

[Source: Alyssa Rosenberg, Opinion, Washington Post]

 

Poland: Some Regions End LGBTQ-Free Zones
Brazil: President Bolsonaro Say We Have to Stop Being a Country of Fags

England: Maureen Duffy is Britain's First Out Woman in Public Life

Poland: Elects Harsh Anti-LGBTQ President

Poland: Pro-LGBTQ Protest at President's Inauguration

France: First Transgender Mayor Elected

Poland: Won't Let EU Force It Into Legalizing Same Sex Marriage

Netherlands: Plans to Remove Gender From ID Cards Entirely

Germany: Approves Ban on Conversion Therapy

Russia: New Survey Shows 1 in 5 Russians Want to Eliminate LGBTQ Community

Germany: Ban on Ex-Gay Therapy

Russia: Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

 

Current LGBTQ Situation in Europe
 

What is the current situation of the LGBTQ movement in Europe? The LGBTQ movement in Europe has been around for a long time and has grown immensely over the past decades. However, the environments in which the groups operate vary significantly, from Italy to Finland and the UK to Azerbaijan. The needs of the movement are always unique and need individually tailored responses.

 

Despite these differences, the movement overall has become increasingly professional. NGOs are run on the basis of democratic governance principles, reflect the movement’s diversity and meet high levels of legal and other accountability standards. This has allowed an increasing number of organizations to carry out their work with paid staff, although many NGOs continue to depend on volunteers for the biggest part of their work.

At the same time, many new groups have emerged and therefore are still in need of more basic capacity building. There are a rapidly increasing number of initiative groups working in cities outside of capitals. Groups representing minority groups within the LGBTQ community are also increasingly their engagement. Think for instance about religious groups or groups based on a certain ethnic background.

 


 

ILGA: Map of Sexual Orientation Laws Worldwide

Countries Where Gay Men are the Happiest

Gay Irish Prime Minister

Julianna and Valentina

Study Abroad: Most LGBTQ Friendly Countries

Vladimir Putin: No LGBTQ Families, No Same Sex Marriages in Russia

Best Countries for LGBTQ Visitors

Thousands March in Pride Parades Across Europe

Best Russian Lesbian Movies

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

Marriage Equality Worldwide

Famous LGBTQ People From United Kingdom

London Pride: Still Important

Une Femme Avec Une Femme

Best and Worst European Countries for LGBTQ Rights

Jadwiga: Female King of Poland

 

ILGA-Europe has invested heavily in building skills to allow other organizations to use a human rights based approach in their work. This approach combines the documentation of and reporting on human rights violations with advocacy work. Together with litigation work that advances the LGBTQ rights agenda through the court, this approach has proved tremendously helpful in advancing domestic and regional agendas through an evidence-based approach.

In recent years it has become increasingly important to combine the human rights based approach with efforts that focus on winning the hearts and minds of people over to support LGBTQ issues. The reason for this is simple: legislative debates on LGBTQ issues have become highly visible battles, leading to greater involvement of both supporters and opponents. This means that the capacity of the European movement needs to grow to effectively mobilize its own supporters, to win the backing of politicians, allies and citizens.

The need to raise awareness and campaign has grown rapidly in recent years, combined with an increased pressure on financial resources. Effectively supporting the European movement therefore includes questions around finding sustainable resources to make sure the movement can carry out their work.

 

[Source: IGLA Europe]

 


 

Rainbow Europe: Ranking of LGBTQ Friendly Countries

Gay Marriage Now Legal in Northern Ireland

Romanian Courts Rule LGBTQ Couples Should Have Legal Protection

Proud Dads Going to Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival with Their Gay Sons

GLAAD Report: LGBTQ Community in Europe

Liebesleben: German Music Video by Amy Wald

The Future Is Not In Front of Us, It's Inside of Us

100 Year Old Polish Actor Comes Out as Gay

Pride Celebration in Rio de Janeiro

Northern Ireland News: First Same Sex Marriages on Valentine's Day

One Third of Poland Declared LGBTQ-Free Zone

Czech Republic Could Be Next for Marriage Equality

 

 

Gay Kings and Queens of England

Europe Becoming More Tolerant: Positive Side Effects

What Do Polish People Think About Homosexuality?

