LGBTQ INFORMATION NETWORK │ RAINBOW OF RESOURCES

TRANSGENDER

 

Transgender Lifeline

Tommy Dorfman Comes Out as Trans

Trans Children Across US Are Fighting For Their Lives (Again)
Transgender Woman Captures Miss Nevada USA Pageant
President Biden Issues First Presidential Proclamation of Transgender Visibility Day

Gender Affirming Surgery Linked to Better Mental Health

Attack After Attack: Trans Youth Speak Out on Health and Sports Bills Aimed at Them
Meet Rebekah: 14-Year-Old Trans Girl Who Just Wants to Play Sports

Transgender Day of Visibility: Celebrating Our Existence and Fighting for Our Rights

Arkansas Lawmakers Enact Trans Youth Treatment Ban

Trans Youth Rights: Not About Bathrooms or Women's Sports

Dr. Rachel Levine Confirmed for Assistant Health Secretary

Leyna Bloom: Makes History on Cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition

Time Magazine: Elliot Page Is Ready for This Moment

Police Officer Defends Trans Daughter Against Anti-Trans Legislation

Biden Reverses Trump's Transgender Military Ban

New Poll: 73 Percent of People Support Trans Kids in Sports

 

 

Tommy Dorfman Reintroduces Herself as a Trans Woman

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

Southeast US: Dangerous for Trans People

Father of Trans Daughter Testifies Against Trans Youth Athlete Ban

Anti-Trans Violence Continues to Surge

Trans Kids: Target of Conservatives' New Culture War

Record Number of Anti-Trans Bills Introduced in States This Year
Comic Eddie Izzard Now Uses She/Her Pronouns

Jody Davis: Veteran, Nurse, Transgender

B. Scott on BET: First Trans Non-Binary Host and Producer

Elliot Page, Star of Umbrella Academy and Juno, Comes Out as Trans

Comic Eddie Izzard in Girl Mode From Now On

Trans People Who Lost Their Lives to Violence in 2020

President Biden Overturns Ban on Transgender Military Personnel

Sculpture Unveiled in NYC Honoring Trans and Nonbinary Communities

How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

 

Transgender Definition

Transgender people are people who have a gender identity or gender expression that differs from their assigned sex. Transgender people are sometimes called transsexual if they desire medical assistance to transition from one sex to another. The term "transgender" can also be used an umbrella term to refer to people whose gender identity is the opposite of their assigned sex (trans men and trans women). It may include people who are not exclusively masculine or feminine (people who are genderqueer, bigender, pangender, genderfluid, agender). Other definitions of "transgender" also include people who belong to a third gender, or conceptualize transgender people as a third gender.

 

The transgender designation is oftentimes expressed as the abbreviation "trans." You might also see the term written with an asterisk(*), as in: trans*. Adding the asterisk indicates a broader, more expansive, more inclusive meaning beyond the basic definition of transgender.

Being transgender is independent of sexual orientation. Transgender people may identify as heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, or may consider conventional sexual orientation labels inadequate or inapplicable. The term transgender can also be distinguished from intersex, a term that describes people born with physical sex characteristics that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies.

The degree to which individuals feel genuine, authentic, and comfortable within their external appearance and accept their genuine identity has been called transgender congruence. Many transgender people experience gender dysphoria, and some seek medical treatments such as hormone replacement therapy, sex reassignment surgery, or psychotherapy. Not all transgender people desire these treatments, and some cannot undergo them for financial or medical reasons.

Most transgender people face discrimination at and in accessing work, public accommodations, and healthcare. They are not legally protected from discrimination in many places.

 

 

Glee Video: If I Were a Boy

Elliot Page: I Knew I Was a Boy Since I Was 9 Years Old

Jeopardy Game Show Contestant: First Out Transgender Winner

Killing of Transgender Americans at All Time High

Court Delivers Two Victories for Trans Americans

Frequently Asked Questions: Transgender Children

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

Info: Sexual Identity

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Transformation: Male to Female

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

PBS Video: Asian Trans Person Talks About Gender Dysphoria

Trans Boy: I Started Living My Life Instead of Just Surviving

Me As A Girl: Transition Timeline

Video: Young, Trans, and Looking for Love

Ten Myths About Transgender Love

Dwayne Wade's Trans Daughter Makes Red Carpet Debut

Happily Trans: Short Documentary

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Flavia Music Video: Them

 

 

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

Trans Children Across US Are Fighting For Their Lives (Again)

Valentina Sampaio: Interview With Trans Fashion Model

Eye Opening Facts About Being Transgender

Video Story: My Friend is Transgender

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Young Trans Activists to Know

Why We Need Trans People in the US Military

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker|

Stories of Incredible Trans Youth

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Music Video: I Am Samantha

50 Years Ago: My Sister Became My Brother

Chazzie: Story of a Transgender Girl and Her Parents

New Study: Transgender Youth and Suicide Risk

Transgender People Killed in 2019

Happily Trans: Short Documentary

Trans Sistas of Color Project

 

Nevada Pageant Winner Becomes First Transgender Miss USA Contestant

Kataluna Enriquez, who was crowned Miss Nevada USA in June 2021, will become the first openly transgender woman to compete in the Miss USA pageant. With a platform centered on transgender awareness and mental health, Enriquez, 27, beat out 21 other contestants at the South Point Hotel Casino in Las Vegas. “I didn’t have the easiest journey in life,” she said. “I struggled with physical and sexual abuse. I struggled with mental health. I didn’t have much growing up. I didn’t have support. But I’m still able to thrive, and I’m still able to survive and become a trailblazer for many.” After her win, Enriquez thanked the LGBTQ community, writing, “My win is our win. We just made history. Happy Pride.”

In March 2021, Enriquez, who previously competed in trans-specific pageants, became the first transgender woman crowned Miss Silver State USA, the main preliminary for Miss Nevada USA. During the pageant’s question-and-answer segment, Enriquez said being true to herself was an obstacle she faced daily. “Today I am a proud transgender woman of color. Personally, I’ve learned that my differences do not make me less than, it makes me more than,” she said. “I know that my uniqueness will take me to all my destinations, and whatever I need to go through in life.”

 



Enriquez, who is Filipina American, designs her own outfits, including a rainbow-sequin gown she wore Sunday night in honor of Pride Month “and all of those who don’t get a chance to spread their colors,” she explained.  "Pageantry is so expensive, and I wanted to compete and be able to grow and develop skills and create gowns for myself and other people," Enriquez said.

She will represent Nevada at the 2021 Miss USA pageant, being held November 2021 at the Paradise Cove Theater at the River Spirit Casino Resort in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The Miss Universe pageant system, of which Los Angeles-based Miss USA is part, began allowing transgender entrants in 2012. If she is crowned Miss USA, Enriquez will be the second trans contestant in a Miss Universe pageant, after Spain’s Angela Ponce in 2018.

 

Miss America, a separate organization headquartered in New Jersey, did not immediately reply to an inquiry about whether transgender women or nonbinary individuals are allowed to compete in its annual competition. As of 2018, the pageant was reportedly only open to “natural born women,” according to the Advocate.

In February, a federal judge upheld the right of another organization, Nevada-based Miss United States of America, to bar transgender contestants from its pageant.

[Source: Dan Avery, NBC News, June 2021]

 

Advocate: First Trans Contestant to Compete in Miss USA

NBC News: Nevada Pageant Winner Becomes First Tansgender Miss USA Contestant

Washington Post: Kataluna Enriquez Dreamed of Seeing a Transgender Miss USA Contestant
Miss Nevada USA Winner Makes History: 1st Trans Woman to Hold the Title
2021 Miss Nevada Winner is First Transgender Woman Crowned in Pageant's History

 

Trans Athlete Debate

 

The trans athlete debate isn't about fairness in sports. If it were, there would be some degree of nuance. We'd be looking at the variances in performance gaps between cis men and women across different sports. We'd look at ages where performance gaps widen. We'd hear about how 1 year of suppressed testosterone in trans women is fine for this sport, but that other sport needs 2 years because of other factors unique to it.
 

We'd hear anything at all about trans men, people with DSD (differences in sexual development aka intersex), and non-binary athletes.
 

Instead, we're getting blanket bans for all trans kids going back to Kindergarten. Trans boys on testosterone are ignored, with all the physical advantages they gain from actually having testosterone puberty. There are no carve-outs for trans girls on puberty blockers. This isn't because of ignorance. Politicians are exposed to this information in hearings, but they do not budge. So why this approach?

 


 

It's simple. Providing any nuance at all requires first a tacit acceptance of transgender identity.
 

Forcing trans boys on T to compete with cis girls is clearly not about fairness. It's instead about refuting the boys' gender.
This is why they always use loaded, misleading, dogwhistle terms like "biological male." Social conservatives muddy the waters of the debate, disingenuously using competition framing to convince people who would otherwise be reluctant to join them in oppression of trans folk.
 

Don't fall for it. We can have lively, nuanced debates about fairness in athletic competition. But to get there, we must first accept a fairly straightforward idea: Trans women are women. Trans men are men. Non-binary people exist.  That's what this fight is actually about.

[Source: Alysandria Lynne Embergale]

 

Father of Trans Daughter Testifies Against Trans Youth Athlete Ban

Anti-Trans Violence Continues to Surge

Trans Kids: Target of Conservatives' New Culture War

Record Number of Anti-Trans Bills Introduced in States This Year
Comic Eddie Izzard Now Uses She/Her Pronouns

Jody Davis: Veteran, Nurse, Transgender

B. Scott on BET: First Trans Non-Binary Host and Producer

Elliot Page, Star of Umbrella Academy and Juno, Comes Out as Trans

Comic Eddie Izzard in Girl Mode From Now On

Trans People Who Lost Their Lives to Violence in 2020

President Biden Overturns Ban on Transgender Military Personnel

Sculpture Unveiled in NYC Honoring Trans and Nonbinary Communities

 

Transgender Day of Visibility

 

March 31 is International Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV). It is a time to celebrate transgender people around the globe and the courage it takes to live openly and authentically, while also raising awareness around the discrimination trans people still face. TDOV has also been defined as an annual awareness day dedicated to celebrating the accomplishments of transgender and gender nonconforming people while raising awareness of the work that still needs to be done to achieve trans justice.

 

Across the country and internationally there has been an increased visibility of the transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) communities. Despite increased national media visibility, this year (2020) goes on record as one of the most dangerous years for transgender and gender non-conforming people, with alarming rates of violence, homicides, and suicides - specifically impacting trans women of color and youth.

 

Transgender Day of Visibility Explained

Trans Day of Visibility: Celebrating Our Existence, Fighting for Our Rights

Flavia Music Video: Them

Introduction to Transgender People

TDOV: Honoring the Visible and Invisible (2020)

Stories of Incredible Transgender Youth

TDOV: Honoring the Visible and Invisible (2019)

Young Trans Activists to Know

State by State: Bringing Transgender Men Together

Celebrating Transgender Day of Visibility

Info: Transgender Articles, Data, and Stories

Transcending Love: Photography of B Proud

 

 

Juno Star Elliot Page Comes Out as Trans

 

‘Juno’ star Elliot Page announces he is transgender: “Hi friends, I want to share with you that I am trans, my pronouns are he/they and my name is Elliot. I feel lucky to be writing this. To be here. To have arrived at this place in my life.”

Elliot Page, best known for his role in the Oscar-nominated film Juno, announced in December 2020 that he is transgender. Page is also known for roles in Whip It, Inception, Umbrella Academy and X-Men. Elliot, formerly known as Ellen (dn), continued:

“I feel overwhelming gratitude for the incredible people who have supported me along this journey. I can’t begin to express how remarkable it feels to finally love who I am enough to pursue my authentic self. I’ve been endlessly inspired by so many in the trans community. Thank you for your courage, your generosity and for ceaselessly working to make this world a more inclusive and compassionate place. I will offer whatever support I can and continue to strive for a more loving and equal society.”

 

Elliot went on to say, “I love that I am trans. And I love that I am queer. And the more I hold myself close and fully embrace who I am, the more I dream, the more my heart grows and the more I thrive.”

“Elliot Page has given us fantastic characters on-screen, and has been an outspoken advocate for all LGBTQ people,” Nick Adams, GLAAD’s director of transgender media, said in a statement. “He will now be an inspiration to countless trans and non-binary people. All transgender people deserve the chance to be ourselves and to be accepted for who we are. We celebrate the remarkable Elliot Page.”

