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GAY

 

Wikipedia: Definition of Gay

Video: What Does Gay Mean?

Info: Sexual Orientation

PBS Video: History of the Word Gay

Romeo and Julio

TED Talk: Why Am I So Gay?

True Definition of Gay

How Gay Came to Mean Homosexual

Info: LGBTQ Community

HuffPost: In Praise of Visiting the Gay Bar

Gay Guyde: What Does Gay Mean?

Male Montage: Blame it on the Girls

Video: Boyfriend Adventure

Jamie's Coming Out Story

 

Definition
 

The word “gay” describes a man who is romantically, emotionally, and/or sexually attracted to or involved with other men. As a sexual orientation, it can be further defined as an innate, enduring, inherent, and immutable pattern of feelings and behavior in which a man has an affectional, romantic, emotional, spiritual, sensual, and/or sexual affinity or desire for other men. Clinically speaking, it refers to homosexual men.

It can also be used as an umbrella term for everyone who has same-sex romantic/sexual attractions or relations.

 



“Gay” is a word that primarily refers to a homosexual person, especially a homosexual man. The term was originally used to refer to feelings of being "carefree", "happy", or "bright and showy." It had also come to acquire some connotations of "immorality" as early as 1637.

The term's use as a reference to homosexuality may date as early as the late 19th century, but its use gradually increased in the 20th century. In modern English, "gay" has come to be used, as an adjective and as a noun, to refer to the people, especially to men, and the practices and cultures associated with homosexuality. By the end of the 20th century, the word "gay" was recommended by major LGBTQ groups and style guides to describe people attracted to members of the same sex.
 

 

Some reject the term "homosexual" as an identity-label because they find it too clinical-sounding. They believe it is too focused on physical acts rather than romance or attraction, or too reminiscent of the era when homosexuality was considered a mental illness.

Style guides, like the one used by Associated Press, call for the literary or journalistic use of the word "gay" over "homosexual." The term ”homosexual” tends to sound too technical to be appropriately used in writing, speech, and conversations focused on people and their relationships. Use of the term “homosexual” is only appropriate in the context of discussing academic, clinical, scientific, or medical research.

Conversely, some reject term "gay" as an identity-label because they perceive the cultural connotations to be undesirable or because of the negative connotations of the slang usage of the word.

 

Other terms related to the word "gay" include... Men Having Sex With Men (MSM) and Men Loving Men (MLM).

 

PBS Video: History of the Word Gay

Wikipedia: Definition of Gay

Video: Why Are Homosexual People Called Gay?

Gay Love

He's Not My Boyfriend

Johns Hopkins: Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Issues

Awareness Advocacy Project: What Does Gay Mean?

Male Montage: To Love Somebody

Video Discussion: Gay Men Describe What it Means to be Gay

Gays You'll Date Before You Die

NIH Report: Effects of Masculine Ideals on Gay Men

Francis and Nicholas

Video Documentary: The Gay Word

Wikipedia: Homosexuality

Accepting Yourself: Being Gay is Not Easy

SPLC: Anti-Gay Myths Debunked

 

 

Male Montage: Trouble Makers

Video: Hottest Openly Gay Male Celebrities

Michael and Ben

Your Song: My Love My Life

Land of Storms: Fine Line

For Anyone Who's Been Told It's Just a Phase

Kang Guk and Tae Joo: Take Me Apart

Rock and Archie: Can't Take My Eyes Off of You

HuffPost: In Praise of Visiting the Gay Bar

Somebody to Love

Alex and Winston: Someone You Loved

Come At Me Bro

Male Montage: Blame it on the Girls

Homosexual Men

Research: Unique Stressors for Gay Men

True Definition of Gay

Video: What Does Gay Mean?

Steve's Coming Out Story


 

Terminology

Just as the word "gay" is sometimes used as a shorthand for the term LGBTQ, so is "gay community" sometimes a synonym for the LGBTQ community. In other cases, the speaker may be referring only to homosexual men. Starting in the mid-1980s in the United States, a conscious effort was underway within what was then called the gay community, to add the term lesbian to the name of all gay organizations that catered to both male and female homosexuals, and to use the terminology of gay and lesbian, or lesbian/gay when referring to that community.

 



So, organizations like the National Gay Task Force became the National Lesbian/Gay Task Force. For many ardent feminist lesbians, it was also important that the L come first, lest an L following a G become another symbol of male dominance over women. In the 1990s, this was followed by another equally concerted push to include the terminology specifically pointing out the inclusion of bisexuals and transgender people, reflecting an end to the intra-community debate as to whether these other sexual minorities were part of the same sexual liberation movement.