How LGBTQ Friendly is London?

Luxembourg's Openly Gay Prime Minister and His Partner

Top Ten Best Worldwide LGBTQ Pride Festivals

Italian Lesbian Web Series

Lesbian TV Drama from Spain: Los Buenos Amigos

Best Italian Lesbian Movies

Helpful Guide: French LGBTQ Vocabulary

LGBTQ Royals of the World

Scotland Becomes First Country to Require LGBTQ Curriculum in Schools

First Gay Couple Married in Germany

 

Famous LGBTQ People From Italy
 

Gianna Amelio - Film Director
Giorgio Armani - Fashion Designer
Lorenzo Balducci - Actor
Pierre Cardin - Fashion Designer
Immanuel Castro - Singer, Songwriter
Nino Cesarini - Model
Claudio Cipelletti - Film Director
Milly D'Abbraccio - Actor, Porn Star
Domenico Dulce - Fashion Designer
Elenora Duse - Actor

Prospero Farinacci - Lawyer, Judge
Stefano Gabbana - Fashion Designer
Giancarlo Giametti - Businessman
Luca Guadagnino - Film Director
Andrea Occhipinti - Actor
Alfredo Ormando - Writer
Alfonso Signorini - Television Host
Bruno Tonioli - Dancer
Luca Trevisan - Computer Science Professor
Gianni Versace - Fashion Designer

 

 

World LGBTQ News
 

Poland: Some Regions End LGBTQ-Free Zones

Brazil: President Bolsonaro Say We Have to Stop Being a Country of Fags

England: Maureen Duffy is Britain's First Out Woman in Public Life

Poland: Elects Harsh Anti-LGBTQ President

Poland: Pro-LGBTQ Protest at President's Inauguration

France: First Transgender Mayor Elected

Poland: Won't Let EU Force It Into Legalizing Same Sex Marriage

Netherlands: Plans to Remove Gender From ID Cards Entirely

Germany: Approves Ban on Conversion Therapy

Russia: New Survey Shows 1 in 5 Russians Want to Eliminate LGBTQ Community

Germany: Ban on Ex-Gay Therapy

Russia: Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

 

Marriage Equality Worldwide

 

2001 Netherlands
2003 Belgium
2005 Spain
2005 Canada
2006 South Africa
2009 Sweden
2009 Norway
2010 Argentina
2010 Iceland
2010 Portugal

2012 Denmark
2013 Brazil
2013 France
2013 New Zealand

2013 Uruguay

2014 Scotland

2014 United Kingdom
2015 Ireland
2015 Luxembourg
2015 United States
2016 Greenland
2016 Colombia
2017 Finland
2017 Malta
2017 Germany
2017 Australia
2019 Austria
2019 Taiwan

2019 Ecuador

2020 North Ireland

2020 Costa Rica

2021 Switzerland

 

Marriage Equality Worldwide

Top Most Homophobic European Countries

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

Je Suis Lesbienne

London Pride: Still Important

Casamento na Praia: Brazilian Same Sex Wedding

Best and Worst European Countries for LGBTQ Rights

Sitges, Spain: Gay Capitol of Europe

Luxembourg's Openly Gay Prime Minister and His Partner

First Gay Couple Married in Germany

Gay Travel Barcelona Spain

Top Most LGBTQ Affirming European Countries

 

 

ILGA: Map of Sexual Orientation Laws Worldwide

Top Ten Best Worldwide LGBTQ Pride Festivals

Scene From Italian Film: Solitude of Prime Numbers

Gay Kings and Queens of England

International Gay & Lesbian Association of Europe

Colombia's First Woman and Lesbian Mayor Marries Girlfriend

Best German Lesbian Movies

Under the Skin: Short Spanish Language Trans Film

Jeremie: La Relation Entre Raph et Alexia

Gay Friendly Madrid Spain

O Amor De Aninha E Cacau

Video Advice: Should LGBTQ People Go to Homophobic Countries?