[Source: Nexstar, Dec 2020]

 

Time Magazine: Elliot Page Is Ready for This Moment

Variety: Elliot Page's Name Already Updated on Umbrella Academy and IMDB

Elliot Page: First Trans Man on Cover of Time Magazine

Advocate: Elliot Page, Star of Umbrella Academy and Juno Comes Out as Trans

LGBTQ Nation: Elliot Page Announces he is Transgender

Elliot Page: I Knew I Was a Boy Since I Was 9 Years Old

 

Trans Visibility: Celebrating Our Existence and Fighting for Our Rights

 

Transgender Day of Visibility exists to celebrate our existence — and to fight for our rights. Visibility brings joy and community, but it's not a panacea. We cannot take anything for granted.
 

Transgender and nonbinary people are growing more and more visible with each passing year. Just in the last year (2020), Elliot Page let the world know he’s a trans man and appeared on the cover of Time magazine, while shows like "Pose" earned critical acclaim and popularity with an incredible cast of trans actors. Trans community advocates also garnered attention in the mainstream media, including Oluchi Omeoga, a Black trans leader with Black Lives in Minneapolis and an organizer with the Black LGBTQIA Migrant Project, who was on the cover of The New York Times Magazine; and Cheyenne Dorsow, the executive director of GLITS Inc. was profiled in Time.


Trans is beautiful. Elliot Page just reminded us all of of that. And trans and nonbinary elected officials, including Minneapolis City Council Members Andrea Jenkins and Philippe Cunningham, Delaware state Sen. Sara McBride, Virginia Del. Danica Roem and Oklahoma Rep. Mauree Turner, continue to make political history. Our community has also won groundbreaking legal and policy victories. Last year, the US Supreme Court ruled in Bostock v. Clayton County that trans people are protected from discrimination in employment. (This case built on years of strategic litigation, including the Transgender Law Center’s 2012 case Macy v. Holder and decades of organizing by trans leaders across the country to assert our humanity.)


 

In 2021, there have been over 100 anti-trans bills proposed in state legislatures across the country, which is more than we have ever seen in one year. Yet we cannot truly honor the Transgender Day of Visibility this year without acknowledging the work left to do. The majority of trans people — particularly those who are Black, Indigenous and people of color, trans women and femmes, our elders, our youth, trans people living with HIV, trans people with disabilities, trans sex workers and migrants who are trans — are struggling to survive. These groups experience ongoing violence, harassment and discrimination in addition to the high rates of poverty and homelessness facing the trans community. And, in 2020, at least 44 trans and nonbinary people were killed, most of whom were Black trans women and femmes.


Conservatives wanted a new target in their culture war. They picked trans kids. Amid this violence, political attacks on trans people have escalated in recent years. It started with a wave of “bathroom bills” around 2015, attempting to criminalize which bathrooms trans people use, and intensified under the Trump administration’s relentless campaign to roll back the few rights and protections trans people do have and deny our very humanity — but it hasn't stopped. Even with a new White House and a new Congress, these attacks have continued and will continue.
 

Transgender Day of Visibility: Celebrating Our Existence and Fighting for Our Rights

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

Trans Children Across US Are Fighting For Their Lives (Again)

Arkansas Lawmakers Enact Trans Youth Treatment Ban

Trans Youth Rights: Not About Bathrooms or Women's Sports

Dr. Rachel Levine Confirmed for Assistant Health Secretary

Leyna Bloom: Makes History on Cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition

Time Magazine: Elliot Page Is Ready for This Moment

Police Officer Defends Trans Daughter Against Anti-Trans Legislation

Biden Reverses Trump's Transgender Military Ban

New Poll: 73 Percent of People Support Trans Kids in Sports

 

In 2021, there have been over 100 anti-trans bills proposed in state legislatures across the country, which is more than we have ever seen in one year. Most of the proposed legislation targets trans youth, both their access to life-saving health care and their ability to play sports as their true selves. In March 2021, Arkansas became the first state to ban young trans people from accessing health care. Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee have already passed laws this year restricting trans kids from playing sports, and South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, signed executive orders this week to do the same. But in the face of these attacks and worsening conditions, trans people are doing what we have always done: We are keeping each other safe.

I have a transgender son, and I know gender affirming parenting saves lives. Trans and nonbinary organizers developed solutions to keep one another safe when it was clear that the police and carceral systems never could. We also continued to dream up and create our own solutions to the problems our community faces. Last year, for instance, the Transgender Law Center (TLC) worked with a national coalition of majority Black and brown trans women to launch the Trans Agenda for Liberation to serve as a community-led guide toward the world trans and gender nonconforming people deserve. And while there are still many people espousing hate and intolerance, there are so many more who support trans communities. Corporations have made — and continue to make — powerful and visible stances of support. For instance, nearly 400 large businesses, including Starbucks, American Express, General Mills and Amazon, have joined efforts to support the Equality Act. We know on this day that greater visibility alone does not translate into justice and equity.

 



These stances are obviously not enough: We need businesses and donors to provide ongoing and consistent support to trans-led organizations. Grants from Gilead Sciences’ TRANScend Community Impact Fund (a unique national program that supports the safety, health and wellness of the trans community to help reduce the impact of HIV) and from the Levi Strauss Foundation’s Strategic Response Fund for vulnerable communities are vital to the community building work we do at TLC. It’s not just our organization that benefits from these collaborations. Estée Lauder, for example, also not only funds our work but uses TLC materials to educate their employees about the issues facing the trans community nationwide.

But more broadly today, only 0.03 percent of all foundation funding each year goes to trans-led organizations across the country. Corporations and individuals interested in contributing don’t have to look hard to find where to give: The TransJustice Funding Project has mapped out trans organizations across the country. Wherever you live, a trans-led organization in need of support won’t be far away.

[Source:
 Kris Hayashi, executive director, Transgender Law Center, March 2021]
 

New Survey: Most Young People Are Supportive of Transgender Peers

Elliot Page: First Trans Man on Cover of Time Magazine

Introduction to Transgender People

Advocate: Trans in Trumpland

Eddie Izzard: I'm Just Trying to Create a Space for Myself

PBS News Hour: Puberty Blockers May Improve Health of Trans Adolescents

Valentina Sampaio: Interview With Trans Fashion Model

Why We Need Trans People in the US Military

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Stories of Incredible Trans Youth

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

First Transgender Mayor Elected in France

50 Years Ago: My Sister Became My Brother

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Video Tutorial: Transgender Basics

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Changing the Way We Talk About Confirmation Surgery

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Meet a Transgender Homecoming Queen

Kim Petras: Transgender Pop Star

List: Famous Transgender People

Trans Short Film: Masked


Transgender by the Numbers

 

How many transgender people are in the US? The numbers fluctuate by state, but they also double the findings from a decade ago. An estimated 1.4 million people (around 0.6 percent of US adults) identify as transgender, according to a new study.

 

The fully urban District of Columbia has the highest percentage of adults who identify as transgender, with 14,550 people (around 2.77 percent of the federal district's population).

Several states have 100,000 or more people who identify as transgender, according to the researchers. California, with 218,000. Florida, with 100,300. Texas, with 125,350.

The highest percentages of adults identifying as transgender per state were found in Hawaii, California, Georgia, and New Mexico (all with 0.8 percent) followed by Texas and Florida with 0.7 percent, according to the study.

Five states were found to have the lowest percentages of transgender-identified adults, all with 0.3 percent: North Dakota, Iowa, Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota.

 

NPR Report: Transgender People in the US
Natural Women Only: Trans Woman Barred From Beauty Pageant

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

New York Times: Estimate of US Transgender Population Doubles
Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

CBS Sunday Morning: Growing Up Trans

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Kim Petras: Transgender Pop Music Star

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Video Message: I Am Transgender

Kids Meet a Transgender Soldier

Simply Explained: What is Transgender?

Passing Tips for Trans Girls

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Surprise: Laverne Cox Meets 25 Year Old Trans Man

Video: Young, Trans, and Looking for Love

ABC News: Transgender Parents

 

 

Gender Therapist Advice: How Do I Know if I Am Trans?

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Cory Booker: I have a Non-Binary "Niephew"

Trans Children Across US Are Fighting For Their Lives (Again)

Music Video: I Am Samantha

Watching My Son Become My Daughter

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Go Charlie: Am I Trans Enough?

Video Report: America's Transgender Children

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

Trans Teen Voted Homecoming Queen

Happily Trans: Short Documentary

Info: Cisgender

Video: Trans Youth Share Struggles and Hopes

Transgender People Killed in 2018

HRC: Parents for Transgender Equality

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

 

 

Trans Perspectives

 

“I think trans women, and trans people in general, show everyone that you can define what it means to be a man or woman on your own terms."
-Laverne Cox

“There isn’t a trans moment. It’s just a presence where there was an absence. We deserve so much more.”
-Hari Nef

“This transition has been harder on me than anything I could imagine. And that’s the case for so many others besides me. For that reason alone, trans people deserve something vital. They deserve your respect. And from that respect comes a more compassionate community, a more empathetic society, and a better world for all of us.”
-Caitlyn Jenner

“Nature made a mistake, which I have corrected.”
-Christine Jorgensen

“I dare to dream of a world where people can dress, speak, and behave how they want, free from mockery, derision, judgment, harassment, and danger."
-Juno Dawson

 


“Remember this, whoever you are, however you are, you are equally valid, equally justified, and equally beautiful.”
-Juno Dawson

“Being transgender, like being gay, tall, short, white, black, male, or female, is another part of the human condition that makes each individual unique and something over which we have no control. We are who we are in the deepest recesses of our minds, hearts, and identities.”
-Linda Thompson

“We are  in a place now where more and more trans people want to come forward and say, ‘This is who I am’.”
-Laverne Cox

“Self-definition and self-determination are about the many varied decisions that we make to compose and journey toward ourselves… It’s OK if your personal definition is in a constant state of flux as you navigate the world.”
-Janet Mock

“To all trans youth out there, I would like to say respect yourself and be proud of who you are. All human beings deserve equal treatment no matter their gender identity or sexuality. To be perceived as what you say you are is a basic right.”
-Andrej Pejic

 

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Transgender Language Primer

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Simply Explained: What is Transgender?

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Transgender Student Educational Resources

Video Story: 7 Year Old Kai on Growing Up Trans

World Health Organization: Transgender People Not Mentally Ill

Go Charlie: Am I Trans Enough?

Video Message: I Am Transgender

Advice From Gender Therapist: Am I Really Trans or Something Else?

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

 

Leyna Bloom: Sports Illustrated Trans Swimsuit Model

 

Leyna Bloom Makes History in 'Sports Illustrated' Swimsuit Issue. She is the first Black trans woman to appear in the publication.

Model and actress Leyna Bloom is no stranger to making history. Since breaking out on the scene in fashion about a decade ago — she shot with Antoine Verglas and then went on to appear in Candy's fifth-anniversary cover story — she's been putting notch after notch in her belt. The latest: she is the first Black trans woman and first Asian trans woman to appear in the lauded Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue.

 



"I never imagined that I would be born in a time where something like this would happen for someone with my skin tone and someone with my background," Bloom told Good Morning America in an interview about the feature. "This is a magazine that says we are allowed to be beautiful in all of our shapes and sizes."

Bloom comes as Sports Illustrated has steadily increased its inclusion. Last year, Valentina Sampaio became the first trans model to appear in the Swimsuit issue. In 2019 Megan Rapinoe became the first known lesbian.

"My spirit has reached new levels," Bloom wrote to Instagram about the inclusion. "This moment is bigger than my wildest infinite dreams. In this moment, I am a representation of all the communities I grew from, and all the communities I’m planting seeds in. "

 

Among other accomplishments, Bloom has been shot for Vogue India, appeared in the Moschino for H&M campaign, and also appeared in Christian Dior's Stand Up for Women campaign. She's walked in shows for both New York Fashion Week and Paris Fashion Week.

In 2019, Bloom became the first trans woman of color to lead a film premiering at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival. That project, titled Port Authority, was a love story set in part against the backdrop of the ballroom scene where Bloom has also made a name walking the category of face. The film was her acting debut.

 

[Source: Mikelle Street, Out Magazine, March 2021]

 

Leyna Bloom: Sports Illustrated's First Black, Asian, Trans Swimsuit Model

Leyna Bloom: Makes History on Cover of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition

Leyna Bloom: Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue's First Trans Cover
 

Gender Identity

 

Gender identity is one’s psychological understanding of self. It is defined in terms of perceptions and self concept. A person’s gender identity can be described as the way in which he or she views him or herself. A person might be a man (boy) or a woman (girl). Or a person might be transgender, genderqueer, two-spirit, or third-gender.

Gender identity means how you personally experience your own gender. Although it might seem straightforward, it's affected by many factors.