 

In the 2000s it became commonplace to add Q to the acronym, at first to to recognize "questioning" persons and then to more broadly encompass "queer" persons (an umbrella term for a variety of sexual minorities). Most news organizations have formally adopted this use, following the example and preference of the LGBTQ organizations, as reflected in their press releases and public communications. Today, many people interpret the phrase "gay community" to mean "the population of LGBTQ people."

 

 

 

HRC: Responding to Children's Questions About LGBTQ Issues

Video Talk: Dating is Difficult for a Gay Guy

He's Not My Boyfriend

Rock and Archie: Rescue My Heart

Awareness Advocacy Project: What Does Gay Mean?

Info: Sexual Orientation

Video: Why Are Homosexual People Called Gay?

NIH Report: Effects of Masculine Ideals on Gay Men

Homosexual Men

Info: LGBTQ Community

Video Discussion: Gay Men Describe What it Means to be Gay

Male Montage: To Love Somebody

For Anyone Who's Been Told It's Just a Phase

PBS Video: History of the Word Gay

 

 

 

Gay Movie Montage: Colour Me In

Perfect: My Love My Life

Wikipedia: Homosexuality

SPLC: Anti-Gay Myths Debunked

Video: Boyfriend Adventure

CDC: Gay and Bisexual Men's Health

Male Montage: Blame it on the Girls

Gays You'll Date Before You Die

Somebody to Love

Handsome Man by Matt Alber

Research: Unique Stressors for Gay Men

Kang Guk and Tae Joo: Take Me Apart

Queer Kid Stuff: What Does Gay Mean?

Land of Storms: Fine Line

Ray's Coming Out Story

Gay Men's Health and Identity: Social Change and Life Course

 

In Praise of Visiting the Gay Bar
 

The first time I stepped inside a gay bar was also the first time I kissed a man. I was 19 years old and the bar was in the conservative bastion of Colorado Springs. Like many gay bars in the early 1980’s, it was a non-descript building with blacked-out windows and perched on the edge of town; the city’s dirty little secret. The bar, like the kiss, was a thrill I would not experience again for more than 20 years.

I was working as a tour guide at “The Lost Gold Mine” in Central City and living with my lesbian aunt and her psychic girlfriend in the summer of 1982. There are stories I have yet to tell my mother about that night. The way I lied about my age to the bartender and became drunk on vodka tonics. How Donna Summer, Tina Turner and Diana Ross (or their drag queen look-alikes) coaxed me up on stage and showered me with glittery hugs. And the moment I stumbled out of the bar with a handsome young guy and experienced that first kiss beneath the shadow of Pike’s Peak. The bar was like a beautiful island of misfit toys and I belonged.

 

When I returned home to North Carolina, which was also when I retreated back into the closet, I boarded up those stories and stowed them away, but I never forgot them. More than 20 years later, when I was in my 40s and living in Boston, I came out for the second time and ventured once again into a gay bar.

Fritz was a gay sports bar in the trendy South End of Boston and not at all like my first experience. While the ceiling was painted black, the ample sized windows were not. I strolled past them multiple times peeking inside, summoning up the courage to open the door. When I entered, there were a dozen or so guys dressed in work attire, half of them watching a baseball game on the TV screen above the bar and the other half checking out the new arrivals. There was no need to lie about my age, as my greying hair gave that secret away. I didn’t dance with any drag queens or get kissed beneath the silvery moon, but I did experience the tiny thrill that I get to this day when I walk into a gay bar, and I have visited many.

I’ve danced with a New Zealand landscape designer at DJ Station in Bangkok, chatted with an ice-cream truck driver at The Admiral Duncan in the Soho neighborhood of London, flirted with a waiter at Harvey’s in the Castro, talked to some regulars at The Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, partied like a celebrity at The Abbey in West Hollywood and had more fun nights than I can count on two hands at Mainestreet and The Front Porch in Ogunquit, Maine and Club Café in Boston.

 

One night, I overheard a guy in his 20s lament to his gaggle of friends “Ugh, if I’m still coming here when I’m in my 30s, somebody slap me.” I wanted to deliver a pre-emptive strike. Anyone in their 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, 60’s, 70’s or 80’s who is still able to visit a gay bar, should consider himself lucky.

I’m in my 50s now and I still venture out to a gay bar now and then, the last time was with my youngest daughter, Marisa who is in her 20s. I watched her get coaxed up onto the stage and dance with Tramplina, a 6 foot two tall drag queen. I couldn’t help but laugh and see my younger self. I’m not attempting to relive my youth, as much as I am reclaiming what was stolen.