Best Russian Lesbian Movies

Rainbow Riots: LGBTQ Voices From Uganda

Short Portuguese Film: Para Ser Sua

Australian Parliament Approves Marriage Equality

Being Gay in Poland

 

Famous LGBTQ People From Spain
 

Pedro Almodovar - Film Director, Screenwriter
Gretel Ammann - Philosopher, Activist, Writer
Marta Balletbo-Coll - Actor, Director

Jose Villarrubia - Artist

Robert Fernandez Canuto - Film Director, Screenwriter

Nath Sakura - Photographer

Cristobal Balenciaga - Fashion Designer
Isabel Pantoja - Singer
Pio del Rio Hortega - Scientist
Juan Suarez Botas - Illustrator

Angela Ponce Camacho - Trans Model, Miss Spain

 

 

European Gay Slang Dictionaries
 

Spanish Gay Slang Dictionary
German Gay Slang Dictionary
French Gay Slang Dictionary
Italian Gay Slang Dictionary
Portuguese Gay Slang Dictionary
Greek Gay Slang Dictionary
Danish Gay Slang Dictionary
Dutch Gay Slang Dictionary
Swedish Gay Slang Dictionary
British Gay Slang Dictionary
 

 

Rainbow Europe Index
 

Which European countries have the best and worst LGBTQ rights?  Countries across Europe need to do more to protect the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people, according to a new index, which says law and policy advances have slowed down across the region.

The Rainbow Europe Index, released in May 2018 by advocacy group ILGA-Europe, ranks 49 countries in the region on their LGBTQ equality laws and policies, giving them a score between 0% (gross violations of human rights, discrimination) and 100% (respect for human rights, full equality).

Azerbaijan fared the worst in this year’s ranking, scoring less than 5% on criteria measuring policies in areas including equality and non-discrimination, legal gender recognition, hate crime and civil society space. ILGA-Europe cited police raids against LGBTQ people and offensive public statements by politicians among the major issues in the country.

Armenia, Turkey and Monaco were also among the poorest performers on the index.

 


In the European Union, Latvia was the lowest scoring country, with a mark of around 16%, followed by Poland (18%) and Lithuania (21%).

Meanwhile, Malta topped the board for LGBTQ rights, scoring more than 91% with positive steps over the past year, including the legalization of same-sex marriage in July. Belgium, Norway, the UK and Finland also received high scores for progressive LGBTQ laws and policies.

However, ILGA-Europe noted that only 16 of the 49 countries assessed scored above 50%, with several countries historically seen as “equality trailblazers” failing to make any major advances in the past year.


[Source: Alice Cuddy, Euro News]

 

New Survey: Half of LGBTQ Europeans Still in the Closet
Rainbow Europe: Ranking of LGBTQ Friendly Countries

World Wide Pride Celebrations

LGBTQ Rights in Europe

Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

Finland's Prime Minister Raised by Two Moms

LGBTQ Royals of the World

One Third of Poland Declared LGBTQ-Free Zone

Duas Noivas Lindas: Casamento Budista

Top Most LGBTQ Affirming European Countries

Germany to Recognize Third Gender

Thousands March in Pride Parades Across Europe

Top Ten Best Worldwide LGBTQ Pride Festivals

Helpful Guide: French LGBTQ Vocabulary

Being Gay in Poland

 

 

Marriage Equality Worldwide

Best Irish Lesbian Movies

Most Gay-Friendly Countries In Europe

ILGA: Map of Sexual Orientation Laws Worldwide

German Lesbian Video: Snogging

Kim Petras: Interview With German Trans Girl

Gay Irish Prime Minister

Lesbian German Soap Opera: Forbidden Love

Top Most Homophobic European Countries

Northern Ireland News: First Same Sex Marriages on Valentine's Day

Germany Bans Gay Conversion Therapy

Gay Kings and Queens of Europe

EU Observer: Gay Rights Under Threat

Best and Worst European Countries for LGBTQ Rights

Video Advice: Should LGBTQ People Go to Homophobic Countries?