Sex is the label people are given by a doctor at birth depending on the genitals and chromosomes they have. It is often assumed a person’s assigned sex determines their gender, but the reality is more complex. For example, people born intersex may have what are considered ambiguous genitals or internal sex organs, sex hormones and chromosomes different to what is “typical” for a male and female body.

Most societies believe there are only two genders that people identify with in terms of their assigned sex, gender identity and gender expression: male and female. The belief that there are only two genders and that gender is fixed is called the gender binary.
 

 

Gender Therapist Advice: How Do I Know if I Am Trans?

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Video Report: America's Transgender Children

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Trans Children Across US Are Fighting For Their Lives (Again)

Understanding Gender Identity

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Info: Cisgender

Allison Faye: Transition Timeline Story

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Video Talk: Can You Define Your Gender Identity?

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

 

Gender is affected by the expectations and stereotypes society holds about the thoughts, characteristics and behaviors you will have based on your assigned sex. For example, most societies expect males to act “masculine” and females to act “feminine”. Each culture has different expectations about gender that affect a person’s social, work and legal privileges.

By a very young age, most children know what their core gender identity is and find it extremely difficult to think about themselves in any other way. People who feel pressure to follow the gender binary can experience an extreme form of distress called gender dysphoria.

 

Gender identity is about how you personally experience your own gender, regardless of what society expects. Your gender can be shown through your identity (labels, pronouns), body (appearance) and expression (how you act, how you dress). Feeling able to express your true gender identity is important to your emotional and mental health.

Gender identity is not fixed and exists on a spectrum. So people may identify as one of the binary genders, as moving between genders, as no gender or as another gender category entirely.

[Source: Kids Help Line]

 

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Info: Sexual Identity

Anti-Trans Bathroom Bills Based on Lies

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Info: Gender Expression

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Bi-Gender: Lesson in Gender Identity

ACLU: Trans People Belong

Video Tutorial: Transgender Basics

Laverne Cox Interview: Transgender is Real

WPATH: World Professional Association for Transgender Health

Ava Rose: How Do You Know If You're Trans?

Transgender Language Primer

HRC: Epidemic of Violence Against Trans People

CNN: Killings of Trans People in US Increasing

Trans Music Film: Watch Me Exist

James: Starbucks Trans Ad

Chaz Bono vs JK Rowling

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Love Letter to My Granddaughter (Who Used to Be My Grandson)

Murders of Trans People in US Could Hit Record High in 2020

 

First Our Transgender Winner on Jeopardy Game Show

 

Kate Freeman is celebrating a historic "Jeopardy!" victory as she's believed to be the first out transgender contestant to win on the long-running game show.

“Jeopardy!” fans are enjoying a recent wave of LGBTQ representation on the popular game show. Just days after contestant Cody Lawrence shined a spotlight on bisexuality by wearing a bisexual pride flag pin on an episode of the series, Kate Freeman appeared on two episodes wearing a similar accessory and making “Jeopardy!” history.

 



Freeman, a financial specialist from Lake Orion, Michigan, wore a transgender pride flag pin on her lapel. Longtime viewers believe she is the first out transgender player to ever win the game.

Writer Peter Fox tweeted a congratulatory message to Freeman, writing, “I’m assuming this victory makes her the first openly trans person to win a game.” And two-time “Jeopardy!” champ Jennifer Morrow responded to that tweet, noting there has been another trans champ, though that person came out sometime after their victory.

As for Freeman, she’s aware that her distinction on the show is an important one, which is why she wore the blue, pink and white pin. “I spent a lot of time learning about and reflecting on my gender identity in grad school, coming out as transgender and lesbian a few months before graduating,” she explained. “I’m proud to be out and I know representation is important.”

“It really lived up to my childhood dreams of being on the show,” she said. “And I was honored to be able to meet Alex before his passing.”

[Source: Ree Hines, NBC News, Dec 2020]

 

Jeopardy Game Show Contestant: First Out Transgender Winner

KateFreeman: First Out Transgender Contestant to Win on Jeopardy

Jeopardy Contestant Shines Light on Bisexuality

 

 

Transgender Rights Movement

 

The transgender rights movement is a movement to promote transgender rights and to eliminate discrimination and violence against transgender people regarding housing, employment, public accommodations, education, and health care. In some jurisdictions, transgender activism seeks to allow changes to identification documents to conform with a person's current gender identity without the need for sex reassignment surgery.

Identifying the boundaries of a trans movement has been a matter of some debate. Conventionally, evidence of a codified political identity emerges in 1952, when Virginia Prince, a male crossdresser, along with others, launched Transvestia: The Journal of the American Society for Equality in Dress. This publication is considered by some to be the beginning of the transgender rights movement in the United States, however it would be many years before the term "transgender", itself, would come into common usages.

 

In the years before the Stonewall riots, other actions for LGBTQ rights had taken place, but while gender nonconformity has always been a part of signalling gay identity, most of the early gay organizations were more assimilationist in their immediate goals.

In 1966 the Compton's Cafeteria Riot occurred in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. This incident was one of the first recorded LGBTQ-related riots in US history. Drag queens, prostitutes and trans people fought back against police harassment. When a transgender woman resisted arrest by throwing coffee at a police officer, drag queens poured into the streets, fighting back with their high heels and heavy bags. The next night, the regular patrons were joined by street hustlers, Tenderloin street people, and other members of the LGBTQ community in their stand against police violence. It marked the beginning of trans activism in San Francisco.



 

In 1969, the year of the Stonewall Riots, the term transgender was not yet in use. But gender nonconforming people like drag king Stormé DeLarverie, and self-identified "street queen" Marsha P. Johnson were in the vanguard of the riots, with DeLarverie widely believed to be the person whose struggle with the police was the spark that set the crowd to fighting back. Witnesses to the uprising also place early trans activists and members of the Gay Liberation Front, Zazu Nova and Jackie Hormona along with Johnson, as combatants "in the vanguard" of the pushback against the police on the multiple nights of the rebellion.

Marsha P. Johnson later went on to co-found Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with close friend Sylvia Rivera. Rivera's early definitions around trans were very broad, including all gender-nonconforming people. Rivera continued to be an advocate for trans rights, and inclusion of protection for trans people in all LGBTQ rights legislation, until her death in 2002.

 

Jenny Boylan: Trans Memoir From Her Dogs' Perspective
Transgender Rights Movement

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

Introduction to Transgender People

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

PBS News Hour: Puberty Blockers May Improve Health of Trans Adolescents

Flavia Music Video: Them

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

Valentina Sampaio: Interview With Trans Fashion Model

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Young Trans Activists to Know

Born This Way: Stories of Transgender Children

Happily Trans: Short Documentary

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Video Story: My Friend is Transgender

World Health Organization: Transgender Not a Disorder

Indya Moore: Elle Magazine's First Trans Cover Model

My Trans Life: I'm That Scary Transgender Person

Kentucky Mom Honors Transgender Son

Video Talk: Trans Questions and Answers

Meet a Transgender Homecoming Queen

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Kids Help Line: What is Gender Identity?

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Chazzie: Story of a Transgender Girl and Her Parents

Trans Short Film: They Them

 

 

Transgender Celebrities

 

Caitlyn Jenner - Athlete
Chaz Bono - Activist
Janet Mock - Magazine Editor
Kate Bornstein - Author
Kim Petras - Singer, Songwriter
Jazz Jennings - Activist
Danica Roem - Politician

Elle Hearns - Activist
Indya Moore - Model
Wendy Carlos - Musician
Deirdre McKloskey - Economist
Ky Allums - Athlete
Misty Snow - Politician

Raquel Willis - Activist

Caroline Paige - Pilot

Teddy Geiger - Musician

Daniela Vega - Actor, Singer

Buck Angel - Performer, Educator

Angela Clayton - Physicist

Mya Byrne - Musician

Christine Jorgensen - Activist

Tracey Norman - Model

Stu Rasmussen - Politician

Stef Sanjati - YouTuber

Rosemay Ketchum - Politician

Jenny Boylan - Author, Educator

Glenn Copeland - Composer

Monica Roberts - Journalist

Tommy Dorfman - Actor

Laverne Cox - Actor
Sarah McBride - Activist

Elliot Page - Actor

Angelica Ross - Entrepreneur

Alan L Hart - Physicist, Researcher

Angela Ponce - Model
Chelsea Manning - Soldier

Genny Beemyn - Educator

Jess Herbst - Politician
Carmen Carrera - Model

Nicole Maines - Actor
Laura Jane Grace - Punk Rock Musician
Lynn Conway - Engineer

Jamie Clayton - Model, Actor
Renee Richards - Athlete
Stacie Lawton - Politician
Margaret Stumpp - Business Executive

Erika Ervin - Model, Trainer, Actor
Kylar Brody - Activist
Jenna Talackova - Model
Leelah Alcorn - Artist

Marie Cau - French Politician

Maxine Feldman - Singer, Songwriter

Rachel Levine - Physician

Allyson Robinson - Army Officer

Sophie Wilson - Computer Scientist

Leo Sheng - Actor

Aaryn Lang - Media Personality, Activist

Andrea Jenkins - Politician

 

 

Celebrity Spotlight: Genderqueer, Non-Binary, Transgender

Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Identities

Kids Help Line: What is Gender Identity?

First Transgender Mayor Elected in France

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

Info: Gender Expression

PBS Video: Transgender Issues

Lisa Ling and EJ Johnson Tackle Gender Identity

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

Gender and Gender Identity

List: Famous Transgender People

Music Video: I Am Samantha

Passing Tips for Trans Girls

Kids Meet a Transgender Soldier

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

GLAAD: Transgender Terminology

Video Talk: Can You Define Your Gender Identity?

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Male Celebrities That Were Born Female

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Casey Blake Video: Transgender Transition Timeline

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Teen Talk: Trans Guy Problems

Wikipedia: Gender Identity

HRC: Understanding the Transgender Community
Info: Deadnaming

Trans and Gender Queer Over 50

 

 

Gender Dysphoria

Gender dysphoria, or gender identity disorder (GID), is the distress, discontent, and discomfort (and possible impairment) a person experiences as a result of the sex and gender they were assigned at birth. In these cases, the assigned sex and gender do not match the person's gender identity, and the person is considered to be transgender.

According to Psychology Today, "gender dysphoria (formerly gender identity disorder) is defined by strong, persistent feelings of identification with the opposite gender and discomfort with one's own assigned sex that results in significant distress or impairment. For instance, a person identified as a boy may feel and act like a girl."

The American Psychiatric Association states that "gender nonconformity is not in itself a mental disorder. The critical element of gender dysphoria (or gender identity disorder) is the presence of clinically significant distress associated with the condition."

The main psychiatric approaches to treatment for persons diagnosed with gender dysphoria are psychotherapy, hormone replacement therapy, or sex reassignment surgery.

 

MTF: Insecurity and Dysphoria
Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Identities

Video Tutorial: Transgender Basics

Transgender Police Officer

Transformation: Male to Female

Dwayne Wade's Trans Daughter Makes Red Carpet Debut

Wikipedia: Gender Identity

Transition Advice: Should I Start HRT?

Trans Boy: I Started Living My Life Instead of Just Surviving

Gender and Gender Identity

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Teen Talk: Trans Guy Problems

Janet Mock: Trans Role Model

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Info: Sex and Gender

PBS News Hour: Puberty Blockers May Improve Health of Trans Adolescents


 

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Music Video: I Am Samantha

On the Front Lines: Battle for Trans Equality

Kim Petras: Transgender Pop Star

Counselor Competencies for Working With Transgender Clients

Allison Faye: Transition Timeline Story

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Eye Opening Facts About Being Transgender

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Info: Sexual Identity

How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

ABC News: Transgender Parents

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

Male Celebrities That Were Born Female

Advice From Gender Therapist: Am I Really Trans or Something Else?

 

I'm Sorry: Open Letter to a Transgender Young Person

 

Dear Friend,
 

I don’t know your story. I cannot imagine how you feel. I can’t fathom how difficult this road has been for you: the swirling storm of the questions inside your head, the hidden fears you’ve had to constantly keep at bay, the incessant worries about the responses of those you love to your full truth—and to have to endure all of it while living inside a space that does not feel like home.

 



There’s no way to place myself inside your shoes or your skin and even begin to understand how much it hurts be the target of the scalding hatred of strangers simply for existing, the way that must wound your heart and alter your days and hinder your joy.
That is a reality I’ll never know and I so hate that it is your reality: not that you are who you are but that people are who they are in response, that your inherent beauty is met with such undeserved ugliness.
 