I’ll continue to go to gay bars until either one of us ceases to exist. I’ve heard that they are not necessary now that we’ve become main-stream or that they are too shallow and I have also read that insipid article about how gay men in their 40s should grow up and not go to gay clubs. I have three responses: 1) Being main-stream is overrated; 2) You get out of life what you put into it and 3) a quote from Maurice Chevalier “You don’t stop laughing because you grow older. You grow older because you stop laughing.”
 

The modern day fight for LGBTQ rights began in a bar and there was a generation who fought for those rights but did not live long enough to see them come to fruition. The least I can do is raise a glass to them every now and then and perhaps under the disco lights, steal a kiss from my husband.

[Source: William Dameron, The Authentic Life, March 2017]

 

 

HuffPost: In Praise of Visiting the Gay Bar

Male Montage: Trouble Makers

Video: Hottest Openly Gay Male Celebrities

Michael and Ben

Your Song: My Love My Life

Land of Storms: Fine Line

For Anyone Who's Been Told It's Just a Phase

He's Not My Boyfriend

Johns Hopkins: Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Issues

Awareness Advocacy Project: What Does Gay Mean?

Male Montage: To Love Somebody

 

Talking With Kids: What Does Gay Mean?
 

There is not one right answer. Many people have grown up without hearing the words “gay” or “lesbian.” Therefore, you may not be sure how to respond when a student asks you what they mean. It is better to try to answer than to respond with silence or evade the question. Practice different responses with colleagues, just as you practice other things that you want to learn. Figure out what you feel comfortable saying. Responses will vary by age and developmental stage of the student. Your comfort in answering these questions will set a welcoming tone in your class and school community.

Keep it simple. An answer can be as simple as saying that "gay" means "when a man loves a man or when a woman loves a woman." Try to answer the question honestly without overloading a student with information. Throughout elementary school a student’s ability to understand what “gay” means and what your explanation means may increase with development.

 

Focus on love and relationships. A discussion with elementary-age students about the meanings of “gay” or “lesbian” is a discussion about love and relationships. You can just clarify that people love each other in different ways. Some women love and want to be partners with a man and some women love and want to be partners with a woman. It can be helpful to give concrete examples, such as “Tanya and Angela love each other, and they want to be family to each other.”

Understand what the student is asking. If a second-grader says to you, “Alexia said that Ricardo is gay. What does gay mean?” You could begin with, “Do you know why Alexia said that?” Or a student could say, “I heard that Omar’s dad is gay. What does that mean?” Listening first gives you a good idea of what your student wants to know and needs to know. Will your answer be about name-calling, defining what it means to be gay, different kinds of families, or some combination of answers?

 



Think about what messages you want to share.


--All people deserve respect.
--Making fun of people by calling them “gay” (or “sissy” or “queer”) is hurtful. It can hurt both the student who is targeted and anyone who hears it who may have a gay relative or friend.
--Using the name of any group of people as an insult is not OK, because it is most often based on negative stereotypes.
--People can fall in love and want to be in a relationship with people of the same gender or with people of a different gender.

Sample responses.

--A gay person is someone who loves someone who is the same gender.

--A gay person is someone who cares about and is affectionate with someone who is the same gender.
--A gay person is someone who is in a committed romantic relationship with someone who is the same gender.

--The word "gay" describes a man and a man or a woman and a woman who love each other.
--It describes a boy who wants to have a boyfriend or a girl who wants to have a girlfriend.

 

 

Gay Men and Sexual Promiscuity
 

A 2020 study reports that women tend to keep their distance from gay men described as sexually promiscuous. New research suggests that sexual promiscuity negatively impacts social responses toward both gay and straight men. The study, published in the journal Psychology of Men & Masculinities, found that women are more likely to seek to avoid gay men described as promiscuous compared to gay men who are not described as promiscuous.

“Perceptions of masculinity, and stereotypes toward gay men, are multifaceted,” said study author Corey Cook, an assistant professor of psychology at Pacific Lutheran University. “I was interested in knowing what happens when some of these perceptions overlap; for example, does perceived sexual promiscuity (which is associated with traditional ideas of masculinity, but also used as a justification for antigay prejudice) affect perceptions of gay and straight men similarly? These kinds of comparisons can help us understand where these prejudices come from, and hopefully help us find ways to reduce them.”