 

LGBTQ Community in Nordic/Scandinavian Countries

 

Denmark was the first country in the world to recognize same-sex partnerships back in 1989, and the Scandinavian country officially legalized same-sex marriage in 2012. Gallup ranked Denmark among the “Top Places for Gay People to Live” in the world, and Copenhagen, its capital, was listed among the top cities for ex-pats.

Iceland, which legalized same-sex marriage back in 2010, was recently ranked as the happiest country for gay men. The Nordic island nation was also the first country in the world with an openly gay head of government, Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir, who served as prime minister from 2009-2013.

 


The Netherlands is considered the most gay-friendly country in the world, according to Gallup, and it was also the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in 2000. Amsterdam, its capital, is a popular destination for LGBTQ tourists and was ranked among the best cities in the world for expats.

Norway legalized same-sex marriage in 2009, became the first country to enact anti-discrimination protections based on sexual orientation in 1981 and is ranked no. 6 on HSBC's best countries for expats. LGBTQ culture is also very visible in the Scandinavian country -- Pride in Oslo is one of Norway's largest events, and the city is also home to one of the world's best gay choirs.

 



Sweden comes in at no. 8 on both Gallup's list of "Top Places for Gay People to Live" and HSBC's list of best countries for expats. Same-sex marriage has been legal in the Scandinavian country since 2009, and anti-LGBTQ discrimination has been banned since the 80s.

 

Are the Dutch LGBTQ Friendly?

LGBTQ Rights in Norway

Nordic Countries Lead World in LGBTQ Equality

LGBTQ Rights in Iceland

Being Gay in Amsterdam

Gay Friendly Sweden

LGBTQ Rights in Finland

Stockholm is a Great Lesbian Destination

LGBTQ Rights in Sweden

What is the LGBTQ Culture Like in the Netherlands?

LGBTQ Youth in Finland

Celebrating LGBTQ Pride in Iceland

LGBTQ Rights in the Netherlands

Gay Visitors to Iceland

Biggest Pride Parade in Scandinavia

LGBTQ Rights in Denmark

Gay Culture in Sweden

 

 

Famous LGBTQ People From Germany
 

Kim Petras - Pop Music Singer, Songwriter, World's youngest transsexual

Susanne Baer - Legal Scholar
Erica Brausen - Art Dealer
Manfred Bruns - Civil Rights Activist
Wolfgang Busch - Filmmaker
Dirk Dirksen - Music Promoter
Prince Egon von Furstenberg - Banker, Aristocrat
Wilhelm von Gloeden - Photographer
Alfred Hirsch - Athlete, Teacher, Zionist Activist
Ilse Kokula - Educator, Author, Activist

 

 

Dora Richter - First known person to undergo gender reassignment surgery

Rudolph Moshammer - Fashion Designer
Michael Mronz - Sports/Events Manager
Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau - Film Director
Ulrike Ottinger - Photographer, Filmmaker
Eva Rieger - Musicologist
Alice Schwarzer - Journalist
Wieland Speck - Film Director
Jorn Weisbrodt - Art Administrator
Felice Schragenheim - World War II Jewish Resistance Fighter
Lilly Wust - World War II Soldier, Activist

 

World LGBTQ News
 

Ukraine: Thousands March for LGBTQ Rights

Germany Two Transgender Women Win Seats in Parliament

Netherlands: 20 Year Anniversary of First Same-Sex Marriage

Bavaria: Duke François Comes Out as Gay at 87

Switzerland: Approves Same-Sex Marriage In Nationwide Referendum

Japan: Court Rules Same-Sex Marriage Ban is Unconstitutional

England: Veteran LGBTQ Humanist Activist George Broadhead Dies
Hungary: Proposes Ban on Material Promoting LGBTQ Activity Among Youth

Scottland: Politician Says Same-Sex Marriage is the Cause of COVID 19

Ghana: Politicians Move to Ban All LGBTQ Advocacy
Ireland: Incredible Transformation Into an LGBTQ Haven