I just want you to know that I see you, that I am for you, that I am in your corner as you struggle to simply be and to breathe freely and to step fully into the dreams you have for the future. I want you to know that I am fighting for you today as I am able, and that I will keep fighting for you because you are so worth fighting for.
 

 

I want you to know that even though it may feel that way inside your head or in your home or at your school—you are not alone. I and millions of other people believe in you and want you to have every opportunity to live this life as the most authentic version of yourself; people who celebrate you fully and support you without reservation. I also want you to know that I am sorry. I’m sorry for the people who injure you with taunts and threats and sermons and laws and fists, because they are somehow threatened by your existence.

That is a reflection of their ignorance and fear, not of your worth. I’m sorry for those who terrorize you in the name of a God they also claim is love. They do not speak for God. They only speak for their bigotry-addled, polluted hearts and for the distorted religion they have inherited from people who failed them. They are strangers to love.

 


 

I’m sorry for the silence of people who should have spoken up when you were mocked and made fun of by strangers, when you were the object of jokes spoken in your presence, when your dignity and your rights were used as cheap culture war props of pastors and politicians, when those you counted on for refuge refused to provide it. I know there are difficult days ahead for you, and that these words won’t magically make your worries evaporate or silence the bullies or give wisdom to the hateful people in your path.
 

I only hope these words can be a companion in the days when the fear feels like it will overwhelm you, when the sadness threatens to swallow you up, when the monsters are prevalent and close, when there seems to be no safe space to simply rest in your truth, when you begin to believe that no one around you sees or loves or believes in you. I see you. I love you. I believe in you. So many people do.

 


You may not feel that way when you are in your home or when you walk through your neighborhood or when you watch the news about your nation—but the world is so much larger than those things, and one day you will get to experience that wide-open, expansive space and you will do it surrounded by a fiercely loving community that sees and respects you as you fully are. In that day, you will no longer need to strive to feel known and welcomed, you will simply realize that you are.

And one day you will be able to step into the day as all of you, as fully you, without limitation or restraint, you will be home. Until then, please know that I and so many others are standing with you from here and cheering you on; that we will work to change legislation and to renovate hearts and to shout down the bullies because you are worth that.
Be greatly encouraged today.

[Source: John Pavlovitz, March 2021. John Pavlovitz is a writer, pastor, and activist from Wake Forest, North Carolina. A 25-year veteran in the trenches of local church ministry, John is committed to equality, diversity, and justice—inside and outside faith communities.]

 

John Pavlovitz: Open Letter to a Transgender Young Person

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Ally Guide for Trans and Non-Binary Youth

World Health Organization: Transgender Not a Disorder

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

PBS Video: Transgender Issues
 

Kim Petras: Transgender Pop Music Star

 

Kim Petras (born August 1992) is a popular German singer and songwriter, currently based in Los Angeles. Petras was born and raised in Cologne, Germany where she had become subject of media coverage after undergoing gender transition at a young age. Petras began recording music as a teenager, releasing her debut extended play "One Piece of Tape" in 2011. She independently released her debut single in 2017, "I Don't Want It at All," which went on to top several viral music charts. The song was followed by Billboard-charting singles "Feeling of Falling," "Heart to Break," and "123 Dayz Up."

 

Kim Petras was born as Tim Petras (dn). Her parents, Lutz and Konni, have said that from the age of two, she began insisting she was a girl. It became apparent this was "not just a phase," and her parents tried to be supportive but made her wear gender neutral clothes in public. Eventually her parents sought professional help but struggled to find people who were knowledgeable on the subject. In time they found Bernd Meyenburg at Frankfurt University who was head of a clinic for children and had studied transsexuality since the 1970s.

 

Kim Petras: Pop Music Princess Breaking Barriers

Trans Documentary: The Kim Petras Story

Bio: Kim Petras

Kim Petras: Official Website

Glamour Interview: Kim Petras on Bering Transgender

Kim Petras: Transgender Pop Star

Heart to Break: Kim Petras Music Video

Kim Petras: Interview With German Trans Girl

2009 Interview with Kim Petras: Youngest Trans Girl

 

Sex Reassignment Surgery

 

What used to be called a sex change operation, is now called sex reassignment surgery or SRS (also known as gender reassignment surgery, gender confirmation surgery, genital reconstruction surgery, gender-affirming surgery, or sex realignment surgery). It is the surgical procedure (or procedures) by which a transgender person's physical appearance and function of their existing sexual characteristics are altered to resemble that socially associated with their identified gender. It is part of a treatment for gender dysphoria in transgender people. Related genital surgeries may also be performed on intersex people, often in infancy.

    

 

Not all transgender individuals seek to change their physical sex. Changing your physical sex as an adult may be the biggest change that a person could experience. It should only be done with people that can only happily function in the opposite gender role.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (representing 94% of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States) prefers to call this procedure Gender Confirmation Surgery or GCS. Another term for SRS is sex reconstruction surgery, and more clinical terms, such as feminizing genitoplasty or penectomy, orchiectomy, and vaginoplasty, are used medically for trans women, with masculinizing genitoplasty, metoidioplasty or phalloplasty often similarly used for trans men.

People who pursue sex reassignment surgery are usually referred to as transsexual.

The best known of these surgeries are those that reshape the genitals (penis or vagina), which are also known as genital reassignment surgery or genital reconstruction surgery (GRS). It is also referred to as bottom surgery. Top surgery, on the other hand, is surgery to the breasts (augmentation or reduction).

    

 

The procedure has very high rates of success when it is performed by responsible and experienced surgeons. However with current surgical technology male to female individuals usually are more satisfied with their results than female to male. Modern sex reassignment surgery has been performed for over 60 years. There are on average 50 SRS procedures performed each week in North America alone.

The meaning of "sex reassignment surgery" has been clarified by the medical subspecialty organization, the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH), to include any of a larger number of surgical procedures performed as part of a medical treatment for "gender dysphoria" or "transsexualism". According to WPATH, medically necessary sex reassignment surgeries include "complete hysterectomy, bilateral mastectomy, chest reconstruction or augmentation (including breast prostheses if necessary), genital reconstruction (by various techniques which must be appropriate to each patient), and certain facial plastic reconstruction." In addition, other non-surgical procedures are also considered medically necessary treatments by WPATH, including facial electrolysis.

 

Wikipedia: Sex Reassignment Surgery

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Gender Affirming Surgery Linked to Better Mental Health

Passing Tips for Trans Girls

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Music Video: I Am Samantha

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Gigi Gorgeous: Story of a Trans Woman

Trans Tips: Beginning Transition

Changing the Way We Talk About Confirmation Surgery

Stef Sanjati: I'm Getting Sex Reassignment Surgery

Boobs: Candid Talk About Top Surgery

TS Surgery Guide: Sex Reassignment Surgery

 

 

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Trans Girls Handbook: Dealing With Dysphoria

Video Diary: I Got Top Surgery

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

I Know I'm Trans: Should I Transition? Part 1

Casey Blake Video: Transgender Transition Timeline

Washington Post: Here's How Sex Reassignment Surgery Works

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Transgender Video: Passing

MTF Transgender Journey: After Sex Reassignment Surgery

Ava Rose Trans Info: Transition Tips

Video Chat: How Hormones Changed My Body

Jazz Jennings: Battle Wounds From Gender Confirmation Surgery

Carmen Carrera: Personal Thoughts on Being Trans

Transition Advice: Should I Start HRT?

 

Surgical Procedures

 

Feminizing Genitoplasty for Trans Women (MTF) refers to surgeries to alter or create female genitals, including the clitoris, labia, and vagina.

Bottom Surgery for Trans Women involves Penectomy (surgical removal of the penis), Orchiectomy (surgical bilateral removal of the testicles, and Vaginoplasty (surgical construction/reconstruction of the vagina).

Top Surgery for Trans Women involves Breast Augmentation (surgical construction/reconstruction of chest/breasts through use of implants).

 

Masculinizing Genitoplasty for Trans Men (FTM) refers to surgeries to alter or create male genitals, including the penis, testicles, and scrotum.

Bottom Surgery for Trans Men involves Metoidioplasty (surgical modification/lengthening of the clitoris), Phalloplasty (surgical construction/reconstruction of the penis), and Scrotoplasty (surgical construction/reconstruction of the scrotum).

Top Surgery for Trans Men involves Mastectomy (surgical bilateral removal of breasts).
 

Feminizing Genitoplasty Surgery

Masculinizing Genitoplasty Surgery

Penectomy Defined

Breast Augmentation/Implants Defined

Sex Reassignment Surgery (Female to Male)

Sex Reassignment Surgery (Male to Female)

Trans Tips: Beginning Transition

Boobs: Candid Talk About Top Surgery

I Know I'm Trans: Should I Transition? Part 2

Jazz Jennings: Battle Wounds From Gender Confirmation Surgery

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

What is Sex Like for a Trans Woman Post-Op?

Gender Affirming Surgery Linked to Better Mental Health

MTF Transgender Journey: After Sex Reassignment Surgery

Metoidioplasty Defined

Video Chat: How Hormones Changed My Body

Ava Rose Trans Info: Transition Tips

 

 

MTF Surgery: Vaginoplasty and Dilation

 

Vaginoplasty Explained


A vaginoplasty is a surgical procedure where a vagina is created. It involves removing the penis, as well as the testicles and scrotum, if an orchiectomy was not previously performed. A vaginoplasty involves rearranging the current tissue in the genital area to create the vaginal canal and external genitalia, the labia. To create the vaginal canal, the surgeon uses a combination of the skin surrounding the existing penis in addition to the scrotal skin. Sometimes, an additional skin graft from the abdomen or thigh is needed to achieve a full vaginal canal.

Dilation Explained


The purpose of dilation is to maintain the depth of the new vagina. Dilation helps prevent contraction of the skin graft inside vagina and also improves the elasticity of vaginal wall in order to comfortably accommodate penetrative sex. Dilation involves inserting a lubricated dilator into the neo-vagina and keeping it in there for a specified amount of time. The size of dilator and the length of dilation time varies depending on the surgeon's protocol and patient's needs. Your surgeon will advise about the proper use and frequency of post-op dilation and it's important to follow their advice above all as it may be specific to your case. Initially, one can expect dilation to take up about 2 hours per day, with the time and frequency decreasing after you reach 18-24 months post-op.

Transgender Care: Vaginoplasty Procedures and Aftercare
MTF Surgery: Imoportance of Dilation Following Vaginoplasty
Johns Hopkins Medicine: Vaginoplasty Questions Answered
Trans Surgery: MTF Frequently Asked Questions
Pelvic Hub: MTF Post-Surgery Care
MTF Personal Guide: Post-Op Dilation Tips
 

 

Types or Categories of Transgender People

 

Many identities fall under the transgender umbrella. The term transgender refers to people whose gender identity is different from their assigned sex. Often, transgender people alter or wish to alter their bodies through hormones, surgery, and other means to make their bodies as congruent as possible with their gender identities. This process of transition through medical intervention is often referred to as sex or gender reassignment, but more recently is also referred to as gender affirmation. People who were assigned female, but identify and live as male and alter or wish to alter their bodies through medical intervention to more closely resemble their gender identity are known as transgender men or transmen (also known as female-to-male or FTM). Conversely, people who were assigned male, but identify and live as female and alter or wish to alter their bodies through medical intervention to more closely resemble their gender identity are known as transgender women or transwomen (also known as male-to-female or MTF). Some individuals who transition from one gender to another prefer to be referred to as a man or a woman, rather than as transgender.

 

Older terminology usage differentiated between "transgender" and "transsexual."  In common usage a transgender person was someone whose gender identity is different from their assigned sex, but chose NOT to undergo full surgery.  And a transsexual person was someone whose gender identity is different from their assigned sex, but chose to undergo full surgery.  These days the term "transsexual" is generally not used and respectful conversations should not focus on the pre-op and post-op status of the trans person.

 

Feminism and Equality: What Trans Women Want You to Know

Video: The Science of Being Transgender

Transitioning at Age 70

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Info: Sexual Identity

Video Message: I Am Transgender

Male Celebrities That Were Born Female

Trans Sistas of Color Project

Genderquake (Part 1)

Glossary of Transgender Terminology

Video: Young, Trans, and Looking for Love

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

PFLAG: Our Trans Children

Watching My Son Become My Daughter

 

 

Simply Explained: What is Transgender?

Meet a Transgender Homecoming Queen

Gender Affirming Surgery Linked to Better Mental Health

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Huff Post: Transgender News

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Eye Opening Facts About Being Transgender

Info: Gender Non-Conforming

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

On the Front Lines: Battle for Trans Equality

PBS Video: Transgender Issues

Video: Trans 101 Basics

Counselor Competencies for Working With Transgender Clients
Gender Therapist Advice: How Do I Know if I Am Trans?