In the study, 354 heterosexual undergraduate students were randomly assigned to report their social attitudes towards either gay men, straight men, gay men who are sexually promiscuous, straight men who are sexually promiscuous, gay men with very feminine qualities, straight men with very feminine qualities, gay men with very masculine qualities, or straight men with very masculine qualities.

 

 


To assess their attitudes, the participants were asked how strongly they agreed or disagreed with statements such as “I would like for a member of this group to work in the same place as I do” and “Members of this group are the kind of people that I tend to avoid.” The researchers found that both female and male participants reported greater social distancing toward gay men than toward straight men. Women also reported greater social distancing toward sexually promiscuous gay men than gay men in general. Men, however, showed no difference in attitude between sexually promiscuous gay men and gay men in general

In addition, Cook and his colleagues found that women reported greater social distancing toward sexually promiscuous straight men compared to all other groups. “One important implication of this research is that attitudes based on sexual behavior can be more nuanced than we often think. Research consistently finds that heterosexual women are generally more accepting of gay men than heterosexual men are. My findings suggest that this is not the case when gay men are explicitly labeled as sexually promiscuous,” Cook said.

“Additionally, heterosexual women and men respond negatively toward straight men labeled as sexually promiscuous. This is interesting because heterosexual men have traditionally used ‘sexual prowess’ as a way to boost their status; my research suggests that this tactic might not work as well as men think.”

 



In a second experiment with 500 participants recruited via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, the researchers found evidence that women’s negativity toward sexually promiscuous gay men was related to concern for disease threats. But perceived disease threat only explained some of the relationship. “One major caveat to these findings is that our data do not fully explain why women responded so negatively toward targets labeled as sexually promiscuous. What is it about sexual promiscuity that elicited such negative reactions from women in our studies?” Cook said.

“Also, what perpetuates this “masculine” norm among men if both men and women respond negatively to sexual promiscuity? I hope my findings are interesting enough to motivate other researchers to explore these questions in ways I haven’t yet thought of.”

“I think the timing of this research is fortuitous. We are at a point culturally when people are beginning to ask very important questions about traditional ideas of gender, sex, and sexuality. Maybe findings such as these can help us think of ways to redefine masculinity and help us find healthier ways of perceiving sexuality,” Cook added.

The study, “You Don’t Know Where He’s Been: Sexual Promiscuity Negatively Affects Responses Toward Both Gay and Straight Men“, was authored by Corey L. Cook and Catherine A. Cottrell.
 

[Source: Eric W. Dolan, Psy Post, July 2020]

 

 

Superior Gay Brains

 

Actor Lisa Kudrow, of Friends fame and other television and film projects, has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Vassar College. So she is smarter in real life than the Phoebe character she played on the Friends TV show.  She has a biological theory about gay men in general, based on some semi-scientific data.

“I don't know who I'm going to offend by leaving anybody out, but I need to say that I think gay men are superior beings in my mind. I do believe that. It's all so tricky. I studied biology.  And their brains are anatomically different. They just are. There's a stronger connection with the corpus callosum in gay men. The two sides of the brain communicate better than a straight men's brains. And I think that has to be really important. I think those qualities make them like superhuman to me."

[Source: Lisa Kudrow, Vanity Fair, Oct 2014]

 

PsyPost: Gay Men and Sexual Promiscuity

NIH Report: Effects of Masculine Ideals on Gay Men

Gay Movie Montage: Colour Me In

Accepting Yourself: Being Gay is Not Easy

Gay Love

For Anyone Who's Been Told It's Just a Phase

Male Montage: To Love Somebody

Video Talk: Dating is Difficult for a Gay Guy

Homosexual Men

How Gay Came to Mean Homosexual

CDC: Gay and Bisexual Men's Health

Info: LGBTQ Community

Somebody to Love

Gay Guyde: What Does Gay Mean?

 

 

Wikipedia: Definition of Gay

HuffPost: In Praise of Visiting the Gay Bar

Video: What Does Gay Mean?

Alex and Winston: Someone You Loved

Johns Hopkins: Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Issues

Kang Guk and Tae Joo: Take Me Apart

Come At Me Bro

Info: Sexual Orientation

TED Talk: Why Am I So Gay?

He's Not My Boyfriend

Male Montage: Trouble Makers

Gay Men's Health and Identity: Social Change and Life Course

Video Documentary: The Gay Word

PBS Video: History of the Word Gay

Michael and Ben

Gays You'll Date Before You Die

SPLC: Anti-Gay Myths Debunked

True Definition of Gay

Video Discussion: Gay Men Describe What it Means to be Gay

Francis and Nicholas


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