Greece: Appoints First Out Gay Cabinet Minister

Germany: Making it Easier for Lesbian Couples to Co-Parent

Hungary: Ramps Up Assault on LGBTQ Community and Bans LGBTQ Rights

 

 

LGBTQ Community in Eastern Europe
 

I have been tracking and reporting on anti-gay tendencies occurring across Europe with a growing frequency. One week I am reporting on a referendum in Slovakia, where conservative groups, backed by the Catholic Church, attempt to put further restrictions on marriage equality. The next week there are massive protests in Slovenia, where the marriage equality law was just past, with thousands threatening to launch contra-referendum to overrule the new legislation. Growing up in the Czech Republic, a post-communist country in the heart of Europe, I have never experienced open hostility towards the LGBTQ community. During the Communist time, the state was too busy with political repression to concern itself with policing sexual orientation. While today, public awareness, media attention, and legal improvements are a showing a steady increase. This has often to do more with curiosity than actual sympathy. However, the LGBTQ community in the Czech Republic has progressed far better than many of its western counterparts. Sometimes, we believe that the way we grow up and the experiences we have encountered must be the standard for everybody else. I thought of Eastern Europe as very liberal and forthcoming in regards to the LGBTQ rights. I could not have been more wrong. More than 16 countries in Europe and Eurasia introduced anti-gay laws, or restricted marriage to solely between woman and man in the past five years, making my experiences from the Czech Republic the exception.

 

[Source: Michael Krejcova, GLAAD]

 

Thousands March in Ukraine for LGBTQ Rights

Czech Republic Could Be Next for Marriage Equality
LGBTQ Rights in Russia

Tblisi's First LGBTQ Pride Celebration

What Do Ukranians Think About LGBTQ Issues?

ABC News: What It's Like to Be Gay in Chechnya

Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

Washington Post: Gay Rights in Eastern Europe

The Guardian: LGBTQ Rights in Russia

UNDP: Being LGBTQ in Eastern Europe

Vladimir Putin: No LGBTQ Families, No Same Sex Marriages in Russia

LGBTQ Russian Couple: Myths About Lesbians

Struggle of Being Gay in Albania

LGBTQ Rights Around the World Are in Danger

New Yorker: Russian LGBTQ Persecution Defies Belief

Facts on LGBTQ Rights in Russia

Homonegativity in Eastern Europe

Young Adults in Central and Eastern Europe Oppose LGBTQ Rights

Best Russian Lesbian Movies

Nasha Vesna: Russian Lesbians

New Survey Shows 1 in 5 Russians Want to Eliminate LGBTQ Community

Queer Tango in Russia

 

 

LGBTQ Situation in Russia
 

It has been well-documented that discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer persons (including by the government and its agents) is widespread and severe in Russia. LGBTQ persons in Russia experience discrimination in many different aspects of their life, ranging from housing to healthcare and from their relationships and to their employment. Discrimination occurs when LGBTQ persons are treated unfavourably due to their sexual orientation or their gender identity and where they are treated the same as others, but experience an adverse impact due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Discrimination can take many different forms, from not being offered a promotion at work to being evicted or from harassment at school to (most troubling of all) physical assault resulting in serious injury or death.

Both domestic and international human rights organisations report high levels of discrimination and violence against LGBTQ persons in Russia. In 2015, the Russian LGBTQ Network surveyed 1,346 LGBTQ persons regarding their experience of discrimination and violence over a period of 12 months. The survey found that 17% of respondents had experienced physical violence, and 32% had experienced discrimination in the workplace and workplace harassment. Nine percent of respondents had faced restricted access to goods and services, and eight percent had experienced restricted access to health care.