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Genderquake (Part 2)

First Transgender Mayor Elected in France

Transgender Language Primer

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Transgender Law Center

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video


People who cross-dress wear clothing that is traditionally or stereotypically worn by another gender in their culture. They vary in how completely they cross-dress, from one article of clothing to fully cross-dressing. Those who cross-dress are usually comfortable wi
th their assigned sex and do not wish to change it. Cross-dressing is a form of gender expression and is not necessarily tied to erotic activity. Cross-dressing is not indicative of sexual orientation. The degree of societal acceptance for cross-dressing varies for males and females. In some cultures, one gender may be given more latitude than another for wearing clothing associated with a different gender.

The term drag queens generally refers to men who dress as women for the purpose of entertaining others at bars, clubs, or other events. The term drag kings refers to women who dress as men for the purpose of entertaining others at bars, clubs, or other events.

 


 

What Not to Say When Your Child Comes Out as Transgender

Trans Bathrooms: Nationwide Debate

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Trans People Are Not a Threat to You

John Oliver: Transgender Rights

Trans Short Film: They Them

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

Ava Rose Trans Info: Transition Tips

Erin Anderson: Beautiful MTF Transgender

If You Think Trans Bathroom Access Doesn't Matter...

Info: Gender Queer

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

What it Means to Be Transgender/Gender Non-Conforming

Dwayne Wade's Trans Daughter Makes Red Carpet Debut

Transgender Q&A

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Feminism and Equality: What Trans Women Want You to Know

Affirmations: Parents and Their Trans Kids

Ranker: Transgender Historical Figures

TED Talk: Gender is Not a Straight Line

Music Video: I Am Samantha

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Ranker: Famous Transgender People

Info: Sex and Gender

Transgender History

 



Genderqueer is a term that some people use who identify their gender as falling outside the binary constructs of “male” and “female.” They may define their gender as falling somewhere on a continuum between male and female, or they may define it as wholly different from these terms. They may also request that pronouns be used to refer to them that are neither masculine nor feminine, such as “zie” instead of “he” or “she,” or “hir” instead of “his” or “her.” Some genderqueer people do not identify as transgender.

Other categories of transgender people include androgynous, multigender, gender nonconforming, third gender, and two-spirit people. Exact definitions of these terms vary from person to person and may change over time, but often include a sense of blending or alternating genders. Some people who use these terms to describe themselves see traditional, binary concepts of gender as restrictive.

[Source: American Psychological Associatio
n]
 

Info: Deadnaming

Harris Poll: Growing Acceptance of Transgender Issues

NBC Today Show: Discussion with Transgender Teens

Genderquake (Part 1)

Natural Women Only: Trans Woman Barred From Beauty Pageant

Video: Struggles of Transgender Youth

Disrespectful Hospital Staff: Trans Teen Commits Suicide

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

Carmen Carrera: Personal Thoughts on Being Trans

Wikipedia: Gender Dysphoria

Info: Cisnormativity

More Than Half of Transgender Men Have Attempted Suicide

Video Talk: Trans Questions and Answers

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Genderquake (Part 2)

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Psych Central: Gender Dysphoria Symptoms

Video Lesson: Anti-Trans Slurs

TED Talk: Gender is Not a Straight Line

Video Report: America's Transgender Children

 

 

Laura Jane Grace: Trans Punk Rocker

 

Laura Jane Grace (born Thomas James Gabel, 1980, and known to her earlier fans as such) is an American musician best known as the founder, lead singer, songwriter and guitarist of the punk rock band Against Me!. In addition to Against Me!, Grace fronts the band Laura Jane Grace & The Devouring Mothers, a solo project she started in 2016. Grace is notable for being one of the first highly visible punk rock musicians to come out as transgender, after she publicly came out in May 2012.
 

Bio: Laura Jane Grace

Androgynous by Joan Jett, Miley Cyrus, Laura Jane Grace

Laura Jane Grace and the Devouring Mothers

Laura Jane Grace Interviewed by Seth Meyers

Therapy Video: Laura Jane Grace

True Trans Soul Rebel by Laura Jane Grace and Miley Cyrus

NPR Interview: Laura Jane Grace

Forbes Article: Laura Jane Grace

 

Respectful Language

 

Misgendering and deadnaming are offensive and hurtful acts for transgender people. Using their preferred pronouns and preferred name show respect.

People who are transgender or gender variant experience some sense of discomfort and dysphoria in having to deal with the mismatch of their external presentation with their internal feelings regarding being male or female. To cope with those feelings… and to affirm their true gender… they may choose a new name along with a new pronoun that more accurately expresses their identity.

A male who identifies as female, for example, may, in addition to wearing women’s clothing and make-up, choose a female-sounding name and prefer to be addressed as she and her.

For people who are transgender or gender variant, the simple act by another person of using a preferred pronoun or preferred name can make a big difference. It is a profound display of respect.

“Deadnaming” occurs when someone intentionally or accidentally refers to a transgender person by the name they used before they transitioned. “Misgendering” occurs when someone intentionally or accidentally refers to a transgender person by the pronoun they used before they transitioned.

By the way, none of this is related to a transgender person’s surgical status. And it is inappropriate to talk about a transgender person’s pre-operative or post-operative situation or how far they are in their transition. A person is still considered to be transgender whether they have undergone surgery or not.

 

Info: Deadnaming

Info: Preferred Pronouns

Info: Cisnormativity

Info: Gender Non-Conforming

 

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy

 

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is transgender hormone therapy for transgender people which introduces hormones associated with the gender that the patient identifies with, notably testosterone for transgender men and estrogen for transgender women. Some intersex people may also receive HRT. Cross-sex hormone treatment for transgender individuals is divided into two main types: feminizing hormone therapy and masculinizing hormone therapy. Feminizing hormone therapy in sex reassignment therapy for transgender women. Masculinizing hormone therapy in sex reassignment therapy for transgender men.

HRT can be administered in pill form or as an injection to boost or replace the body's natural hormones. HRT is also used by older cisgender women to relieve the symptoms of monopause. Older cisgender men may also benefit from HRT.

 

What Happens When Transgender People Start Hormone Therapy?

Video: How HRT Changes a Transwoman's Body

Transition Advice: Should I Start HRT?

Guide to Hormone Therapy for Trans People

Video Chat: How Hormones Changed My Body

 

Danica Roem Makes Political History

 

Trans woman Danica Roem (D) defeated anti-LGBTQ candidate Bob Marshall (R) in Virginia. Ironically, the man who wrote the anti-trans bathroom bill lost the election to a trans woman. Virginia’s most socially conservative state lawmaker was ousted from office on Nov 7, 2017 by Danica Roem, a Democrat, who will be one of the nation’s first openly transgender elected officials and who embodies much of what Bob Marshall fought against in Richmond.

 

Danica Roem defeated incumbent Republican Bob Marshall, 73, on having campaigned on a platform of social inclusion as well as local issues, such as building up infrastructure and job creation. it also exposed the nation’s fault lines over gender identity.

The race pitted a 33-year-old former journalist who began her physical gender transition four years ago against a 13-term incumbent who called himself Virginia’s “chief homophobe” and earlier this year introduced a “bathroom bill” that died in committee.

“Discrimination is a disqualifier,” a jubilant Roem said. “This is about the people of the 13th District, disregarding fear tactics, disregarding phobias, where we celebrate you because of who you are, not despite it.”

 

Wasington Post: First Trans Person Elected to Public Office in Virginia
LA Times: Danica Roem Defeats Chief Homophobe

NBC News: Trans Woman Elected to Virginia State Legislature

LGBTQ Nation: Virginia's New Transgender Legislator

 

Transgender Speaker at Democratic Convention

 

Twenty-five-year-old Sarah McBride made history when she took center stage at the Democratic National Convention, at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, in July 2016, as the first openly transgender person to address a major party convention.

 

McBride, who works as the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign, is no stranger to breaking down barriers. Four years earlier, as student body president at American University, the then-21-year-old made national headlines when she came out as transgender in the school's student-run paper, The Eagle. Later in 2012, when she interned at the White House Office of Public Engagement, she was the first out trans woman to work at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

More recently, McBride stepped into the national spotlight for a viral selfie she took while inside a women's restroom in North Carolina, where a controversial law enacted last March bans transgender people from using government building bathrooms in line with their gender identities.

 

 

Trans Stories

 

Video: FTM Transgender Timeline

My Trans Life: I am the Scary Trans Person the Media Warned You About

Transgender Kids

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Trans Boy: I Started Living My Life Instead of Just Surviving

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Angie Bouros: Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Watching My Son Become My Daughter

Allison Faye: Transition Timeline Story

Trans Kids Share Their Stories

Jazz Jennings: Confirmation Surgery

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Stef Sanjati: He Didn't Know I Was Transgender

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

Kai Shappley: 7 Year Old on Growing Up Trans

Gigi Gorgeous: Story of a Trans Woman

Janet Mock: Knowing My Gender Identity With Certainty

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Born This Way: Stories of Transgender Children

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Transgender Teen Shares Powerful Message

Jazz Jennings: Battle Wounds From Gender Confirmation Surgery

 

 

Transgender Terminology

 

Transgender - Often used as an umbrella term and refers to those who transgress societal gender norms. Generally, people who identify as transgender exhibit some behavior or traits that fall outside of traditional gender expectations. Specifically, however, the term refers to a person whose gender identity differs from what is culturally associated with their biological sex at birth.

Transsexual - An old term referring to a transgender person who undergoes full sex reassignment surgery. In fact only some, but not all, transgender people wish to change their bodies to be congruent with their gender identity through sex reassignment surgery. This term "transsexual" is considered outdated.

Gender Dysphoria - Discomfort with an assigned sex and/or gender and/or the gender norms and roles associated with either.

Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS) – Term used by some medical professionals to refer to a group of surgical options that alter a person’s biological sex. Also called Gender Confirmation Surgery (GCS). In most cases, one or multiple surgeries are required to achieve legal recognition of gender variance.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) - Taking hormones to enable one’s outward appearance to conform more closely to one’s inner gender identity.

MTF – Abbreviation for male-to-female transgender person or transwoman.

FTM – Abbreviation for female-to-male transgender person or transman.

Top Surgery – Term refers to surgery for the construction of a male-type chest or breast augmentation for a female-type chest.

Bottom Surgery - Term refers to Sex Reassignment Surgery involving genital reconstruction.

Cisgender - Person whose gender identity and biological sex (assigned at birth) align. The opposite of transgender.
 

 

Transgender Language Primer

CBS Sunday Morning: Growing Up Trans

Music Video: I Am Samantha

World Health Organization: Transgender People Not Mentally Ill

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Genderquake (Part 1)

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

Trans Short Film: Masked

Video Story: My Friend is Transgender

Simply Explained: What is Transgender?

Gender Therapist Advice: How Do I Know if I Am Trans?

Info: Gender Expression

HRC: Parents for Transgender Equality

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

NBC Today Show: Discussion with Transgender Teens

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Cher Talks About Her Trans Son Chaz

 

 

Gift Guide for Parents With Trans Kids

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Gender Affirming Surgery Linked to Better Mental Health

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Ranker: Transgender Historical Figures

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

Video: Growing Up Transgender and Mormon

Genderquake (Part 2)

Chazzie: Story of a Transgender Girl and Her Parents

Video Chat: How Hormones Changed My Body

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

Info: Cisnormativity

Erin Anderson: Beautiful MTF Trsansgender

Transgender Teen Shares Powerful Message

Video Lesson: Anti-Trans Slurs

Feminism and Equality: What Trans Women Want You to Know

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

Zander Keig: Latinx Trans Social Worker

Video: I Got Top Surgery

Lisa Ling and EJ Johnson Tackle Gender Identity

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

 

 

Relevant Terminology

 

Androgyny - Mixing of masculine and feminine characteristics. Something that is neither masculine nor feminine.

Drag - Act of dressing in gendered clothing as part of a performance. Drag may be performed as a political comment on gender, as parody, or simply as entertainment. Drag performance does not indicate sexuality, gender identity, or sex identity. Old term: Transvestism.

Intersex - Naturally occurring condition that affects the reproductive and sexual system. Intersex people are born with sex chromosomes, external genitalia, or internal reproductive systems that are not considered "standard" for either male or female. The existence of intersex shows that there are not just two sexes and that our ways of thinking about sex (trying to force everyone to fit into either male box or female) is socially constructed.

Gender Bender/Gender Queer - Person who redefines or plays with gender, or who refuses gender altogether. People who bend/break the rules of gender and blur the boundaries.

Cross Dresser - Person who enjoys dressing in clothes typically associated with the other gender. Preferred over the term “transvestite.” Cross dressers may be of any sexual orientation.

Two-Spirited - Term for third-gender people that are among many Native American and Canadian First Nations tribes. It usually implies a masculine spirit and a feminine spirit living in the same body. It is also used by gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and intersex Native Americans to describe themselves. Two-Spirited people have distinct gender and social roles in their tribes. Some are counselors while others are medicine persons or spiritual functionaries. They typically possess skills in story telling, theater, magic, hypnotism, healing, herbal medicine, ventriloquism, singing, music and dance.

 

Genderbread Person

Transgender Language Primer

Genderquake (Part 1)

Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Identities

Gigi Gorgeous: Story of a Trans Woman

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

Info: Cisnormativity

Gender and Gender Identity

New Study: Transgender Youth and Suicide Risk

Info: Deadnaming

Meet a Transgender Homecoming Queen

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Video Story: 7 Year Old Kai on Growing Up Trans

Wikipedia: Gender Identity

GLAAD: Transgender Terminology

Info: Sexual Identity

Affirmations: Parents and Their Trans Kids

Genderquake (Part 2)

Scarleteen: Sex Ed For The Real World

Kids Meet a Transgender Soldier

Info: Preferred Pronouns

Wikipedia: Gender Dysphoria

Natural Women Only: Trans Woman Barred From Beauty Pageant

Video Chat: How Do You Know You're Transgender?

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Info: Gender Non-Conforming

Glee Video: If I Were a Boy

 

 

Puberty Blockers

 

Puberty blockers (puberty inhibitors, puberty suppressors, hormone suppressors) are a group of medications used to inhibit puberty. They were originally used to treat children with precocious puberty or other such early onset of puberty. Puberty blockers are commonly used for the transgender community. In this community, puberty blockers are used to provide transgender youth with time to further explore their identity, while halting the development of their predisposed sex characteristics caused by the onset of puberty.

The medication that is used in order to stop puberty comes in two forms: injections or an implant.

Puberty blockers prevent the development of biological secondary sex characteristics. They slow the growth of sexual organs and production of hormones. Other effects include the suppression of male features of facial hair, deep voices, and Adam's apples for children and adolescents and the halting of female features of breast development and menstruation.

Transgender youth are a specific target population of puberty blockers. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists (leuprorelin, histrelin) to halt puberty, can be used for transgender youth before the development of natal secondary sex characteristics.

Puberty blockers serve the transgender community by giving future trans men and trans women more time to solidify their gender identity, without developing secondary sex characteristics. If a child later decides not to transition to another gender, the effects of puberty blockers can be reversed by stopping the medication. Another function of puberty blockers is that it gives the future transgender individual a smoother transition into their desired gender identity as an adult.

 

Wikipedia: Puberty Blockers

Health Topic: Blocking Puberty in Transgender Youth

PBS News Hour: Puberty Blockers May Improve Health of Trans Adolescents

Video: Struggles of Transgender Youth

AMA: Suppression of Puberty in transgender Children

Puberty Blockers and Hormones for Trans Kids

Video: Trans Youth Share Struggles and Hopes

 

Deadnaming

 

"Deadnaming" is the act of referring to a transgender person's birth name instead of their chosen name. It is the practice of uttering or publishing the name that a transgender person used prior to transition.

Most of the time, an individual will pick a new name as soon as they begin to identify as the gender they know they are on the inside. This new name, in a way, marks the "death" of their old identity and the person they once were. With a new name, they signify a new, more truthful, and more fully realized phase of their life.

 

For many people who are transgender, undergoing a name change can be an affirming step in the transition process. It can help a transgender person and the people in their lives begin to see them as the gender they know themselves to be. It can also alleviate discomfort that may be associated with one’s old (former, previous) name.

Transgender and genderqueer people really want other people to forget their previous name. Unfortunately, many people may struggle to adhere to a transgender person’s new, affirmed name. In some situations, other people may refuse to acknowledge the change altogether. And in situations that involve official identification, having a legal name that doesn’t align with one’s affirmed name can cause people serving in official capacities (administrators, employers, government officials, legal entities) to inadvertently refer to a trans person by the wrong name or gender.

 

Uninformed cisgender (straight) people might comment about a trans person’s “real” name, as if the new name a trans person uses is somehow less real than the one given to them at birth, when they were assigned male or female. It is seen as a verbally violent offense that attempts to invalidate a person’s authentic gender identity.

Deadnaming occurs when someone, intentionally or accidentally, refers to a transgender person by the name they used before they transitioned. You may also hear it described as referring to someone by their “birth name” or their “given name.”

 

Finding Your Name
Deadnaming a Trans Person is Psychological Violence

Why is Deadnaming Harmful?

James: Starbucks Trans Ad

Don’t Deadname Caitlyn Jenner

Info: Deadnaming

Deadnaming: Referring to Myself in Past Tense

Words Matter: Deadnaming and Suicide

Simple Animation Explanation: Using They/Them Pronouns

Info: Preferred Pronouns

We Need to Stop Deadnaming Trans People

Video: Misgendering is an Act of Violence

Info: Cisnormativity


Call Me Caitlyn

 

The transgender Olympic champion, publicly known as Bruce Jenner (dn), revealed her true self in a photo shoot by Annie Leibovitz and interview with Buzz Bissinger in Vanity Fair Magazine in June 2015. In the interview, Jenner speaks movingly about her journey, saying, "If I was lying on my deathbed and I had kept this secret and never ever did anything about it, I would be lying there saying, You just blew your entire life." In April 2015, Jenner sat down for an interview with Diane Sawyer to reveal that the former Olympian had the "soul of a female" and now wants to be called Caitlyn.

 

Jenner, 65, who won an Olympic gold medal in the decathlon, has had a long public life. She had been on the cover of Playgirl, an author, an actor and most recently a part of the Kardashian family’s reality television empire. Earlier in 2015, reports emerged that she was in the process of becoming a woman.
 

YouTube: Caitlyn Jenner Photo Shoot

CNN: No More Bruce

NY Times: Caitlyn Jenner Introduces Herself in Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair: Introducing Caitlyn Jenner

 

Gender Terminology

 

Gender - Socially constructed collection of traits, behaviors, and meanings that we use as a standard for how biological differences should be represented.

Gender Identity - Person’s fundamental sense of their own gender. This can include identifying as a combination of genders or refusing to label oneself with a gender. Gender identity is often confused with or considered tied to sexual orientation, but this is inaccurate. Gender identity and sexual orientation are exclusive off each other.

Gender Normative (Gender Conformity, Gender Straight) - When your gender identity and sex “match” (fit social norms). For example, a male who identifies and behaves in traditionally masculine ways and identifies as a man. A term used to describe someone whose gender presentation, whether by nature or by choice, aligns with society’s gender-based expectations.

Cisgender - Term referring to a person who is not transgender. It refers to a person whose gender identity and biological sex assigned at birth are in alignment.

Cisnormativity - Assumption that all, or almost all, individuals are cisgender. Although transgender-identified people comprise a fairly small percentage of the human population, many trans people and allies consider it to be offensive to presume that everyone is cisgender unless otherwise specified.

Gender Expression - Outward behaviors and appearances (hair, clothing, voice, body language) by which people manifest their gender identity or gender choices.

Gender Roles - Socially constructed and culturally specific norms of behavior and appearance expectations imposed based on biological sex (femininity and masculinity).

Sex Identity - The sex that a person sees themselves as. This can include refusing to label oneself.

 

CBS Sunday Morning: Growing Up Trans
Janet Mock: Knowing Her Gender Identity With Certainty

Transgender Language Primer

Matt Nathanson: The Girl in the Kinks Shirt
Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Genderquake (Part 1)

Natural Women Only: Trans Woman Barred From Beauty Pageant

Five Things Not to Say to a Trans Person

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Grieving a Child Who is Still Alive

Really Cool Gender Neutral Bathroom Signs

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Transgender Police Officer

Expert Tips for Cis People Who Want to Be Better Trans Allies

Me As A Girl: Transition Timeline

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Documentary: Transgender Kids

Gift Guide for Parents With Trans Kids

Genderquake (Part 2)

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

New Study: Transgender Youth and Suicide Risk

Gigi Gorgeous: Story of a Trans Woman

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

National Transgender Discrimination Survey

Gender Identity: A New Challenge for Schools

 

 

Binding and Tucking

 

Binding, tucking, packing, and padding are some do-it-yourself (or non-surgical) options used by transgender people for altering gender expression.

Binding - Wearing tight clothing, bandages, wrapping, or compression garments to flatten out your chest.

Tucking - Using "gaffs" to hide the penis and testicles so they are not visible in tight clothing.

Packing - Using a non-flesh, artificial, or prosthetic penis (sometimes referred to as a "packer").

Padding - Using undergarments, breast forms, and foam to create the appearance of larger breasts, hips, and buttocks.

 

Trans Care: Safe Binding and Tucking Tips

GC2B Transitional Apparel: Binders

Truth About Chest Binding

Special Garments to Aid Binding and Tucking

Origami Customs: Gaffs

Trans Health: Binding and Tucking Information

Simple Animation Explanation: Binders

Gaffs 101: Tucking Safely and Comfortably

 

Laverne Cox

 

Transgender activist, Laverne Cox, star of the hit Netflix series "Orange is the New Black," was featured on the cover of Time Magazine in June 2014. She was interviewed by Time about her life, current issues, and the transgender movement.

 

Bullied and harassed for appearing feminine while growing up in Mobile, Alabama, Cox eventually came out as transgender while living in New York City and took up acting. Now a star on the Netflix drama "Orange Is the New Black", she has emerged as a public leader of the trans movement, using her increasingly prominent perch to make the case for equal rights and touring the country giving speeches.
 

Laverne Cox in Time Magazine

Laverne Cox: Website

Laverne Cox: Wikipedia

Laverne Cox: IMDb

 

 

Identity Development

 

Based on D’Augelli’s Model of LGB Identity Development (1994), the processes do not necessarily occur linearly nor does every transgender person experience each process. It should also be noted that the term “transgender” covers a wide variety of identities. Individuals may experience the stages in different ways or to different degrees depending on how they specifically identify and the particular restrictions or prejudices that society places on that identity.

Exiting a Traditional Gender Identity - Involves recognition that one is gender variant, attaching a label to this identity, and affirming oneself as gender variant through coming out to others.

Developing a Personal Transgender Identity - Entails achieving the stability that comes from knowing oneself in relation to other transgender people and challenging internalized transphobia.

Developing a Transgender Social Identity - Focuses on creating a support network of people who know and accept that one is gender variant.

Becoming a Transgender Offspring - Consists of coming out as transgender to family members and reevaluating relationships that may be disrupted by the disclosure.

Developing a Transgender Intimacy Status - Involves the creation of intimate physical and emotional relationships.

Entering a Transgender Community - Involves making a commitment to political and social action and understanding identity through challenging transphobia.
 

GLAAD: Transgender Terminology

Gigi Gorgeous: Story of a Trans Woman

Info: Gender Expression

Video List: Most Famous Transgender People Worldwide

Genderquake (Part 1)

Maya Henry: Things Not to Say to Trans Girls

Transgender Universe

Counselor Competencies for Working With Transgender Clients

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

Gift Guide for Parents With Trans Kids

Harris Poll: Growing Acceptance of Transgender Issues

Shattering Myths: Trans Women's Bodily Concerns

Info: Gender Queer

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Kovu Kingsrod: I'm a Soft Boy and That's Okay

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Woman

Genderquake (Part 2)

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Watching My Son Become My Daughter

Transgender Police Officer

How Do I Know if I am Trans?

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video


 

Jazz Jennings

 

Jazz Jennings (born 2000) is an American YouTube personality, spokesmodel, television personality, and LGBTQ rights activist. Jennings, a transgender teenage girl, is notable for being one of the youngest publicly documented people to be identified as transgender, and for being the youngest person to become a national transgender figure.

Jennings received national attention in 2007 when an interview with Barbara Walters aired on the 20/20 television program, which led to other high-profile interviews and appearances. Christine Connelly, a member of the board of directors for the Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth, stated, "She was the first young person who picked up the national spotlight, went on TV and was able to articulate her perspective and point of view with such innocence." Her parents noted that Jennings was clear on being female as soon as she could speak.

 

Jennings is an honorary co-founder of the TransKids Purple Rainbow Foundation, which she and her parents founded in 2007 to assist transgender youth. In 2013, she founded Purple Rainbow Tails, a company in which she fashions rubber mermaid tails to raise money for transgender children.