[Source: Equal Rights Trust]

 

 

Famous LGBTQ People From United Kingdom
 

Freddie Mercury - Singer, Songwriter (Queen)
Ian McKellen - Actor
George Michael - Singer, Songwriter
Stephen Fry - Comedian, Actor, Activist
John Albert Bullbrook - Archeologist
Boy George - Singer, Songwriter
Peter Shaffer - Playwright (Equus, Amadeus, Black Comedy)
Christopher Bailey - Businessman
Katherine Gillespie Sells - Activist
Alan Turing - Mathematician, Computer Scientist
Graham Chapman - Comedian, Writer, Actor (Monty Python)
Marc Almond - Singer, Songwriter
Rupert Everett - Actor
Horace Walpole - Politician
Oscar Wilde - Poet
David Burgess - Lawyer
Sue Perkins - Comedian, Actor, Writer

Oliver Sacks - Neurologist, Medical Doctor, Writer (Awakenings)
 

 

George Broadhead - Activist (LGBTQ Humanist Movement)

Philip Bourchier O'Ferrall - Media Executive
John Schlesinger - Film Director
Francis Bacon - Philosopher, Scientist, Author
Patrick Trevor-Roper - Eye Surgeon
Dusty Springfield - Pop Singer
Charles Laughton - Stage/Film Actor, Director
John Maynard Keynes - Economist
Sue Sanders - Activist

Lord Byron - Poet
Phyllida LLoyd - Film Director
Maggie Hambling - Painter, Sculptor
John Gielgud - Actor
Stephanie Hirst - Radio/TV Host
Michael Cashman - Politician

 


Derek Pattinson - Secretary General of General Synod of Church of England
Paul Dehn - Screenwriter
Christine Goodwin - Trans Rights Activist
James Fenton - Poet

Simon LeVay - Scientist
Lynda Cash - First Transsexual in Royal Navy
Rob Halford - Singer, Songwriter (Judas Priest)
Matthew Bourne - Choreographer
Noel Coward - Playwright, Composer, Director, Actor
Antony Grey - Activist
Clive Baker - Writer, Film Director, Artist
Neil Tennant - Singer, Songwriter (Pet Shop Boys)
Munroe Bergdorf - Model, Activist
Simon Amstell - Comedian
CD Broad - Philosopher, Historian, Scientist
Ossie Clark - Fashion Designer
Mark Ashton - Activist
Holly Johnson - Musician (Frankie Goes to Hollywood)
Quentin Crisp - Writer
 

 

WH Auden - Poet
AE Housman - Scholar, Poet
Basil Hoskins - Actor
John Curry - Olympic Skater
Matthew Rush - Soccer Player
David Hockney - Painter, Photographer

Jasper Conran - Fashion Designer
Algernon Charles Swinburne - Poet, Playwright, Novelist
Carol Ann Stone - Transsexual Anglican Priest
Paul Patrick - Educator, Activist
Keith Milow - Artist
Lionel Blue - Rabbi
John Inman - Sitcom Actor
Kate Craig-Wood - Transsexual IT Entrepreneur
Alexander McQueen - Fashion Designer
Antony Tudor - Dancer
Peter Tatchell - Politician, Activist

Robert Rinder - Judge
Nigel Hawthorne - Actor
Justin Fashanu - Soccer Player
EM Forster - Novelist

Peter Landon - Computer Scientist
Judy Carne - Actor (Laugh In)

 

Poland: Some Regions End LGBTQ-Free Zones

Brazil: President Bolsonaro Say We Have to Stop Being a Country of Fags

England: Maureen Duffy is Britain's First Out Woman in Public Life

Poland: Elects Harsh Anti-LGBTQ President

Poland: Pro-LGBTQ Protest at President's Inauguration

France: First Transgender Mayor Elected

Poland: Won't Let EU Force It Into Legalizing Same Sex Marriage

Netherlands: Plans to Remove Gender From ID Cards Entirely

Germany: Approves Ban on Conversion Therapy

Russia: New Survey Shows 1 in 5 Russians Want to Eliminate LGBTQ Community

Germany: Ban on Ex-Gay Therapy

Russia: Putin Vows to Never Allow Same-Sex Marriage in Russia

 

Diversity in the LGBTQ Community

African American/Black
Hispanic/Latinx

Arab/Muslim/Middle East

Asian/Pacific

Indian/Hindu/Sikh

Jewish/Israeli

Native/Two Spirit

 

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