Jennings hosts a series of YouTube videos about her life, entitled "I Am Jazz", making her one of the youngest trans females in history to speak out on issues publicly. Jennings stars in the TLC reality TV series, "I Am Jazz," which focuses on her life with her family as a teenager and as a transgender youth. The series premiered on July 15, 2015.
 

Wikipedia: Jazz Jennings

Jazz Jennings on Facebook

Jazz Jennings Talks About Bottom Surgery

Jazz Jennings: Battle Wounds From Gender Confirmation Surgery

Jazz Jennings on YouTube

Derick Dillard Criticizes Jazz Jennings

 

Ignorant and Insensitive Remarks About Trans Kids

 

Following an outcry on social media over his anti-trans statements, Access Hollywood TV host Mario Lopez has apologized for assertions he made on the air in June 2019 when he called it “dangerous” for parents to support their transgender children. “The comments I made were ignorant and insensitive, and I now have a deeper understanding of how hurtful they were,” Lopez said. “I have been and always will be an ardent supporter of the LGBTQ community, and I am going to use this opportunity to better educate myself. Moving forward I will be more informed and thoughtful,” he added.

Lopez was in conversation with Candace Owens (conservative ideologist, Trump supporter) about trans kids, saying it was “weird” that celebrities like Charlize Theron’s child are “picking their gender.”

"I'm kind of blown away, too," Lopez said. “If you're 3-years-old and you're saying you're feeling a certain way or you think you're a boy or a girl or whatever the case may be, I just think it's dangerous as a parent to make that determination.”

“It's sort of alarming. I just think about the repercussions later on,” Lopez added. Lopez went on to conflate gender and sexuality. "When you're a kid you don't know anything about sexuality yet. You're just a kid,” he said.

 

Inspirational Stories of Trans Kids and Supportive Parents

Dysphoria: What Does it Feel Like?

Being a Trans Kid is Hard

Transgender Expert Offers Tips to Parents

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Here's What Parents of Transgender Kids Need to Know

Advice for Parents Whose Child Just Came Out to Them as Transgender

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

Info: Deadnaming

Sex Change Treatment for Kids

Chazzie: Story of a Transgender Girl and Her Parents

Video Talk: Am I Normal?

On the Front Lines: Battle for Trans Equality

Trans Terms You Should Know

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

Video: Trans 101

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

What Not to Say When Your Child Comes Out as Transgender

 

GLAAD CEO Sarah Kate Ellis said in a statement that Lopez "clearly needs a primer on trans issues. Medical and psychological experts, and parents of transgender children have long discredited the ideas that Mario Lopez shared,” Ellis said. “The real 'dangerous action' is when someone with a public platform uses bad science to speak against a marginalized and vulnerable group of children."

Catherine Hyde (who currently serves on the PFLAG National Board of Directors, has also served on the Howard County Human Rights Commission, and was named a Hometown Hero by the Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore) also voiced her opposition to Mario Lopez’s misguided remarks.​

She said, “Ignorance is not benign. Not knowing enough about trans children is not a crime, but judging others while refusing to learn the facts is inexcusable. And Ignorance is harmful. But, thankfully, through investigation, exploration, and education, ignorance is most definitely repairable.”

She went on to relate her personal insight. In April 2019, actress Charlize Theron revealed that her child is transgender. “Yes, I thought she was a boy, too,” Theron said, “Until she looked at me when she was three years old and said, ‘I am not a boy!'”

Hyde said, “Unlike TV host Mario Lopez, I understood exactly what Ms. Theron was talking about.”
 


 

Huff Post: Broader Acceptance of Gender Non-Conformity

Slideshow: Transgender Resources

Trans and Gender Queer Over 50

On the Front Lines: Battle for Trans Equality

Genderquake (Part 1)

Meet a Transgender Homecoming Queen

Counselor Competencies for Working With Transgender Clients

Glee Video: If I Were a Boy

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

Harris Poll: Growing Acceptance of Transgender Issues

Maya Henry: Things Not to Say to Trans Girls

Transgender Child: Mom, I'm Not a Girl

Statistics on Transgender Mental Health

Critical Facts About State of Transgender America

Transgender Teen Shares Powerful Message

Trans Girls Handbook: Dealing With Dysphoria

 

Here is Catherine Hyde’s story:

In 1993, my husband, a former Marine, and I brought into this world a child we did not understand and did not know how to parent. Gender identity (which is defined as one’s deeply held core sense of being a woman, a man, some of both, or neither) is an inherent part of who we are. We are all born with it. Yes, even non-transgender (cisgender) people have a gender identity, and it cannot be changed. Very few people understand that. But ignorance is not benign.

Early on, I noticed that my then-son displayed habits that would typically be described as “feminine.” By the age of three, once my child had words, they told me that “something went wrong in your belly, Mom. I was supposed to be a girl.” As supportive, concerned, and loving parents, my husband and I went to see a child psychologist who told us to "discourage girl play and encourage boy play, only allow boy toys and boy clothing." Trusting the child expert, we did that, and by the age of six, my child was threatening suicide.

Suicidal ideation in transgender people is sadly common. In fact, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality’s 2015 US Transgender Survey (the largest survey examining the experiences of transgender people in the United States) 40 percent of respondents attempted suicide, nearly nine times the attempted suicide rate in the US population (4.6 percent). So back to the therapist we went, who diagnosed depression and anxiety. Understandable, of course, since we had been essentially shaming our child for years. But again there was no mention of gender. We did not get educated, and we did not stop the shaming. Ignorance is harmful.
 

 

TED Talk: Gender is Not a Straight Line

Sex Assigned at Birth vs Gender Identity

How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

Info: Preferred Pronouns

Glossary of Transgender Terminology

Gender Revolution: Gavin Grimm's Story

Ranker: Famous Transgender People

Chazzie: Story of a Transgender Girl and Her Parents

Shattering Myths: Trans Women's Bodily Concerns

Info: Gender Queer

TED Talk: How to Talk (and Listen) to Transgender People

Psych Central: Gender Dysphoria Symptoms

Video Talk: Trans Questions and Answers

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Queer 101: Ask a Trans Man

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

Inspirational Stories of Trans Kids and Supportive Parents

Genderquake (Part 2)

Jenny Boylan: Trans Memoir From Her Dogs' Perspective

 

At 15, after years in the darkest place imaginable, my child finally told me their truth: They were male on the outside and female on the inside. I exploded. "You can be as gay as you want, but if you go trans on me, it's on your own dime and it's out of my house!" When I think about that now...well, truthfully, it’s still hard to think about that now.

Then, I heard an episode of NPR’s This American Life about transgender children and what happens when they are supported versus when they are not supported by their families. The statistics are staggering. According to the Family Acceptance Project, “LGBTQ teens who were highly rejected by their parents and caregivers were at very high risk for health and mental health problems when they become young adults (ages 21-25). Highly rejected young people were more than eight times as likely to have attempted suicide, six times as likely to report high levels of depression, three times as likely to use illegal drugs, and three times as likely to be at high risk for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases.”

By the end of that NPR episode, I knew without a doubt that my child was transgender. I also knew without a doubt that, despite our fierce love for our child and our belief that we had been supportive, our lack of education and understanding had caused her to suffer, for years. After all, how could we have been really supporting her without the education to understand exactly who she was and what she needed from us? Thankfully, ignorance is repairable.
 

 

APA: Answers to Questions About Transgender Issues

Chilean Movie Makes Transgender Oscar History

Things Trans People Want You to Know

National Center for Transgender Equality
Video: Trans Youth Share Struggles and Hopes

HuffPost: Transgender Suicide Hotline

Harris Poll: Growing Acceptance of Transgender Issues

Video Talk: Trans Questions and Answers

Transgender Teen Shares Powerful Message

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Center for Gender Sanity

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

 

We learned about gender identity, and how it differs from gender expression (the manner in which a person communicates their gender to others through external means, and which may or may not reflect their gender identity or sexual orientation), and sexual orientation (one’s emotional, romantic, or sexual feelings toward other people). We learned about how gender identity manifests, even in very young children. We read books, we joined support groups, we found people to answer our questions. We did everything we could to better understand our child.

And once we better understood her, we were able to support her the way she needed to be supported, including her transition starting in 10th grade (recognizing that “transition” is different for each transgender person). Her depression and anxiety steadily lifted, and today she is happy, healthy, and thriving. And what parent doesn’t want to be able to say that about their kids? Isn’t that the lifelong goal?

From the beginning, my daughter was insistently, persistently, and consistently stating that she was a girl. We just didn’t see it or hear it. Or didn’t want to. I wish I’d had earlier access to the information I needed to support her through her journey of self-exploration, willing to accept whatever outcome lay at the end of that road, transgender or not.

 

It’s because of my early lack of education and understanding that my heart is open to those who are now where I was then. I understand when people like Mr. Lopez and others conflate gender and sexual orientation. After all, lots of people now have a better understanding of what it means to be gay or lesbian, but no understanding at all (yet, I say hopefully) of what it means to be transgender. I get how they hear the word “transition” and think of medical interventions instead of haircuts, name changes, and clothing exchanges, which are the types of things children exploring their gender at young ages are focused on. It’s because of my journey to understanding that I’m willing to meet people right where they are, whatever their level of understanding, to have the challenging conversations, over and over and over again. Because ignorance is not benign. Ignorance is harmful. But, through investigation, exploration, and education, ignorance is most definitely repairable.

I encourage everyone to find that education. It is out there. Great organizations (like PFLAG, HRC, GLAAD) with important resources, glossaries, support groups. And there are thousands of people like me who are willing to talk, listen without judgement, and answer questions. Because in my view there really are no dumb questions. I know, because in the last 20 years I’ve probably asked all of those questions myself. Thankfully, I found the resources I needed, including generous people, to answer them. My daughter’s very life depended on these people, and I don’t know where my family would be now, if not for them.

Ms. Theron said of her children, “My job as a parent is to celebrate them and to love them and to make sure that they have everything they need in order to be what they want to be.” And to that I say, YES, Ms. Theron. That’s my job. That is the job of everyone who parents or cares for a child. We owe it to them to get the education, ask the questions, and support them the way they need to be supported. Because their lives depend on it.

[Source: Advocate Magazine, August 2019]

 

Video Chat: How Do You Know You're Transgender?

By the Numbers: Transgender Community
How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

Things Trans People Want You to Know

Video Talk: Can You Define Your Gender Identity?

Genderquake (Part 1)

Debunking Transgender Predator Bathroom Myth

Video Lesson: Anti-Trans Slurs

Inspirational Stories of Trans Kids and Supportive Parents

Video List: Most Famous Transgender People Worldwide

Unconditional Love: Parents' Journey With Transgender Child

Info: Deadnaming

Gender Therapist Advice: Can I Trust the Way I Feel?

Things Trans People Want You to Know

NBC Today Show: Discussion with Transgender Teens

Laverne Cox on the Cover of Cosmopolitan Magazine

Transgender Terms and Labels

 

Kylar Brodus

 

In June 2012, the Senate Health and Labor Committee, chaired by Senator Tom Harkin, held a hearing on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, a bill that would create a federal ban on discrimination against gays, lesbians, bisexual, and transgender people in the workplace. The measure has been introduced in every congressional session since 1994.

 

The witness panel included one openly transgender person, Kylar Brodus, founder of the Trans People of Color Coalition, who spoke in support of the ENDA bill. Brodus is the first transgender person to testify at a US Senate hearing.
 

C-SPAN Video: Senate Hearing on ENDA
Metro Weekly: Senate Hearing Includes Trans, Business and Legal Witnesses
Washington Blade: First Transgender Person to Testify at US Senate


Helpful Trans Tips

 

Outing - Remember that revealing the transgender status of any transgender person without his or her expressed permission has the same potential for harm as outing a gay man, lesbian, or bisexual man or woman. Outing is an invasion of privacy.

Appearance - Do not assume that someone who appears to be cross-dressed is a "transvestite." That person may or may not be living full-time in their presenting gender, or they may intend to do so in the future. Instead of the stigmatizing "transvestite", use the terms male cross-dresser or female cross-dresser if it's clear that they are not living full-time nor intend to do so.

Living Status - If a transgender person is living full-time in a gender not associated with their birth sex, that person should be referred to at all times with terms appropriate to their presenting gender, regardless of their surgical status or body state.

--Transgender Woman (Trans Woman) is an appropriate term for Male-To-Female (MTF) persons.
--Transgender Man (Trans Man) is an appropriate term for Female-to-Male (FTM) persons.
--Transgender Person (Trans Person) is an appropriate term for someone of either above types.
--Transgender People (Trans People) is an appropriate term for mixed groups.

Surgical Status - Almost all transsexuals (pre-operative, post-operative, non-operative) and many transgender people are extremely sensitive about their surgical status and/or their body's physical state. Questions about this should be avoided or, if medically necessary, asked very sensitively. Moreover, this information should be considered confidential and should not be shared with others unless it is medically necessary. Regardless of their surgical status, the appropriate term for a Male-To-Female Transgender person is Transgender Woman, and for a Female-to-Male Transgender person, Transgender Man.


Quotation Marks - Avoid aspersion by not using quotation marks. Never put pronouns or possessive adjectives of transgender persons in quotes. Never put their sexual orientations or genitalia in quotes.

 

Pronouns and Possessive Adjectives - It is extremely offensive to refer to transgender persons using pronouns and possessive adjectives that refer to their birth sex. Use pronouns and adjectives appropriate to the transgender person gender expression. If you are uncertain, ask what they prefer. Some people prefer the new pronoun ze (pronounced “zee”) in lieu of she/he, and the new possessive adjective hir (pronounced “here”) in lieu of his/her.

Self-Identification - Not all transgender people use the same terminology to describe themselves. When in doubt, just ask an individual transgender person how they wish to be identified. If you’re not sure how to address someone, just ask. Or simply use their first name or last name. It's sometimes customary for patients or clients in clinical situations to be addressed by their last name when it’s time to see their providers.
 

Trans Lifeline

Transgender Suicide Hotline

Genderbread Person

Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Identities

Gender and Gender Identity

Info: Deadnaming

TED Talk: Gender is Not a Straight Line

Genderquake (Part 2)

National Transgender Discrimination Survey

Trans Terms You Should Know

Video: Trans 101

Info: Cisnormativity

Transgender Universe

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

Wikipedia: Gender Identity

Glee Video: If I Were a Boy

Glossary of Transgender Terminology

Info: Sex and Gender

Scarleteen: Sex Ed For The Real World

Trans and Gender Queer Over 50

 

Coy Mathis

 

"They're telling me I'm a boy when I'm really a girl."

Rolling Stone Magazine ran an amazing article in October 2013 about a young boy who wanted to become a girl. Sabrina Rubin Erdely's article is about the journey of Coy Mathis and her parents' process of coming to terms with the transgender issue.

 

Coy's parents regarded his fascination with all things sparkly, ruffly and pink as the harmless play of a toddler whose mind was yet untouched by social constructs of "masculine" and "feminine." Coy was one of four siblings (a triplet with a same-age sister and brother, plus an older sister) and so was surrounded by both "girl" and "boy" toys, inside their cramped split-level house, where the living room was covered by a patina of puzzle pieces and stray Legos. Kathryn and Jeremy figured it was just a matter of time before Coy sorted it out for himself.

"When am I going to get my girl parts?" he asked softly one day. "What do you mean?" asked his mother. "When are we going to go to the doctor to have me fixed?" Coy asked, tears now spilling down his cheeks. "To get my girl parts?" That's when it dawned on Kathryn Mathis, with a sinking feeling, that she and her husband were dealing with a very serious issue. The lengthy article, published by Rolling Stone, is incredibly touching and filled with profound details and lots of links to related articles. It is a "must read."
 

Coy Mathis: One Child's Fight to Change Gender
Being a Trans Kid is Hard

Gender Therapist Advice: Can I Trust the Way I Feel?

Video Story: 7 Year Old Kai on Growing Up Trans

NBC Today Show: Discussion with Transgender Teens

Transgender Expert Offers Tips to Parents

Eye Opening Facts About Being Transgender

Documentary: Transgender Kids

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Allison Faye: Transition Timeline Story

Here's What Parents of Transgender Kids Need to Know

Advice for Parents Whose Child Just Came Out to Them as Transgender

Male Celebrities That Were Born Female

Teen Talk: Trans Guy Problems

Mom, I'm Not a Girl: Raising a Transgender Child

Gift Guide for Parents With Trans Kids

ABC News: Transgender Parents

Video: Young, Trans, and Looking for Love

Born This Way: Stories of Transgender Children

Video Chat: How Do You Know You're Transgender?

Sex Change Treatment for Kids

 

Transgender Needs

 

Transgender persons may identify as heterosexual, so they may not be dealing with issues of sexuality. However, depending on how they sexually identify, transgender people may face discrimination from both heterosexuals and LGB people.

They may experience more verbal and physical attacks than most LGB people if they cross-dress or otherwise “look gender variant.”

 

They are generally less accepted in society than LGB people, in large part due to ignorance. There is little understanding of transgender lives. They are not visible in popular culture beyond stereotypes and almost no research has been done on their experiences.

They sometimes experience a lack of acceptance and support from the LGB community.

As a result of the lack of acceptance and support in the dominant culture and in the LGB community, they often lack a strong community and positive role models or images. Consequently, transpeople, especially trans youth, may feel isolated and marginalized.

Transpeople may want to remain closeted because of the legitimate fear of how they will be treated by their professors, employers, co-workers, friends, and others in their field.

Transpeople often have a hard time finding medical help that is knowledgeable and understanding concerning transgender issues.

If transitioning, they will need to change their identification as well as other records and documents. Keep in mind that different states and institutions have different rules about when and if these changes are possible.

They are especially vulnerable to attack, harassment, and/or embarrassment when trying to use the gender appropriate bathroom.

Transpeople often have others refer to them as a gender different than the one with which they wish to identify or insist on calling them by their given name even though they have changed it.

[Source: Beemyn, B., 2003, Serving the needs of transgender college students. Journal of Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education]

 

Affirmations: Parents and Their Trans Kids

Huff Post: Broader Acceptance of Gender Non-Conformity

Gender Therapist Advice: Can I Trust the Way I Feel?

Slideshow: Transgender Resources

Genderquake (Part 1)

Dwayne Wade's Trans Daughter Makes Red Carpet Debut

HRC: Parents for Transgender Equality

Info: Gender Queer

Statistics on Transgender Mental Health

Ava Rose Trans Info: Transition Tips

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

PBS Video: Transgender Issues

Critical Facts About State of Transgender America

Info: Preferred Pronouns

Matt Nathanson: The Girl in the Kinks Shirt
Advice From Gender Therapist: Am I Really Trans or Something Else?

Genderquake (Part 2)

Go Charlie: Am I Trans Enough?

Five Things Not to Say to a Trans Person

Info: Cisnormativity

Video Talk: Am I Normal?

Grieving a Child Who is Still Alive

World Health Organization: Transgender People Not Mentally Ill

Gender Identity: A New Challenge for Schools

Info: Deadnaming

Video List: Most Famous Transgender People Worldwide

 

Chaz Bono

 

In June 2009, Chaz Bono, the 40 year old child of Sonny and Cher, transitioned from female to male. After many years of consideration, he has made the courageous decision to honor his true identity. He is proud of his decision and grateful for the support and respect of loved ones. It is Chaz's hope that his choice to transition will open the hearts and minds of the public regarding this issue, just as his coming out did nearly 20 years ago.

 

 

Chaz Bono: The Pain of Looking at Old Photographs

Daily News: Chaz Bono Changing Gender From Female to Male
Chaz Bono: When I Knew I was Transgender

Sonny & Cher Show 1975: Cher and Chaz

Chaz Bono Opens Up About Becoming a Man

Chastity Bono (dn) on the Cher Show

E On-Line: Chaz Bono Transition
Sonny & Cher Christmas Special 1975 with Chastity (dn)

ABC News: Chaz Bono Gives Voice to Invisible Community
Sonny & Cher with Chastity (dn)

MSNBC: Cher's Child Undergoing Sex Reassignment

 

Hardships for Transgender Youth

 

Transgender youth often face enormous hardships when they acknowledge and express their gender identity.

They may be thrown out of the house when their family discovers that they are transgender, often forcing them to live on the streets.

They typically face harassment and abuse in school to such an extent that they quit, which makes it hard for them to get decent-paying jobs (for example, a survey of more than 250 transgender people in Washington, DC found that forty percent had not finished high school and another 40 percent were unemployed).

Even if they are able to get an education, they have difficulty finding and keeping almost any kind of job because of discrimination, forcing some to become sex workers.

If they live on the streets or are a sex worker, they are at a greater risk for abusing drugs, becoming infected with HIV, and being subjected to anti-transgender violence.

Many lack access to health care, including proper counseling and medical supervision for those who are in the process of transitioning. And when they do get medical treatment, they frequently face discrimination and hostility from health-care workers. Consequently, some transsexuals decide to treat themselves by buying underground hormones, which can contain dangerous if not deadly chemicals.

Because gender reassignment surgery can cost more than $100,000 and is not covered by most health insurance policies, even most middle-class transsexuals cannot afford the procedures.

The ultimate result is often high rates of depression, drug and alcohol abuse, and thoughts of suicide among transgender people (thirty-five percent of the respondents to the DC survey mentioned above reported that they had seriously considered suicide).

Many transgender people who can “pass” will choose to remain closeted, so trans youth often do not have visible role models and mentors.

[Source: Beemyn, B., 2004, Legal and Political Rights of Transgender People, Ohio State University, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Student Services Web]

 

Info: Deadnaming

Info: Preferred Pronouns

Info: Cisnormativity

Info: Gender Non-Conforming

 

 

Teachable Moment: Lesson From a Science Teacher

 

I just saw a transphobic post that was like, "In a sexual species, females have two X chromosomes and males have an X and a Y chromosome. I'm not a bigot. It's just science."

Well, I am a science teacher, so I posted the following comment.

First of all, in a sexual species, females can be XX and males can be X, as in insects. Females can be ZW and males can be ZZ, as in birds. And females can be females because they developed in a warm environment and males can be males because they developed in a cool environment, as in reptiles. Females can be females because they lost a penis in a sword fighting contest, as in some flatworms. Males can be males because they were born female but changed sexes because the only male in their group died, as in parrotfish and clownfish. Males can look and act like females because they are trying to get close enough to actual females so they can mate with them, as in cuttlefish and bluegills. Or you can be one of thousands of sexes, as in slime molds and some mushrooms.

Oh, did you mean humans? Okay then. You can be male because you were born female, but you have 5-alphareductase deficiency and so you grew a penis at the age of 12. You can be female because you have an X and a Y chromosome, but you are insensitive to androgens, and so you have a female body. You can be female because you have an X and a Y chromosome, but your Y is missing the SRY gene, and so you have a female body. You can be a male because you have two X chromosomes, but one of your X's has a SRY gene, and so you have a male body. You can be male because you have two X chromosomes, but also a Y chromosome. You can be a female because you have only one X chromosome at all. And you can be a male because you have two X chromosomes, but your heart and brain are male. And vice versa.

Don't use science to justify your bigotry. The world is way too weird for that shit.  Class dismissed.

[Source: Science Teacher, Facebook]

 


 

Trans People: Come Out Come Out Wherever You Are

Born This Way: Stories of Transgender Children

Video Journey: My 20 Year FTM Timeline

Trans Woman Responds to Hate Mail and Violence

Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Identities

CBS Sunday Morning: Growing Up Trans

Trans Boy: I Started Living My Life Instead of Just Surviving

Watching My Son Become My Daughter

Me As A Girl: Transition Timeline

Personal Insight: Nurse Who Cares for Gender Surgery Patients

Odd Things Cis People Say to Trans People

James: Starbucks Trans Ad

Video Tutorial: Transgender Basics

Gender and Gender Identity

Trans Sistas of Color Project

Video Chat: How Do You Know You're Transgender?

Girls to Men: Jamie's Transgender Transition Timelapse

Documentary: Transgender Kids

How the Mothers of Transgender Children Are Changing the World

Transgender Teen Shares Powerful Message

State by State: Bringing Trans Men Together

Alice: Transgender Story

New Study: Transgender Youth and Suicide Risk

NBC Today Show: Discussion with Transgender Teens

Simple Animation Explanation: Gender Dysphoria

Transformation: Male to Female

Kids Meet a Transgender Soldier

Video List: Most Famous Transgender People Worldwide

Affirmations: Parents and Their Trans Kids

Scarleteen: Sex Ed For The Real World

Video Talk: Can You Define Your Gender Identity?

PBS News Hour: Puberty Blockers May Improve Health of Trans Adolescents

Being a Trans Kid is Hard

Gift Guide for Parents With Trans Kids

Transgender Expert Offers Tips to Parents

Video Story: My Friend is Transgender

On the Front Lines: Battle for Trans Equality

Changing: Trans Teen Music Video

 

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